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Boston Restaurant Recommendations


dweller
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Thanks Peter. But the MFA web site lists only 2 food venues open on Sunday, neither with anything about an 11:30 seating. Looks like the Fraser Garden Court Terrace is closed on weekends.

Perhaps the brunch is a thing of the past, that's my impression.

Doug

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  • 6 months later...

Is Charlie's open on Sunday? If it is, go there and order the turkey hash. You will not regret it. The rest of the food is okay, but you will never forget the hash.

Have you checked the brunch scene at some of the Boston area hotels? That may be your best bet for a traditional sort of brunch. Stephanie's on Newbury has pretty good food and is in a great location for leisurely strolling an people watching.

Who is Michelle Topor? Almost every time my husband and I go into Boston I schlep him around the North End, going up every little side street and alley, checking out all the groceries and hardware store. Would love to go on a tour with someone who knows his or her stuff.

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Thanks for the memories everyone. I haven't been back to Boston in years.

I've forgotten too much to make a meaningful post. But that wont stop me. I second the recommendations for Blue Room, Dali, and Elephant Walk. I thought the Brazillian BBQ on Mass Ave in cambridge was pretty good, when the rotisserie was working. There was a great old bar/restaurant on Columbus (I think) in the South End. And I believe that Boston's North End is better than both New York's Little Italy and San Fran's North Beach (which is hardly Italian).

For the best sandwich on the planet, go to Hungry Herb's in Malden (I think it's route 60, about 1 mile east of 95). Chicken tips and steak tips in dozens of styles. I love the Fireball (chicken and Italian sausage in hot sauce) and the Cajun Cooler (chicken, linguica, hot peppers, hot sauce and blue cheese). Terrific french fry combos as well. And Herb, who's name is Dennis, will consider you family by the time you finish your first meal.

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I'm going to have to try Hungry Herbs. I did a search and it looks like it's actually in Medford, not Malden (which means it's even closer to my house!).

Was the bar in the South End, Tim's Tavern? That is a great place, famous for their burgers in particular.

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We're (self and wife) going to be in Boston next April for a couple of days (coming in on the Chicago Amtrak, so probably late into South Street, all day the next day, leaving the next afternoon). So that's 2 breakfasts, 2 lunches, one dinner.<p>I want to go to Durgin-Park for sentimental reasons, but don't have any other fixed ideas, although Movenpick Marche sounds fun.  Not a lot of money to spend, I like road food, home cooking, cheap Italian, buffets, cafeterias.  Staying not far from Faneuil Hall.<p>Any suggestions?<p>Thanks.<p>Doug

On a Budget ?

Eat at Quincy Market - Lobster rolls, fried clams, and chowder for lunch

Heat over to little italy for dinner - tons of little trattorias or hit up Kingfish Hall (at the Hall) Nice raw bar and very nice plates - probably the most casual of the Todd English restaurants. Try Figs for that matter

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Last time my husband and I were in Boston we did the North End walk, including a visit to Paul Revere's house (where I hadn't been since a field trip in grade school) which was quite interesting, and then we walked around trying to find a restaurant. It was one of those days when you don't really know what you want and none of the menus look appealing but you're hungry and tired and just want to eat. We went into a little place on the corner of Hanover Street and Parmenter, a place called Trattoria Il Panino. There are several around, but this is apparently the original. It's a small place and it was pretty empty. We didn't have great hopes, but the pasta was delicious. Homemade, light and fresh tasting. Very reasonably priced. We knew we hit the jackpot when one of the waitresses came in to start her shift -- big black hair, lots of heavy gold, a tight black skirt, leopard print top and a thick accent: the real thing

:smile: .

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'd appreciate members' input on a restaurant in Boston for Saturday lunch and for Sunday lunch. (Note I am not interested in Aujourd'hui, and will be having dinner at Clio) My present Saturday booking is Sel de la Terre. The applicable criterion is quality of cuisine. :wink:

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In August, my wife, sister, and I had a Thursday lunch at Radius in downtown Boston. It was excellent. I wish my wife was nearby because she has a better memory for things such as what we ate, but, I do recall a few things: I had a watermelon soup that was the most unusual, sweet, refreshing, and excellent soup that I can recall eating. Someone had some kind of a lobster sandwich (that is an awful description that doesn't hardly do it justice). I think I had some kind of steak. The desserts were amazing, and I had a real nice cheese plate. And, best of all, they had a few grappa selections to pick from for post meal digestion (I don't see that too often down here in NC).

