• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

awbrig

The Hot Sauce Topic

295 posts in this topic

I suppose it doesnt count as a hot sauce, but its spicy (if you get the spicy version, that is), so I am gonna have to give a shout out to Stubbs barbecue sauce.  Anything you might have a desire to put ketchup on, Stubbs is better.

You should join the 'I Love Stubbs' club, see link:

click for the I Love Stubbs Club!

"...don't cost nothing - except a love for great barbeque..."


...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our current favourites are

Kaitaia Fire Hot sauces ( a selection )

Rattlesnake jalapeno jam and ancho chilli jam

Bufalo chipotle sauce

Tapatio

El Yucateco Habanero sauce

Dr Hots Chili chutney

:)

Organic Chile sauces here if anyone is interested Kaitaia Fire

They also have pickled garlic/walnuts and peppers and manuka smoked Jalapenos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Organic chile sauce? You know, that would never occur to me. I mean, compared to a good chile sauce what harm can a bit of weed killer do you? :laugh:


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll add a second vote for Marie Sharp's of Belize. their red sauces are based on carrot juice and habanero's. They also have a green sauce that's based on prickly pera juice and green habanero's - th elatter is mild and tasty on nearly anything. Both include some caye lime juice - adds to the unique taste.

I'm surprised that Matouk's is tough to find in NYC - that must apply only to Manhattan as it's a staple in any West Indian community. I especially like the green one that looks almost like a thick marmalade or chutney with little chunks of yellow, red and orange mixed in. It's flavorful but absolutely blistering.

I'd guess that nearly all the sauces discussed in this thread and several thousand more are available in my hometown of Syracuse at the Hot Shoppe. They also have an online store - selection is mind boggling

Hot Shoppe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sriracha is my ketchup. (Fringe benefit - there's no tomatos in it, so when you dribble it all over your shirt, it'll rinse out in a mall bathroom.) They make a couple of heats - green-cap and yellow-cap.

Inner Beauty is way cool. Pineapple base, I think, with habanero.

Frank's makes for mild wings.

Tabasco Habanero is tasty as all get-out.

I don't like datil-pepper sauces.

Um - try finding a recipe for habanero mustard. I've made it myself, and it'll knock your socks off on a dog.

Jalapenos, when ripe-red, taste entirely different and are worth looking for - much sweeter.

Homemade habanero ketchup *swoon*.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just caught this thread, awbrig. You've hit on a subject that is near and dear to my heart. I have a wall in my pantry that I call the wall of flame. There's well over 100 bottles displayed there( sorry no picture I don't have digital camera). Right now I'm into el yucteco chipolte sauce, wonderful smokey flavor. As far as the tabasco chipolte, I bought it at Shoprite a few weeks ago. There's a good website www.peppers.com that probably has between 500 -1000 sauces. They also have store in Rehobooth beach De.


I'm a NYC expat. Since coming to the darkside, as many of my freinds have said, I've found that most good things in NYC are made in NJ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy Man. My mouth and lips are on total fire right now. This is very very uncomfortable. I purchased a bottle of Dave's Insanity sauce this afternoon and put 4 drops total on 2 pieces of Connie's pizza. Holy Crap is this stuff hot...and causes pain like you can't believe...Im sweating...

What cools a mouth down?...I heard milk and that you shouldn't swish your mouth out w water...anyone have anymore tips... :shock:

PS...read this guys experience w this sauce...this stuff is dangerous!

http://www.epinions.com/content_20390514308

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yoghurt does the trick too there is an enzyme in milk that breaks down the capsacin ( sp? )

hence the presence of raitas with indian food to counter all that spicy stuff! Correct me if I am wrong suvir :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What cools a mouth down?...I heard milk and that you shouldn't swish your mouth out w water...anyone have anymore tips... :shock:

There's a contingent on the ChileHeads list that swear by bananas to knock down the heat... firesmile.gif


=Mark

Give a man a fish, he eats for a Day.

Teach a man to fish, he eats for Life.

Teach a man to sell fish, he eats Steak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

never heard bananas...Ill try that out...

Mark what are your favorite hot sauces?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So, anyone else try Dave's???

Heh, heh. Oh yeah. My dad made a chicken burrito once after we went out on the town drinking and put just a shitload of Dave's on it, probably about 6 or 7 bottle shakes of the anal drano. Of course he took one bite and gave it directly to me. After a bite or two, I say embarassingly: "Dad, this is pretty hot, what did you put on this?" "Oh, just this one." "Dad! That's Dave's! Fuck!"

I finished it and was happy to do so. Though the next day wasn't too pretty.

Have you tried Dave's Insanity Salsa? or Dave's Hurtin' Habenero? Both are quite good and the salsa makes the best gaucamole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

im going to try the salsa...is it worth the 7$ for a small jar?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless you are a glutten for punishment, yes, it does last a long time. You don't need very much, it's just as hot as the hot sauce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not make your own or buy the brand that you like and add the amount of Dave's that suits your taste?


I'm a NYC expat. Since coming to the darkside, as many of my freinds have said, I've found that most good things in NYC are made in NJ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why not make your own or buy the brand that you like and add the amount of Dave's that suits your taste?

Gee, that sounds like extra work. :wacko::wacko:

However, when I do make my own salsa, or more to the point, pico de gallo, I try only to use fresh peppers but occasionally I'll throw in a commercial ass burner if I'm feeling lazy.

ediot: splelnig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What cools a mouth down?...

Sugar.

And, it's readily available. Remember that the next time you're sitting at a restaurant and your mouth is on fire.

