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Christian Parra's Boudin Noir available in Paris


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I'm posting this in the France forum because I doubt this product is available outside France. I suspect it's not readily available in many parts of France. It's a boudin noir that's canned in the Pyrénées Atlantic and hot stuff. I mean it's really good as well as that it's made with a nice dose of Basque piment d'Espellette. Had it not been highly recommended to me, I would not have even considered canned boudin. Of course it has the advantage of traveling and keeping on the shelf quite well. Anyone who loves blood sausage and who is traveling through the Pays Basque, should keep an eye out for it. My favorite boudin noir have been those from the Basque region. In fact, I'm told this boudin, canned by Maison Montauzer in 64250, is made according to Christian Parra's recipe. Parra used to own the two star la Galoupe in Urtz where he was famous for his boudin noir among other things. He now has a little bistro in the Basque Pyrenees.

Robert Buxbaum

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Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

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  • 1 month later...

A note for fans of Boudin Noir. We found Christian Parra's Boudin Noir at Da Rosa, 62 rue de Seine, Paris, 6th arr. Phone 01.40.51.00.09 (www.darosa.fr)

It is the same Boudin Noir as is served at Auberge Iparla in Bidarray.

It is canned, and very good. We paid 7.50 Euros for a can that is labeled 180 grams.

We didn’t have any problem bringing into the US.

Al Sharff

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The two posts above were in separate threads. I've merged the two threads.

Is this the same product I mentioned in my post last month? I suspect it is, although the cans I've seen were labeled 190 grams. I'm told they make several sizes, but it seems odd for two to be so close. Aux Lyonnais serves a boudin noir that's identified as "Iparla" on the menu. My guess is that it's also the same although I only had a bite of someone else's there.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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>I'll certainly try a can when we're next in Paris. I'm curious: is it canned in fat or >some sort of liquid?

I have to say niether. Imagine the sausage (Boudin Noir) without a casing, contained in a can.

This Boudin Noir is not a fine ground "pudding" type but has coarse ground meat.

Worth trying, and if anyone wants to bring some extra back to the US I'll be happy to take it off your hands.

Al Sharff

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Thank you, Al - so the boudin mixture is packed into cans and then these are processed. A dandy idea. (If I can use plastic wrap as casings for my cotechino, why shouldn't they use aluminum or tin or whatever the can is made of?)

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