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Turkey soup


bleachboy
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Okay, so this is my first year hosting Thanksgiving at my place. Thus, this is my first year to have to deal with a turkey carcass.

I'm currently in the process of making turkey stock. I can handle this, as I've gotten pretty good at "The Stock Thing".

So.. how do I prepare a proper soup based on this stock?

I am thinking of something with barley, white beans, or a cream-based soup. Does anybody have any favorite recipes? I have Googled, but most of what I see looks like chicken soup recipes.

Thanks!

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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Well... a "proper" soup is anything you want it to be. :raz:

Actually, on those times that I have gone for soup instead of gumbo, I lean toward having some kind of beans in there. I like hearty soups so a simple veggies, broth and turkey doesn't get it for me. I also head for something with a lot of seasonings so it doesn't taste too much like turkey... which I am not all that fond of. :biggrin: From there I just wing it. (sorry) After the usual onion, garlic and maybe carrot and celery, the beans usually determine what I do next. Pinto beans send me in a Mexican direction adding some chile pepper, cumin, Mexican oregano. White beans may send me in a French or Mediterranean direction with thyme, basil, tarragon, whatever. Garbanzos are a particular favorite due to their texture. With beans you can always cheat and use canned. I like Goya brand. There is always the pasta option, with or without tomato of some sort.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Don,

I have tried a lot of recipes and experimented with many over the years.

However, by far the best one I have ever made (and received rave reviews from my guests)

was the one based on the stock recipe on the web site of my friend Melinda Lee.

Turkey soup, the only recipe you will ever need.

You can modify it with different add-ins, vegetables, pasta, even turkey meat and dumplings, but basically, this is an excellent soup base.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Bleachboy:

Son, I have been making turkey soup for many years.

Cover all the bones you have with water, add carrots, onions, garlic, celery, peppercorns and let it rock slowly for hours.

Strain and add chicken base or broth to get the stock up to taste. This part is important.

Let the stock refrigerate overnite and skim the hardened fat when you are ready

to finish the soup.

Add the same combo of vegetables and include diced turnips; believe me they

add a great dimension to the soup. Reduce the stock until it tastes rich. Then

strain and throw the vegetables in the compost.

Add rice, (the amount depends on how much stock you have), and cook until tender.

Scoop some of the rice out and blend the rest of the rice into the soup. This

makes for a thich, hearty result.

Add the whole rice and some heavy cream and cook for another ten minutes.

During this time add the salt for the first time and pepper and adjust for taste.

Add a bunch of leftover, diced turkey.

This goin to be the best turkey soup you ever had.

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I like some veggies in my turkey soup.

One fav is: Carrots and onions, definitely, another good addition is the eG infamous roasted cauliflower. Orange-flesh squash is also good for adding some dimension. Saute the carrots and onions in butter first (or roast all vegs in the oven with cauliflower, mmm! and add the vegs with turkey at the last). If sauteing vegs add to the stock, heat through while you throw in some thick egg noodles or rice, add your turkey. Stir in a roux of butter and flour and some cream or milk into the soup. Good stuff!

Another comment is go with the momentary mood -- what do you want serve with it? I'm with fifi on the whatever feels good at the time. I do like turkey soup more robust, rather than delicate as chicken soup may be. A good amount of pepper and some rosemary or thyme is good. Toss a bay leaf in there for a while during the veg in stock cooking stage. Ber sure to add your turkey near the end -- it's been cooked and doesn't need to cook again.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Groovy ideas!

At present, I have a stock base with onion, celery, carrots, thyme, peppercorns and a bay leaf. No salt added yet, although the stock has a touch of salt due to the brined turkey.

I think I'll use andiesenji's recipe then add a tiny bit of cream and a starch-type add-on -- beans, orzo, or barley. I did save about three pounds of turkey (mostly dark meat) chunks to add at the end.

Thanks!!

Edited by bleachboy (log)

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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I made Mom a big batch of turkey stock from the frame and bones on Thursday night. On Friday night, I made a quick tomato soup using it as a base. It worked surprisingly well with the tomato flavor, adding to the richness more than chicken stock.

I know you said you wanted a turkey soup recipe, but thought I'd throw out there that you can use turkey stock in just about any soup you'd use chicken stock for. I'd think mushroom-barley soup, split pea soup, and turkey-wild rice soup would be particularly good with turkey stock.

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Gumbo. Really good gumbo. Turkey and sausage. Don't listen to these people. They are all very nice, but misguided. Don't let them guide you down the garden path. Stand on your own there in Music City, like a man.

Soup?

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Far be it from me to contradict Brooks, but. But. Gulp.

Turkey soup (however you wanna get there) with sliced carrots and shiitakes and Amontillado sherry, and no celery or rice or onions, and leftover gravy (and maybe stuffing, too) makes my turkey soup something Bob waits all year long for.

But I'm sure he'd love gumbo, too.

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Personally I strain my stock and then eat it as a comfort food / light dinner. Just some of the stock with what ever I have in the fridge and orzo. The Orzo puffs up and absorbs the stock great stuff :smile:

Last night was stock + a little left over turkey + orzo + carrots + onion + garlic.

Never trust a skinny chef

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I just made a batch this afternoon, and most of what I did is mentioned in some form or another here...and the broth (to which I added some low-salt chicken broth, b/c turkey stock seems to cook down a lot more than chicken) is cooling for fat skimming in the a.m.! I almost always puree some or all of the veggies (onion, fresh parsley, carrots, celery) and put it back in to the broth, which gives it great body. I also add a ton of shredded meat, and with turkey, wild rice. I cooked the rice in a mixture of chicken stock and water, and leave some of the residual liquid in the soup for added thickening. I have yet to add cream, b/c the soup is always so hearty!

For turkey soup, I saute some mushrooms in sherry and add them in, and I also throw in a can of Green Giant no-salt Niblets. Not sure why, but I started doing this a few years ago, and the addition of that little can of corn is always a pleasant surprise--just ask anyone who tries my turkey-wild rice soup! :biggrin:

"I'm not eating it...my tongue is just looking at it!" --My then-3.5 year-old niece, who was NOT eating a piece of gum

"Wow--this is a fancy restaurant! They keep bringing us more water and we didn't even ask for it!" --My 5.75 year-old niece, about Bread Bar

"He's jumped the flounder, as you might say."

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I vary the starch according to mood -- rice, noodles, potatoes, dumplings. I also like corn.

And we are basically southwesterners, so there's always the possibility that our turkey soup will turn into tortilla soup with the addition of salsa, chiles, lime and tortillas.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Okay, I immediately cave to Mayhaw, because Louisiana Knows How To Do It. Gumbo it is. I have the sausage, I have the trinity, the roux. I have about two pounds of turkey meat. Pictures tomorrow.

p.s. I also have Cajun Dressing from Poche's as an additional leftover, with homemade cornbread, Louisiana crawfish tails, etc. (as add-ons to their dressing mix). Gumbo is actually my best-bet leftover recipe.

Edited by bleachboy (log)

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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p.s. the stock is made, but it's a bit greasy due probably due to the deep-fried turkey, so tomorrow is when I make my soup, after I have refrigerated the stock so that I can scoop off the solidified grease, and add the appropriate pork fat. :wub::wub::wub::wub:

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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To attempt a truly dark and sultry :wink: gumbo, please go here for the roux instructions.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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That does not suck.

I have to say that after the family started to expect the gumbo, my options for getting creative with soup went to the wayside.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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