Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Hot Sauce Topic


awbrig
 Share

Recommended Posts

I love all kinds of hot sauce except for the regular Tabasco. The chipotle style Tabasco is a lot better.

I just got a new one that I was hearing a lot about, Secret Armadillo Sauce; so far it's my all-time favorite. Hot, but not too hot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Perhaps I'm stubborn in clinging to old habits, but I'll never lose my love for regular old Tabasco. While I think siracha is being done to death at the moment, I think it still has its place, judiciously used of course.

“You can’t define these in a recipe. You can only know them...”

-- Julia Child

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do like siracha on certain things. The first time I ever had it was at my work's lunch room. I put some on my hashbrowns and it was great.

For the most part my old standby has always been Tabasco, and I imagine that will more than likely always be the case. I do like trying all kinds of hot sauces, but always come back to Tabasco.

I have this hot sauce I use on my eggs quite a bit called Tapatio. It was cheap and in a 32oz. bottle. It's not bad, but nothing special.

Another one I have in the frig that I should just throw away is called Submission. It's made with Habanero, African Oleoresin, and Scotch Bonnet. The stuff is hot, but it tastes just awful. I don't ever use it because it tastes so bad and wreaks anything I add it to because of its flavor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do like siracha on certain things. The first time I ever had it was at my work's lunch room. I put some on my hashbrowns and it was great.

For the most part my old standby has always been Tabasco, and I imagine that will more than likely always be the case. I do like trying all kinds of hot sauces, but always come back to Tabasco.

I have this hot sauce I use on my eggs quite a bit called Tapatio. It was cheap and in a 32oz. bottle. It's not bad, but nothing special.

Another one I have in the frig that I should just throw away is called Submission. It's made with Habanero, African Oleoresin, and Scotch Bonnet. The stuff is hot, but it tastes just awful. I don't ever use it because it tastes so bad and wreaks anything I add it to because of its flavor.

Sauces that are hot for the sake of being hot are just wastes of good ingredients. If you enjoy Tapatio, try Cholula...great smoky flavor with the vinegar/pepper bite.

“You can’t define these in a recipe. You can only know them...”

-- Julia Child

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do like siracha on certain things. The first time I ever had it was at my work's lunch room. I put some on my hashbrowns and it was great.

For the most part my old standby has always been Tabasco, and I imagine that will more than likely always be the case. I do like trying all kinds of hot sauces, but always come back to Tabasco.

I have this hot sauce I use on my eggs quite a bit called Tapatio. It was cheap and in a 32oz. bottle. It's not bad, but nothing special.

Another one I have in the frig that I should just throw away is called Submission. It's made with Habanero, African Oleoresin, and Scotch Bonnet. The stuff is hot, but it tastes just awful. I don't ever use it because it tastes so bad and wreaks anything I add it to because of its flavor.

Sauces that are hot for the sake of being hot are just wastes of good ingredients. If you enjoy Tapatio, try Cholula...great smoky flavor with the vinegar/pepper bite.

I completely agree. Thanks for the Cholula recommendation, I'll have to see if I can find that one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't see it mentioned - so I'll put a plug in for the yellow canned El Pato. I grew up with it on everything my mother made.

Now I use it for: Marinating chicken, on any kind of mexican food, and to dip potato chips in!

It comes in the little yellow cans for usually about 50 cents at the grocery store.

Of course, I like sriracha in scrambled eggs and in a few other dishes.

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love El Pato. When I was a kid it wasn't available in KC. My uncle in Los Angeles would send it to us by the case. My first venture into chilehead-dom. Now it's available everywhere and there's at least one can in the pantry at all times.

That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love El Pato. When I was a kid it wasn't available in KC. My uncle in Los Angeles would send it to us by the case. My first venture into chilehead-dom. Now it's available everywhere and there's at least one can in the pantry at all times.

Yes! My wife and I spent 2.5 years with the first three mini-meshuganas in India, and cases of El Pato were on the 'must pack' list.

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Check all IMPORTED hot sauces from Mexico and South America: Apparently some contain LEAD, not an ingredient that adds to the flavor or the heat.

The percentage of questionable products was only 16% but for some people this could be significant.

Of course one has to use good judgement. Since one uses very little hot sauce (as a general rule - I'm not talking about extreme chile-heads) a tiny amount of lead consumed occasionally - for normally healthy adults, is not really dangerous.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-hot-sauce-lead-levels-20130722,0,5156596.story

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure if you can get this in the US but one of my favourite hot sauces is Sambal Asli. The sauce comes from Indonesia and contains the usual suspects (chill, vinegar, sugar, salt). It is a bit more textured than Sriracha and to my taste a bit hotter. It can be found on the tables in most Warung (cafes).

sambal asli.jpg

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Check all IMPORTED hot sauces from Mexico and South America: Apparently some contain LEAD, not an ingredient that adds to the flavor or the heat.

The percentage of questionable products was only 16% but for some people this could be significant.

Of course one has to use good judgement. Since one uses very little hot sauce (as a general rule - I'm not talking about extreme chile-heads) a tiny amount of lead consumed occasionally - for normally healthy adults, is not really dangerous.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-hot-sauce-lead-levels-20130722,0,5156596.story

Noooooooooo! One of my go-to sauces is first on the list of highest lead concentration (and several of my others are the same brand). Unfortunately I eat it often enough that I should throw it all out. I'm ready to quit eating and hide in a cave.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just grabbed this on a whim at the local Hispanic meat market. It really is wonderful. Tastes of avocado, chile and lime. A touch of garlic and salt.

What really interesting is all of the kids and Mrs. Meshugana all said it reminded them of something from India. No one could place it exactly...

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1374804715.374102.jpg

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Check all IMPORTED hot sauces from Mexico and South America: Apparently some contain LEAD, not an ingredient that adds to the flavor or the heat.

