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Czar Nicholas II


winesonoma
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Pre Russian Revolution wines for sale. Stored for the Czar and preserved by Stalin. http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor..._s_wine_cellars

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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The impression that I got from the article is that these were mostly if not all Russian produced wines from the Massandra winery. I did not recognize many of the grape varieties mentioned.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

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Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

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The impression that I got from the article is that these were mostly if not all Russian produced wines from the Massandra winery. I did not recognize many of the grape varieties mentioned.

Its not Opus or old French wine. It is what it is. Turn of the century and before. Gimme a corkscrew and I'll find something to like. Wow! :biggrin:

Edited by winesonoma (log)

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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The bulk of the cellar offered were indeed wines from the Massandra winery. The primary varietal is Tokay. We today have no real knowledge of these wines, which is why, sadly, they performed poorly at auction. Prince Golitsyn was considered the very finest and most knowledgable wine maker and sommelier of the turn of last century. His lectures and tastings were considered legendary. The cellar he compiled was unequalled in Europe at the time. His favorite welcome for any visitor of note to "Noviy Svyet",(New World) his personal estate near Massandra was to ask the guest to name his very favorite wine, by specific producer and vintage, whatever it may be. After the guest named the wine, Golitsyn would disappear into the cellars and produce the very wine named, and serve it in glassware from the time of Catherine the Great. Massandra was the personal property of the Tsar, and Prince Golitsyn ran the Imperial wineries in Yalta for the Tsar.

Massandra wines are amazing. They will last for many decades. The closest approximation are the finest Hungarian Tokaj Assiz wines, the 5 or 6 puttanjos. The cuvees made by Golitsyn in the late 19th century were prized far higher than anything from Bordeaux or Burgundy.

What a shame that the lifeless Cabernets of Napa garner far more attention today that these incredibly crafted, complex and long-lived gems made by an amazing craftsman.

"When I lived in Paris, and champagne was relatively cheap, I always enjoyed a half-bottle in the middle of the morning and another half-bottle at six or so in the evening. It did me a tremendous amount of good." - Gerald Hamilton.
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