• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

awbrig

The Hot Sauce Topic

295 posts in this topic

I love hot sauces...Im always curious as to what are the great ones since there are so many to choose from...

Right now I have...

Cholula's (w a wooden top)

Tabasaco Habanero

Tabasco Chipotle

Heaven on SevenHeavenly Blend

Emeril's Red Pepper Sauce

Frank's Red Hot

I like it hot but not way way way too hot you cant taste anything...what are your suggestions! Ive always wanted to try Dave's line and that call me sally stuff...what do you guys recommend that I run out and get NOW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use Huy Fong, which I first noticed at certain Vietnamese pho places on the West Coast. It comes in a non-squeeze container as well, and is generally available in Chinatown.

http://hotsaucecatalog.com/hs1223.html

Huy Fong has a sampler pack you can order for I think 7.50. Its a great deal:

http://www.huyfong.com/no_frames/sample.htm


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jamaican Pik-A-Pepper


Kitchen Kutie

"I've had jutht about enough outta you!"--Daffy Duck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i like siracha(sp) i have to check the spelling. It is asian i believe and it is red and has a rooster on teh plastic squeeze bottle. Its kind of spicy but not to bad but i think it has preety good flavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also use the (Huy Fong) Sriracha. It seems popular w/egulleters. :) I've noticed that sushi joints use it as well, in the spicy tuny/salmon.

I have a bottle of Frank's, but haven't used it in a while.

I also have chipotle powder and dried anchos hiding in the cubbard somewhere (although I knwo that wasn't the question.)


-Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sriracha indeed makes the world go 'round, and brings the world together as well. i haven't noticed it in the spicy rolls at sushi places, although that's what i use when making spicy rolls at home (mixed with mayo).

franks still rules for wings. it's as simple as that.

pik-a-pepper, as shermar mentions, is a good product. they have a really good steak sauce as well. it's a shame the bottles are only about 2 ounces though. i go through the stuff like water.

i also use sambal, which is a bit garlic-y and has pieces of dried read pepper in it. a bit more of a kick than sriracha.

jayask: 3 demerits for answering the wrong question. come back tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know who makes it but look for "Bad Girls in Heat" hot sauce. It's pretty mild just lending a little kick to fish, meat and vegetables. Even hot sauce wimps like this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ones I keep going back to are Cholula and Frank's. I use them on pretty much anything and everything. We also always have a bottle of hot oil (my name for any brand of spicy sesame oil) on hand for stir fries and dishes that don't call for a tomato-based flavor.

Mr. bushey likes the scotch bonnet pepper sauces and mustard based hot sauces, but I'm blanking on the names right now.

Every once in a while I browse through the housewares department at TJ Maxx or Marshall's and pick up a bottle or two I've never tried before, just for fun. The condiment company Jasmine & Bread used to have a Caribbean hot sauce that was unbelievable, but I don't know if they make it anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i like siracha(sp) i have to check the spelling. It is asian i believe and it is red and has a rooster on teh plastic squeeze bottle. Its kind of spicy but not to bad but i think it has preety good flavor.

chop -- That's Huy Fong. You might want to review the linked webpage from my earlier post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sauces.jpg

=Mark

Give a man a fish, he eats for a Day.

Teach a man to fish, he eats for Life.

Teach a man to sell fish, he eats Steak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I do not find it spicy, I like Louisiana Hot Sauce as a general all-purpose sauce. It has a great flavor for food.

I also like Sriracha and always have it on hand.

My favorite Mexican restaurant has two sauces that I love but cannot recall the name. They are both habanero, but one is red and the other bright green. They come in identical small bottles with the name in red letters. If anyone knows the name of these, I would appreciate it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was actually the "Sauce Tasting Bar" at a "Hotluck" sponsored by the ChileHeads in Red Lion, Pa last year.

My current favorite Hotsauce is Hoboken Eddies Mean Green. Roasted jalabenos and spices with a touch of lime. Mmmmmm.

Also like siracha, but when it comes to a cayenne style sauce like Tabasco or Crystal, I have to defer to Tapatio. More heat and more flavor than the others, and at 79 cents a bottle is a bargain also...


=Mark

Give a man a fish, he eats for a Day.

Teach a man to fish, he eats for Life.

Teach a man to sell fish, he eats Steak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My favorite Mexican restaurant has two sauces that I love but cannot recall the name.  They are both habanero, but one is red and the other bright green.  They come in identical small bottles with the name in red letters.  If anyone knows the name of these, I would appreciate it.

El Yucateco. I'm looking at a bottle of the green as we speak...


=Mark

Give a man a fish, he eats for a Day.

Teach a man to fish, he eats for Life.

Teach a man to sell fish, he eats Steak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Although I do not find it spicy, I like Louisiana Hot Sauce as a general all-purpose sauce.  It has a great flavor for food.  

I also like Sriracha and always have it on hand.

My favorite Mexican restaurant has two sauces that I love but cannot recall the name.  They are both habanero, but one is red and the other bright green.  They come in identical small bottles with the name in red letters.  If anyone knows the name of these, I would appreciate it.

El Yucateco? Made with habaneros? Hot stuff.

http://www.elyucateco.com/english/flash.htm

Tapatio is also common in Mexican restaurants.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer anything from Blair's to what Dave's Gourmet puts out...they have a nice progressive range of heat levels through their 'Death Sauce' line and a new line of products called 'Heat' that offer less bite and a lot more interesting flavors...they also make the best high end super-Scoville stuff that you may or may not be able to handle.

Link at:

Extreme Foods - Blair's Death Sauce

There are also several people who sell Blair's on eBay and I can frequently find decent prices on larger sampler packs there.

