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Al_Dente

An Ideal Negroni

293 posts in this topic

I generally prefer Cinzano to M&R. I confess to not spending a lot of effort to search out anything fancier, here in the bush.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I had a Lua Bonita (Cachaca Negroni) tonight. Lovely drink. Really wonderful. Made it with Punt e Mes.

Made it with Punt e Mes too. I guess I expected something along the lines of a rum-based Negroni. It's not that at all. It seems to ramp up the bitterness a bit. It works.


Chris Taylor

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I used Beefeater (94 proof), Carpano Antica and Campari, at first equal parts. Then I noticed that I preferred a 50% increase of the Carpano Antica (thus 1.5:1:1).

Since I've tried regular Cinzano rosso in it, I realized this vermouth rosso style suits the drink much better, and as a plus it's more gentle to the budget. 1:1:1 with Broker's gin (94 proof) is what my favorite ratio is at the moment.

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I asked the bartender at a restaurant last night to make a negroni with Gran Classico subbed for the Campari -- I wasn't able to see him make it, so ratios/brand of vermouth/degree of stirring etc. were unknown.

I had liked GC in another drink the week before, but in this instance what a got was a hint of complex spice, which was nice, but not nearly the bitter punch of Campari, which is part of what makes a Negroni a Negroni, of course. I'd be curious to try again with more control over the mixing details . . . .


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I asked the bartender at a restaurant last night to make a negroni with Gran Classico subbed for the Campari -- I wasn't able to see him make it, so ratios/brand of vermouth/degree of stirring etc. were unknown.

I had liked GC in another drink the week before, but in this instance what a got was a hint of complex spice, which was nice, but not nearly the bitter punch of Campari, which is part of what makes a Negroni a Negroni, of course. I'd be curious to try again with more control over the mixing details . . . .

I am about to try that experiment at home very soon. I will make sure to report my findings!


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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As promised here is the Negroni battle, Tempus Fugit's Gran Classico Bitter (originally from Turin but made in Switzerland) vs. Campari.

Neat first

8452588604_91cf5bced2_z.jpg

Equal parts (mini) Negroni with an orange coin

8451500059_99378a2d79_z.jpg

On its own, Gran Classico is not as intense as the Campari. Campari has a much brighter orange flavor (similar a little bit to Cointreau vs. PF dry curacao). And the color is the other obvious difference.

The Gran Classico Negroni was more herbal and had a syrup-like quality, almost like honey, that is not there in the Campari version. The orange flavor in the Gran Classico Negroni was more subtle and overall it was a toned-down Negroni with a slightly sweet finish. I thought my husband may like it (he abhors Campari) and very bravely he had a sip, but it was still too bitter for him.

In comparison, the Campari Negroni starts extremely bright and continues with an intense orange flavor, some sweetness, and a memorable bitter finish that makes you long for another sip.

Campari is the clear winner for me in the Negroni. But I am sure that I will find other uses for the Gran Classico. It may be time to revisit the Boulevardier, Old Pal, Left Hand, Right Hand, and so on. Or maybe as an Aperol alternative?


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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There is a bunch of interesting Negroni variations in this article by Bon Appetit ("There's No Wrong Way to Screw Up a Negroni"), including a few that are featured on the menu at Hinoki and the Bird and were mentioned in the discussion in the Boulevardier thread.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Any way to get a Negroni with a less thick, syrupy mouthfeel, short of shaking it? No matter how much I stir, or how many rocks I serve it on, it has such a thickness to it that i find somewhat tiresome...

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Any way to get a Negroni with a less thick, syrupy mouthfeel, short of shaking it? No matter how much I stir, or how many rocks I serve it on, it has such a thickness to it that i find somewhat tiresome...

Yes. Use less sugar and/or more acid. Start with a Perfect Negroni (splitting the sweet vermouth 50/50 with dry). Or use more gin (try 2 oz gin with 1/2 oz each Campari and vermouth(s) -- you might need this on the rocks or a long stir. (Edit: Frog beat me by 4 minutes!)

Here are four Negorini-like variants I tried to lessen the sweetness, which would also lean out the mouthfeel.


Edited by EvergreenDan (log)

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Ack. Reading challenged today. Removed.


Edited by Snark (log)

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Any way to get a Negroni with a less thick, syrupy mouthfeel, short of shaking it? No matter how much I stir, or how many rocks I serve it on, it has such a thickness to it that i find somewhat tiresome...

Yes. Use less sugar and/or more acid. Start with a Perfect Negroni (splitting the sweet vermouth 50/50 with dry). Or use more gin (try 2 oz gin with 1/2 oz each Campari and vermouth(s) -- you might need this on the rocks or a long stir. (Edit: Frog beat me by 4 minutes!)