In a small dish in the middle of the table is a little packet that holds the remedy.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave's sauces/salsas are just about my upper limit on heat - after that, they're talking 'additives' versus sauce. Yeah, we've had some adventures with sauces - usually after drinking just enough to get stupid and daring.

Bananas? Huh....... might work.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah yes, hot sauce, one of my faaaavorite subjects. My personal faves are...

Endorphin Rush (very tomatoey, VERY hot)

grendosc.jpg

Scorned Woman (black pepper, vinegar)

ohswsc.jpg

Tennessee Sunshine (lots of vinegar, mild, good with eggs)

Lawyer's Breath (very garlicky, mild)

lawyersc.jpg

Pain is Good, Batch 137 (garlicky, carroty, very hot -- my favorite)

pain37sc.jpg

I fear Crazy Jerry's Mustard Gas -- I have a bottle, and it honestly feels like someone poured acid down your throat... the stuff BURNS. Different than normal pepper heat.

musgassc.jpg

Big thumbs up for Sriracha, Tapatio, and Pickapeppa as well -- good flavoring agents for the wife, who doesn't like really hot sauces ;)

-s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Habanero Piri-Piri anyone?

200210176291465851117457.jpg

My buddy Joe showed up with a bagful of Habaneros the other day, so I slowly simmered them in oil until they completely wilted, then strained the peppers out.

Guess what Joe's getting for Christmas. :biggrin:

It's hot. 3 to 5 drops in a bowl of mild chili is plenty. Too much for Mrs. Shiva, really hot for me, and just right for my friend chile-head Steve. He was wiping his eyes a lot, so I asked him if he was crying. "No, but my eyelids are sweating." was his reply. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Real men put Tabasco Sauce on everything. My brother, and some of my friends are Tabasco hating wimps (these are the same jerks that don't like onions with their food... I know, I'm not proud of it). Anyway, for those of you that don't know (because you're communists), Tabasco Sauce is a hot sauce made of red capsicum peppers, salt and vinegar.

The peppers are crushed, put in jars with vinegar and salt for a month or so, and then stirred for about another month or so. The result? A kickass sauce to put on anything. Here is what I suggest putting Tabasco sauce on:

Everything

Tabasco sauce goes best with everything, and plenty of it. If you happen to be sharing a meal with a Tabasco hating pussy, be sure to load it up with Tabasco and onions (they hate that). You have to be real stern with these type of people. You have to act real tough and manly around them so they feel intimidated, and it helps you feel better about yourself. If they start to bitch and moan about you being "too mean", tell them you're insecure about yourself, and that making fun of others makes you feel better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as the super hot sauces I prefer Mild to Wild's Backdraft Hotsauce.

abq9.jpg

Jim Campbell grows and processes his own chiles and is one of few growers licenced to grow Red Savina Habaneros, the hottest! This sauce really packs a wollop, but does not have the "singed cat hair" aftertaste that many of the extract based sauces have.

foodtv_bnr.gif


=Mark

Give a man a fish, he eats for a Day.

Teach a man to fish, he eats for Life.

Teach a man to sell fish, he eats Steak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I picked up Dave's Salsa today and had some with Blue Corn chips before our homemade tacos. This salsa is terribly hot, almost as hot as the sauce. You certainly can't put much on a chip unless you want to have major pain. I drank 2 full glasses of milk while sampling it... The taste is great though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The peppers are crushed, put in jars with vinegar and salt for a month or so, and then stirred for about another month or so.

Actually, I beg to differ awbrig. According to their website and what I had heard years past

The pepper mash is allowed to ferment and age for up to three years in white oak barrels

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok, Im easy...

but I could be right since your quote says up to 3 years and I said a few months which is within that timeframe :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      One of my local supermarkets recently installed a sesame seed pressing facility and is now producing sesame oil and sesame paste. Their equipment toasts and extracts the oil and the residue is turned into the paste. Of course, I bought some of each.
       
      I have only used the oil so far. It tastes and smells more intensely than any I have bought before. The aroma also seems to last longer in a dish.
       

       
      These are the white seed versions. They also do black seed oil and paste which I haven't bought yet.
       
      Neither has any brand label - only a bar code on the back so that the check-out staff can deal with it.
       
      I am sorely tempted to try this recipe from Carolyn Philips for celtuce with sesame oil, paste and seeds. I'll let you know how I get on with this or any other recipe. Suggestions welcome, as always.
    • By sartoric
      I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious.
       
      In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste.

       
      Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes.

       
      In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds.   

       
      Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute.

       
      Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey).

       
      Fry until golden, another minute or so.

       
      Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. 

       
      Lower the heat and add the  blender contents.

       
      Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency.
       
      Ta da !

    • By HoneyMustard
      Pennstation's Honey Mustard taste so good, but they don't sell it in stores like Big Boy Frisch's sells their tartar sauce.

      I am assuming they buy it in bulk from a certain name brand. Does anyone know what that brand is or at least a similar Honey Mustard recipe?
    • By Darienne
      Pannukakku has become a new favorite in the McAuley household. (LCBO Food & Wine, winter season 2016).  We've been using Maple Syrup...made with DH's help in a local sugar shack...but the recipe actually calls for birch syrup.

      Does anyone know where to buy it in Ontario?  Any grocery stores carry it?  Specialty stores?  Toronto? What about in the Cambridge/Kitchener/Waterloo area?
       
      Thanks.
    • By cyalexa
      Salsa Para Enchiladas  
      3 ancho chiles
      2 New Mexico chiles
      2 chipotle chiles
      1 clove garlic, sliced
      2 TB flour
      2 TB vegetable oil
      1 tsp vinegar
      ¾ tsp salt
      ¼ tsp dried oregano
      2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid
      Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.