Anyway, that's probably not the most helpful description, but, the short version is, we all loved our lunch.

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Hi Cabrales, the list is smaller since many places (including Radius) don't serve weekend lunch, but here are some suggestions (offering quality cuisine, of course!):

The Federalist, Beacon Hill

Truc, South End--only Sunday brunch, no Sat. lunch

No. 9 Park, Beacon Hill

and, although I haven't been there, based on what I've heard and read, I think Sel de la Terre would be a great option as well. Please do report back!

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I had lunch recently at Sel de la Terre (Salt of the Earth, translated). SDLT is a very informal restaurant, located near the Aquarium and the starting point of certain whale-watching cruises. It is the sibling of L'Espalier, and has the former sous-chef of L'Espalier as its chef. The lunch was average-minus-to-poor.

The bread at SDLT is supposed to be unusual, as the chef takes a particular interest in breadmaking. However, I did not find it particularly appealing.

We began with a "petit gouter" (small taste) of Tomato Confit with Aged Balsamic ($5), shared between two people. This consisted of 1/2 of a largish tomato, with skin removed. The tomato has been cooked slowly, according to the dining room team member. It was too soft, and the roasted garlic, olive oil, balsamic and chive bits did not enliven the dish enough. Overall, average-minus.

We also shared a Provencal steamed mussels dish ($7), which was also average-minus. The mussels came in a tomato-based broth that was alright (other ingredients included white wine and softened onion). However, the mussel meat itself was unduly soft, and lacked the taste of the sea.

I proceeded to sample 1/2 a portion of Poached Eggs with Country Smoked Ham, Spinach, Roasted Potatoes and Hollandaise Sauce. This was average, with two eggs appropriately runny in the inside and sides of ham. The spinach had nicely blended with the appropriately light hollandaise. A small sprig of chervil was appropriate, as were the roasted red pepper bits for added flavoring.

The other entree was a special request. I asked that the Sliced BBQ chicken from the sandwich selection be made into a salad. This dish suffered from several problems. First, I had asked specifically that the chicken not be sliced in the salad; the resulting dish did not meet this requirement. Second, the barbecue sauce was not particularly tasting. Cumin had been included in it, and it was too severe for the dish, although the cumin components were not particularly pronounced. Third, the chicken, while not poor in an absolute sense in quality, as poor relative to the Belle Rouge variety Blue Hill had provided to me the night before.

We did not order dessert. Lunch was completed in less than 1.5 hours. SDLT is not a gastronomic restaurant, in my view. It can hardly be called a bistro. It is perhaps better viewed as an informal eatery. :hmmm:

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  • 1 month later...

Just got back from Boston and Cambridge. Only ate at 3 restaurants: one with friends, and 2 through Women Chefs and Restaurateurs. I will be kind and not even name the first place. However, both Sage (in the North End) and Rialto (yes, Jody Adams's place that's been around so long) were excellent. Granted, they did special menus just for us; but most dishes were very, very good. The gnocchi with sage brown butter at Sage :rolleyes: were delicate and light, and lots of lemon balanced to buttery sauce; and the pesto-like dip for bread (basil, parsley, tomatoes, and red onion) was incredibly fresh-tasting. At Rialto, we had the grilled clams plain (without the andouille) and they were very sweet. The "Slow roasted Long Island duck" was not as crisp-skinned as I like it, but the meat was succulent and the spicing worked well. Those who had the grilled tuna with chorizo and piri-piri sauce were quite pleased. Of the 7 desserts on the menu (we had all of them for 8 people, with doubles on the chocolate cream with molasses ice cream), my favorite was the Chèvre cheesecake with cranberry coulis -- neither too rich nor too sweet. I can't talk about the wines, since we provided our own.

