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scotsaute

Recommendations for the local eats near CDG

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Very late notice I know but a last minute business trip means that I’m staying at Paris CDG airport this evening with a fairly early flight tomorrow. I was hopping someone may be able to recommend a decent (not too expensive) place to eat in the local area as I hate to think what the airport hotels catering is like???

Thanks in advance,

Scotsaute

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Very late notice I know but a last minute business trip means that I’m staying at Paris CDG airport this evening with a fairly early flight tomorrow.  I was hopping someone may be able to recommend a decent (not too expensive) place to eat in the local area as I hate to think what the airport hotels catering is like???

Thanks in advance,

Scotsaute

OK, here's the deal; I've researched it a lot over the years and you either eat in town (35-40 min) or at the Sheraton where there's a branch of the Brasserie Flo open 7/7 lunch and dinner (but I had a disappointing meal two years ago, even tho I ordered defensively) or their top resto - Les Etoiles which is much but not incredibly much better; it's closed weekends but that doesn't apply to you. There are towns (eg Roissy) around but I've scouted around to find a place without success. Indeed between Paris and Beauvais & Amiens things are pretty slim. About hotels in France, they're not like elsewhere, often the best restos in France are in hotels, Paris being the prime example - Crillion, Cinq, Bristol, etc etc, so that's not the issue. Hope you got this in time, give us a bit more lead time next trip. Cheers.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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About hotels in France, they're not like elsewhere, often the best restos in France are in hotels, Paris being the prime example - Crillion, Cinq, Bristol, etc etc, so that's not the issue.  Hope you got this in time, give us a bit more lead time next trip.  Cheers.

Paris isn't the only example, but these are all destination restaurants. The run of the mill restaurant in a chain hotel in France is not all that lilkely to be different from what you find in the US in terms of quality, except that the name of the dishes will sound better in French. Michelin doesn't even mention a restaurant not in a hotel nearby. Only the Sheraton, Hilton and Sofitel hotel restaurants are cited by name. I suppose I'd aim for one of them, but I'd not expect great value.

A not too expensive meal rules out a roundtrip by taxi. If you have enough time, and can leave your luggage at a hotel in the airport, it might be worthwhile coming in to Paris by publlic transport. As far as the local area, I don't even know how you'd begin to search out a hotel. You'd have to leave the airport by taxi and need some destination. I have a 2003 GaultMillau handy. It deigns to list but one restaurant in Roissy and that's Les Etoiles. They gave it a 14/20 which is respectable.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

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There's a Brasserie Flo and a Maxim's at CDG.


Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly....MFK Fisher

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There's a Brasserie Flo and a Maxim's at CDG.

I've generally defended the brasseries in the Flo chain, but I wonder if I'd feel the same way without the wonderful interiors they've preserved all over Paris. As for "a Maxim's," I wonder what the appeal might be. Is there still a Maxim's in Paris and is the one at the airport in any way connected with a Maxim's that was ever connected with fine food. I believe the name's been traded and sold, perhaps more than once, and the last Maxim's in Paris brought no gastronomic credit to the name. I think I'd be scared away from an airport restaurant trading on that old name perhaps too recognizable to tourists.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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There's a Brasserie Flo and a Maxim's at CDG.

I've generally defended the brasseries in the Flo chain, but I wonder if I'd feel the same way without the wonderful interiors they've preserved all over Paris. As for "a Maxim's," I wonder what the appeal might be. Is there still a Maxim's in Paris and is the one at the airport in any way connected with a Maxim's that was ever connected with fine food. I believe the name's been traded and sold, perhaps more than once, and the last Maxim's in Paris brought no gastronomic credit to the name. I think I'd be scared away from an airport restaurant trading on that old name perhaps too recognizable to tourists.

You bet there is and right next door on the Rue Royale there's a shop selling all sorts of Maxim tchotchkes. What the corporate relationship between the airport (there's also one at Orly) Maxim's & downtown I don't know.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I don't want to take this off topic, but I hate to leave the subject of Maxim's hanging. I last recall the name, and perhaps the premises as well, being purchased by a well known fashion designer. I have not heard it was closed, but I didn't see it listed in the 2004 Guide Michelin.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I don't want to take this off topic, but I hate to leave the subject of Maxim's hanging. I last recall the name, and perhaps the premises as well, being purchased by a well known fashion designer. I have not heard it was closed, but I didn't see it listed in the 2004 Guide Michelin.

Bux I swear I was just walking by it two weeks ago on my way to the "Where" office and it looked OK. And the Eat in Paris site lists it actively.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Once my wife and I were returning to the states from Paris on Northwest.

I had shown my wife an article on "The Man Without A Country" living in CDG. Being the bleeding heart liberal she is, she bestowed last of our Francs on him. "We won't need them," she said.

Lo and behold, Northwest had mechanical problems and couldn't fly. They sent us to one of the worse box hotels I have ever stayed in an gave us a $20 voucher for food. I understand (I think it was Hilton or Sherton) that it was run of the mill for CDG.

Terrible way to end a wonderful trip.

Dave

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I don't want to take this off topic, but I hate to leave the subject of Maxim's hanging. I last recall the name, and perhaps the premises as well, being purchased by a well known fashion designer. I have not heard it was closed, but I didn't see it listed in the 2004 Guide Michelin.

March's Where clears up the issue and Bux, your memory was perfect. Maxim's was purchased by Pierre Cardin; the downstairs has a "show" called La Nouvelle Dame de Chez Maxim's every Tuesday afternoon with Belle Epoque songs; the upper floors are a museum set up like a "lavish" flat with guided tours by an art historian. The only mention of food is that the flat "might" have been home to those risque women who dined below.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Is there still a Maxim's in Paris

As an imperfect but driven "flaneur," I chanced by Maxim's today. There's a small cafe which appears rather pathetic considering its history. There's a shop of Maxim-branded tchotchkes. There is supposed to be an expo of photos on the second floor, but the "greeter" seemed oblivious. Not the Maxims of yore.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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