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Southern Traditions


Varmint
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Yes, indeed---Orville would be proud.

I still love the Laura books for a Winter read, and we were just discussing Farmer Boy in a thread not long ago.

My memory of her popcorn was the Christmas dinner when their friends the Boasts came for the day, they had a Pa-shot turkey or venison, and then the two ladies made dishpans full of popcorn to sit and munch after dessert.

My most memorable of their holiday meals was the Thanksgiving dinner when they finished the meal with a preciously-saved can of peaches, doled out one half to each little dish, with a few saltines, all from the larder of the (railroad?) storage which they were living in and guarding for the Winter.

Just the description of that golden peach in its heavy syrup, out there in the bare cold landscape alone, the luscious taste and unaccustomed sweetness from afar, with the common old crackers---that child's delight in such a plain treat remains strong on the page.

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  • 2 months later...
What are some of the quintessential southern foods that come to your mind (other than barbecue).  I'm really talking about foods that you generally don't find in the North.<p>I can think of . . .<p>Pimiento Cheese

Pork Rinds (awesome, when they're good and fresh)

Boiled peanuts (make sure they're at least room temp)

Moon Pies

Cheese Straws

Moravian sugar cookies and sugar cakes

CheerWine (diet CheerWine is the best)<p>I could go on all day.  There are a number of Southern exports that have become common up North, including Krispy Kremes, breakfast biscuits, and sweet tea.

Hoe cakes and tomatoe gravy and rice

not to mention grits, I cant tell you how many times ive heard "what is a grit?"

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Yes, indeed---Orville would be proud.

I still love the Laura books for a Winter read, and we were just discussing Farmer Boy in a thread not long ago.

My memory of her popcorn was the Christmas dinner when their friends the Boasts came for the day, they had a Pa-shot turkey or venison, and then the two ladies made dishpans full of popcorn to sit and munch after dessert.

My most memorable of their holiday meals was the Thanksgiving dinner when they finished the meal with a preciously-saved can of peaches, doled out one half to each little dish, with a few saltines, all from the larder of the (railroad?) storage which they were living in and guarding for the Winter.

Just the description of that golden peach in its heavy syrup, out there in the bare cold landscape alone, the luscious taste and unaccustomed sweetness from afar, with the common old crackers---that child's delight in such a plain treat remains strong on the page.

Last weekend, on my way up to Independence Kansas, I passed by the original Little House on the Prairie. I thought the country was beautiful farm country.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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