Other groups went to No. 9 Park, Mantra, Radius, Lumière, Sandrines, and Caffe Umbre, among others. All the reports I heard were positive. And this from restaurant professionals. :smile:

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Yes, of course. :biggrin: One of the main functions of WCR is to give women in the field the opportunity to meet, teach, and learn from each other. Another is to recognize the accomplishments of women. For example, this year's President's Award for lifetime achievement went to Edna Lewis; in previous years it was given to Alice Waters (1999), Madeline Kamman (2000), and Barbara Tropp (2001).

Anyone is interested in learning more about the organization can check out the WCR website. (I warn you, though, the site needs a LOT of work :sad: ) Or I'll be happy to start another thread somewhere about the group.

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  • 7 months later...

I'm thinking of going to Boston this coming weekend 7/18-7/20 would love to get some restaurant recommendations. I heard No. 9 Park is supposed to be very good, but otherwise I can't seemed to remember all that I've read about. I would love to hear from egulleters in the area, and meet some of you as well.

Edited by Bond Girl (log)

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

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Two rec's:

Oleana in Cambridge - great Turkish food. If you haven't had Turkish before - no worries - nothing really weird about it - just great Mediterranean food.

Blue Ginger - Ming Tsai's joint - I haven't personally been - I live in Seattle, but my brother raves about it everytime he goes!

Here's a link to our review from last December:

Scrat & Tighe's Review-

Good luck and have fun!

"Unleash the sheep!" mamster

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Clio and Radius. Picking my favorite of the two would depend on my mood, though Ken Oringer's cooking at Clio tends to be push the envelope a bit more (in a good way). Clio also has a sushi/sahshimi bar in an adjacent lounge that may offer an alternative if reservations are difficult to secure.

Michael Schlow (Radius) also has two other restaurants, Via Matta, open now just over a year, and his latest, seafood-focused, if I recall, the name of which escapes me.

No. 9 Park is solid and I've seen improvement over subsequent visits. Barbara Lynch deservedly won this year's Beard Award for the Northeast.

Actually, I have to confess, one of the best meals I've had in the last few years was at Clio. Ask for Ken to orchestrate your menu, and you just may be blown away. Question for anyone who has been recently... How are the desserts at Clio these days? I know the pastry chef is relatively new and I've heard he's doing "interesting" things... Anyone?

Michael Laiskonis

Pastry Chef

New York

www.michael-laiskonis.com

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Bond Girl:

I second Michael's recommendations. Radius is definitely better all-around, even if Schlow isn't likely to be there, because it has consistency on its side. Clio, as noted, tends toward the avant garde lite, and would be more memorable over time, even if the meal provides a few slip-ups.

Much peace,

Ian Lowe

ballast/regime

"Get yourself in trouble."

--Chuck Close

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Both Lumiere and Blue Ginger require a car for transportation. If you're staying in Boston or Cambridge proper there are enough excellent restaurants to try without any major schlepping. Actually, depending on where you stay you may have several great options you can walk to.

I've heard wonderful things about No. 9 Park. Though I haven't eaten there personally, I've taken a wine class with sommelier(e) Cat Silirie, and if the wine list reflects even half of her enthusiasm, knowledge and joie de vivre you can't go wrong with anything on the list. My husband and brother-in-law had lunch there about a year ago and found everything delicious, service great. They had lunch at The Federalist a few months afterward and raved about it.

Davio's, at their new location on the corner of Arlington St., is a great spot. Italian/steakhouse, interesting menu, warm yet formal service, surprisingly reasonably priced. The chicken livers are absolutely to die for.

Have fun -- Boston is beautiful in the summer (ride the Swan Boats!).

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thanks so much. At first I didn't knowwhere to go, now it's so many choices, so little time. I will stay in boston proper. So, blue ginger is out of the question, but will try to get to No. 9 park as i had a wonderful experience at the Beard House when Barbara Lynch cooked there.

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

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I've been to Meritage (in the Boston Harbor Hotel) twice and have had excellent food and even better service both times. The sommelier is very helpful, discreet, and not snobbish.

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