The percentage of questionable products was only 16% but for some people this could be significant.

Of course one has to use good judgement. Since one uses very little hot sauce (as a general rule - I'm not talking about extreme chile-heads) a tiny amount of lead consumed occasionally - for normally healthy adults, is not really dangerous.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-hot-sauce-lead-levels-20130722,0,5156596.story

Thanks for posting this. I always have a small yellow can of El Pato in my cupboard. Not anymore! I know the story was about hot sauces, but it's likely they use the same lead-contaminated salt & pepper in the rest of their sauces, too. Better safe than sorry.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I just grabbed this on a whim at the local Hispanic meat market. It really is wonderful. Tastes of avocado, chile and lime. A touch of garlic and salt.

What really interesting is all of the kids and Mrs. Meshugana all said it reminded them of something from India. No one could place it exactly...

attachicon.gifImageUploadedByTapatalk1374804715.374102.jpg

This reminds me of when I was on vacation in Mexico with my brother and sister-in-law, and we stopped at this roadside taco stand for lunch. They had squeeze bottles of sauces on the table, and my sister-in-law thought the green one was guacamole. Whoops.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recently picked up a few kinds of portugese piri piri and am loving them. One is made in NJ and pretty expensive - Mazi's. The other, I picked up in new bedford, MA, and is very similar for about 1/8 the price. They're moderately spicy, oily, and very salty. It tastes like a fermented pepper sauce with capers in it. I haven't had nando's for years, but I don't remember it being anything like this... perhaps the south african and portugese recipes diverged a lot over time.

I'm going to have to buy a few bottles next time I'm in MA, since the first one I got there didn't last long.

El Yucateco is definitely my go to sauce, though lately I've been using salsa habañera chimay de tabasco black and enjoying it a lot. I buy it online from a guy in texas who imports it. Black (mild, according to that seller) is the only jar I have open, and it's heat is easily on par with el yucateco.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...

Perhaps the hot sauce aficionados here might like to know about Heat, a relatively new shop in Berkeley that specializes in hot sauce (they carry about 300 varieties from all over the world plus local-made sauces) and other fiery foods.

 

http://heathotsauce.com/ - main page

 

http://heathotsauceonline.com/ - shop on line

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Now if people would only get a clue about Huy Fong's far superior Chili Garlic Sauce...

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 years later...

I maybe posted this before but 12 pages!  i have recently become re-enamored with the Huy Fong chili-garlic. Forget sriracha - that is nice but like catsup. In am fond of many different hot sauces but this very fresh tasting one has reinserted itself into my kitchen.  

hot sauce.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a longtime staple of mine. I don't use it so much any more, because my GF has been losing her taste for chili heat, but I still love it.

  • Like 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried some Cholula Chipotle hot sauce at a local Mexican place and it was a nice blend of sweet and not too much heat. I'm not into super hot sauce, it was just a nice little extra flavor on some chips/guac. Bought a bottle at the local supermarket.

  • Like 1

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I keep returning to two hot sauces:

Mad Dog Liquid Fire

Cajun Sunshine 

 

Mad Dog Liquid fire is a very hot Peri Peri pepper sauce with a fantastic taste but I use in small quantity due to the heat.

 

Cajun Sunshine is a sauce I use in larger quantities. I describe it as a cayenne pepper sauce with seeds which is hotter than Tabasco 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By SobaAddict70
      I LOVE pickled ginger. In fact, in some instances, moreso than sushi or sashimi itself. When I was first introduced to sushi, it was my least favorite part of a sushi meal. Now it's the opposite.
      Besides sushi/sashimi, what other uses for pickled ginger are there? And how do you make your own? What goes in the pickling solution? Fresh pickled ginger (not premade) is undyed and a pale beige in color, whereas the premade version is a slight tawny pink.
      Any suggestions?
      Soba
    • By Smarmotron
      What sorts of mustards do you like? The type of mustard I like is pungent without a hint of sweetness (fie upon honey mustards), but not too vinegary. Inglehoffer's Stone Ground tends to be rather good, but it's got a little too much vinegar (overpowers the taste of the mustard). What sorts of mustards do you like? Any brands? Or do you make your own?
    • By Eldictator
      Any ideas on how I could put a honey centre in a jelly pastille
    • By Keith Orr
      Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce (Habenero Hot Sauce)
      I thought I'd submit my recipe which is a clone of a locally available sauce here in Portland OR called Secret Aardvark Sauce.
      Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce
      1 – 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes or roasted tomatoes chopped - include the juice
      1 – 14.5 oz of rice wine vinegar. Use the now empty tomato can to measure
      1-1/2 cups of peeled and grated carrots (packed into the measuring cup)
      1 cup of finely diced white onion
      1/4 cup of yellow mustard
      1/3 cup of sugar
      2 teaspoons of Morton’s Kosher Salt
      1 teaspoon of black pepper
      13 small Habaneros – seeded and membranes removed. (This was 2 oz. of Habaneros before cutting off the tops and removing the seeds and membranes)
      2 teaspoons curry powder
      1 cup of water when cooking
      5 or 6 cloves of garlic - roasted if you've got it
      Put it all in the crockpot on high until everything is tender. About 3 hours  Note: I used the crockpot so I don't have to worry about scorching it while it cooks. 
      Whirl in food processor – Don’t puree until smooth – make it lightly/finely chunky.
      Makes 3 pints - To can process pint jars in a water bath canner for 15 minutes
      I've thought about making this with peaches or mangoes too, but haven't tried it yet.
       
      Edited for clarity on 11/9/2020
       
      Keywords: Hot and Spicy, Carribean, Condiment, Sauce, Easy, Food Processor
      ( RG2003 )
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...