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How to cook and Enjoy Ginko nuts?

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Recently I bought some ginko nuts at a local market. I was wondering if if anyone has some favorite ways to prepare them? I have seen them as tempura, cooked with rice, and simply boiled. What are the best way to prepare and enjoy ginko?

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I really love them in chawan mushi (steamed egg custard) but the best way I have eaten them was the way the prepared them at Imaiya (a yakitori place we visited for an egullet outing), they were skewered and then grilled and lightly sprinkled with salt. Eating them that way though could put you in a dangerous position for ginko poisoning.... :biggrin:


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Are there different species of ginko trees that bear different types of "nuts"? The only ones I've ever seen are the ones we affectionately call "Vomit Berry Trees" because the fruits smell so vile when they fall and get stepped on. :blink: Probably the most unappetizing and gag-inducing smell ever. I can't imagine eating anything like it.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Are there different species of ginko trees that bear different types of "nuts"?  The only ones I've ever seen are the ones we affectionately call "Vomit Berry Trees" because the fruits smell so vile when they fall and get stepped on.  :blink:  Probably the most unappetizing and gag-inducing smell ever.  I can't imagine eating anything like it.
no, they all smell bad like that. those vomit berries contain the gingko nuts that you shell and eat.

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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Are there different species of ginko trees that bear different types of "nuts"?  The only ones I've ever seen are the ones we affectionately call "Vomit Berry Trees" because the fruits smell so vile when they fall and get stepped on.  :blink:  Probably the most unappetizing and gag-inducing smell ever.  I can't imagine eating anything like it.
no, they all smell bad like that. those vomit berries contain the gingko nuts that you shell and eat.

:shock: BLECH!!!!


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Are there different species of ginko trees that bear different types of "nuts"?  The only ones I've ever seen are the ones we affectionately call "Vomit Berry Trees" because the fruits smell so vile when they fall and get stepped on.  :blink:  Probably the most unappetizing and gag-inducing smell ever.  I can't imagine eating anything like it.

the seeds totally don't taste the way the gushy stuff smells. and the trees are so nice in so many ways that as far as i'm concerned the smell is worth it. you've never seen the chinese and koreans around town under the trees gathering gingko nuts in the fall? i've thought about gathering them myself, but i decided against it because there are pretty high lead levels (among other toxins) in a lot of the soil in the city. but i suspect that the folks out gathering them don't know or don't care.

btw, the oldest gingko in the u.s. is out at bartram's garden here in philadelphia; it's about 220 years old. link

http://www.bartramsgarden.org/see/trees.html

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I had no idea there was such a thing as ginko poisoning. I was taught, by a lady at the board of education, to put them into a paper envelope and fold it over so that it won't open up. And stick it in the microwave until you hear them explode (or am I confusing this with popcorn). Anyway, once you hear them explode once, you take them out of the microwave and then beat the bag to break open the shells (you can use a rolling pin) and then you eat the smelly delicious goodnes inside (salt is definitely recommended). you can also do it stovetop. I also like them in chawan mushi, but grilled and salted is nice. I'll be sure not to get poisoned though (yikes!).

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I heard about the poisoning. Is it the center section where it tastes bitter that contribute the toxic chemical? Also, ginko pills were selling like hot cakes ten years ago in the US. They claimed that it will improve memories


Leave the gun, take the canoli

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I am the unfortunate recipient of having a house with a female ginko tree. I have to say that if we could afford the 3k it would cost to cut it down, it would be down in a second.

It turns the fruit actually contains the same oils (urushiol) found in poision oak, which when touched causes nasty side affects. I need to pass under this tree to get to my front door and doing so makes me ill, I am actually nauseaous when I smell it.

Also the oils from the fruit are stripping the finish off our wood floors in the entryway.

It really is a hellacious 45 days for us every fall. The tree unforunately -- it's days are numbered.

You can find more info here.


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

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I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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That tree sounds really difficult!

And I hadn't heard about the gingko poisoning, either! When I tried to follow the link above, it had expired. But I'll google and see what I find.

We've been eating them at the local izakaya. Pan fried in the shells, so the shells turn a beautiful mottled tortoiseshell color. They open partially, revealing the shiny green nuts. Served with a dish of salt, we shell them, roll them in the salt and eat--really delicious.

But I'm definitely in danger of gingko nut poisoning if you're not supposed to eat more than ten!


You gonna eat that?

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Are there different species of ginko trees that bear different types of "nuts"?  The only ones I've ever seen are the ones we affectionately call "Vomit Berry Trees" because the fruits smell so vile when they fall and get stepped on.  :blink:  Probably the most unappetizing and gag-inducing smell ever.  I can't imagine eating anything like it.

Philadelphia-area American-born Chinese call them dingleberries.

Grandmas all over Chinatown come and pick them up when they fall to the ground.

They're also used in Chinese congee, of course.


Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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