Here are four Negorini-like variants I tried to lessen the sweetness, which would also lean out the mouthfeel.

I wish dry vermouths were by and large more acidic; it would make them more useful. You can add acid to them at home (I use malic, which gives a green apple-y tartness) but if one of the big vermouth manufacturers promoted a high-acid vermouth it could help free us from the bartender mentality that sour = citrus.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I have to say I don't mind the sweetness per se, it's just the overly thick mouthfeel - I really like the original formula. I blame the Campari for its syrupy nature. That said, I'm using Cinzano red/sweet vermouth, maybe other sweet vermouths are lighter?

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I have to say I don't mind the sweetness per se, it's just the overly thick mouthfeel - I really like the original formula. I blame the Campari for its syrupy nature. That said, I'm using Cinzano red/sweet vermouth, maybe other sweet vermouths are lighter?

Indeed, I find Dolin sweet vermouth to be less syrupy.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Tonight's Nongroni:

2 oz Hayman Royal Dock Navy Strength Gin (yikes)

3/4 oz Punt e Mes

3/4 oz Luxardo Bitter

1/4 oz Zirbenz Stone Pine liqueur

lemon twist

rocks

I was out of dry vermouth (and DrunkLad, I agree it could be more acidic), so I went with strength over beauty. Nice. I'd make it again. 2 oz of 57% gin is, um, a lot.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Another Nongroni:

1 1/2 oz Gin

1 1/2 oz Cocchi Americano

1/2 oz Campari

Huge expressed orange peel

Very nice, if perhaps a bit polite. The Cocchi is more subtle than sweet vermouth (or Punt e Mes), so it dialed back the Campari considerably. I remain convinced that the Negroni is just about unsinkable.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Last night's Negroni variation was the Banks of Torino found via Kindred Cocktails. Banks 5 rum as the base, which makes it a relative of Michael McIlroy's Right Hand (aged rum, sweet vermouth, Campari, mole bitters).

Banks of Torino
by Joshua Perez, Booker & Dax, NYC
1 1/2 oz Blended rum, Banks 5 Island
3/4 oz Aromatized wine, Cocchi Vermouth di Torino
3/4 oz Campari
2 ds Bitters, Angostura
1 twst Orange peel

Build over one large rock, stir and garnish with an orange peel.

I liked how this combination highlighted the aroma of the rum. The vermouth di Torino was great in this drink, just the right fit. This was a very harmonious tropical Negroni. I think that I prefer it to the Right Hand.

8965310304_1232280dae_z.jpg

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Intrigued, and enjoying a birthday, I sought out the Right Hand, with gratitude to the good folks at Bittermens (tx Janet and Avery!) and appreciation for the last few ounces of the Inner Circle Green I've been hoarding:

1.5 oz aged rum (IC Green)

3/4 oz Carpano Antica (I used Punt e Mes)

3/4 oz Campari

2 dashes Bittermens Xocolatl Mole Bitters

Stir; strain; up.

No garnish. Not that it would matter: this IC Green has a nose like an state trooper chasing down speeders on the freeway.


Chris Amirault

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The other day I realized with horror that I had never tried Joaquin Simo's Kingston Negroni. I had tried a cocktail combining Campari with Smith & Cross in Benjamin Schwartz's Professional, as well as countless Negroni variations, but not this one for some reason. I decided to remedy the situation immediately.

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Not as crisp or bitter as a regular Negroni (this was equal parts but I've seen recipes for the Kingston Negroni cutting down the vermouth to 3/4 which makes sense). But it's wonderfully flavorful with the rich aroma of the S&C balancing out the Campari.

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Lucien Gaudin

1.5oz London dry

0.75oz Cointreau

0.75oz extra dry vermouth

0.75oz Campari

Great drink.

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Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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Lucien Gaudin

1.5oz London dry

0.75oz Cointreau

0.75oz extra dry vermouth

0.75oz Campari

Great drink.

attachicon.gif002 (480x640).jpg

Maybe I should give this another try one of these days. I had one a while back was not in love with it despite the Campari and the French inspiration.

I just noticed that you posted it in the Negroni thread. For me it does not have the feel of a Negroni.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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I'm with you on this one, FrogPrincesse. I just don't get the Lucien Gaudin. I've made it maybe twice, and didn't enjoy it either time. I found it too astringent, as I recall. For me, the Cointreau definitely takes this outside the realm of the Negroni.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Erm... yes. I searched for Campari to put that in the Campari cocktails thread but have evidently strayed...

Anyhow, it is not too astringent for me, I enjoy the sour profile a lot.

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