Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Leeks


bobmac
 Share

Recommended Posts

Rachel Ray make a leek soup yesterday using much more of the green than I normally use (I go up about an inch and a half, two inches). Did she use more because it was a soup? What's the rule of thumb? Have I been wasteful?

"Last week Uncle Vinnie came over from Sicily and we took him to the Olive Garden. The next day the family car exploded."

--Nick DePaolo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends on the leeks, Is suppose. For years I only used the absolute whitest of the white part. Then I started slicing higher and higher into the green. Now I'll go almost to where the stalks start to separate and haven't noticed a remarkable difference.

BTW, besides asparagus, I think leeks are just about the most elegant vegetable. They are subtle in flavor and can be heightened with bearnaise sauce. Frizzled leeks can top the best soups and plain sautéed leeks with cream and tarragon can't be beat as a side dish for those haute cuisine style dinner parties.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a garden full of leeks and made soup yesterday with a very liberal dose of leeks; probably $10 worth if I had to buy them. I use up to just the start of the dark green. If the leeks have been blanched in the soil there's lots of stem to use. Soup comes out a nice light green-yellow (I also use yellow Fin potatoes).

it was cold in Seattle yesterday and the soup made a great lunch. We'll do it again today.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depending on the usage, I will use any amount of the leek.

I made a leek salad once that was incredible and involved trimming only the tired ends off the green part. The leeks were parboiled and then cooled. After being attractively arranged (wrapped around themselves in a circle) on the plate, they were topped with a vinaigrette and some hard-boiled egg yolk crumbles. The taste of the leeks was truly memorable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love using the green part of the leeks.

I've made a two-toned soup with one half from the whites, the other from the green.

At the very least I'll use the green part in making stocks.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too generally save the green parts for making stocks. It's a nice economical, practical use of something I would have discarded anyway.

edit: I also occasionally quickly blanch them and then place them in the bottom of a roasting pan so the flavour of the leeks infuses into the final pan gravy.

Edited by Shalmanese (log)

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I follow Jacques Pepin's advice and make stock of the dark green part, freeze it and use it for all kinds of soups. Leeks are darned expensive and I hate to waste any of them.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

slice them thin, fry in butter with some bacon till frizzly and brown round the edges, stir into mashed potato.

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am now emboldened with my leek usage!

I always wondered how much green I should use, and I tend to use more green for soups and such. I will now be saving the ends for stock, as I have never noticed any harm done by them. One of my favorite things is braised leeks, with a liberal pat of butter added at the end.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...