If you like Cholula and some of the other Mex-style sauces like Bufalo, try the Frontera products from Bayless. A quick look at his website only list 2 hot sauces now, so I'm guessing they pared there line down as there used to be several more. Possibly you can find some leftovers on clearance somewhere, I know I have.

The mail order hot sauce outfit Mo Hotta Mo Betta also has a decent line of sauces for a variety of tastes, and offer a decent catalog of other sauces - reliable. decent customer service. Check their site at:

Click for Mo Hotta Mo Betta

Other companies w/ reliable lines: Cafe Tequila, Oak Hill Farms and the three 'Pain is Good' hot sauces.

On a final note, another line I've not sampled but that looks interesting is the Toad Sweat line of desert hot sauces. They have 3 flavor in ascending heat level: Lemon Vanilla, Chocolate Orange, Cranberry and Key Lime. All pick up their heat from habeneros...check their site at:

Click for Toad Sweat Desert Sauces

My favorite Mexican restaurant has two sauces that I love but cannot recall the name. They are both habanero, but one is red and the other bright green. They come in identical small bottles with the name in red letters. If anyone knows the name of these, I would appreciate it.

And as everyone else said, El Yucateco...they look like this:

Click for El Yucateco


...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yet another Huy Fong Sriracha user here, but also something of a fan of the Belizian Marie Sharp's, which I use as a condiment with just about anything.

Looking in the cupboard just now I discovered I also have an as-yet unopened bottle of a South African hot sauce I was given, pleasingly called Dog's Bum Sauce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sriracha indeed makes the world go 'round, and brings the world together as well.

Tommy - good line and I agree.

The Tabasco Chipotle is one of the best new hot sauce products I've tasted recently. Between the smoke and the spice, this sauce complements a variety of dishes. Especially like some on poached or shirred eggs.

I think my pantry has 46 different types - but I'm not counting. :laugh:


Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found a great new Trinidad/Tobago hot pepper sauce in St. Maarten called Matouk's that I brought back with me. It comes in various heat levels, and is mighty tasty. They use it with ribs on the island as a condiment.

298.gif


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sriracha indeed makes the world go 'round, and brings the world together as well.

Tommy - good line and I agree.

The Tabasco Chipotle is one of the best new hot sauce products I've tasted recently. Between the smoke and the spice, this sauce complements a variety of dishes. Especially like some on poached or shirred eggs.

I think my pantry has 46 different types - but I'm not counting. :laugh:

The Tabasco Chipotle is excellent, but isnt it still an internet-only product now? I have 2 bottles at home, its great stuff.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toad Sweat is the bomb!!! I tasted it at the Fancy Food Show this summer. The Lemon-Vanilla is pretty tame, but the Key Lime-Habanero? AH-HOOOOOOOOOOOOO-AH! :wacko::biggrin:

And Matouk's is available in supermarkets near me -- the Pathmark under the Manhattan Bridge has that and other Caribbean sauces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Tabasco Chipotle is excellent, but isnt it still an internet-only product now? I have 2 bottles at home, its great stuff.

I'm not sure.

I first had it a local Tex-Mex on Staten Island. They sold me a bottle for $5. Then I ordered six on-line from Tabasco at less than $3 each. I also ordered the garlic Tobasco - it's very good as well.

I've never seen it in local stores and they don't carry it in The Kitchen on 7th Avenue.


Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Tabasco Chipotle is excellent, but isnt it still an internet-only product now? I have 2 bottles at home, its great stuff.

Tabasco's site claims it's available internet, mail-order or select markets:

Atlanta, Georgia

Chicago, Illinois

Dallas, Texas

Denver, Colorado

Gainesville, Florida

Houston, Texas

Jacksonville, Florida

Las Vegas, Nevada

Los Angeles, California

Miami, Florida

New Orleans, Louisiana

Phoenix, Arizona

Portland, Oregon

St. Augustine, Florida

St. Petersburg, Florida

San Antonio, Texas

San Diego, California

Seattle, Washington

Spokane, Washington

Tampa, Florida

But promises it will be coming soon to a retailer near you.


...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toad Sweat is the bomb!!!  I tasted it at the Fancy Food Show this summer.  The Lemon-Vanilla is pretty tame, but the Key Lime-Habanero?  AH-HOOOOOOOOOOOOO-AH! :wacko:  :biggrin:

It does look quite intriguing.

I'm very interested...unfortunately the closest retailer is 90 miles away, so I'll have to wait for my big Christmas time mail order spree to try it.


...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jason, I will have to pass on your fondness for the Matouk's to my wife. We went to Anguilla a few years ago, and she thought I was insane when I brought home half a dozen bottles of the stuff. Oddly enough (or maybe not considering the demographics), it is much easier to find Matouks and similar styles in London, than in NY.

I suppose it doesnt count as a hot sauce, but its spicy (if you get the spicy version, that is), so I am gonna have to give a shout out to Stubbs barbecue sauce. Anything you might have a desire to put ketchup on, Stubbs is better.


Thomas Secor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Darienne
      Pannukakku has become a new favorite in the McAuley household. (LCBO Food & Wine, winter season 2016).  We've been using Maple Syrup...made with DH's help in a local sugar shack...but the recipe actually calls for birch syrup.

      Does anyone know where to buy it in Ontario?  Any grocery stores carry it?  Specialty stores?  Toronto? What about in the Cambridge/Kitchener/Waterloo area?
       
      Thanks.
    • By cyalexa
      Salsa Para Enchiladas  
      3 ancho chiles
      2 New Mexico chiles
      2 chipotle chiles
      1 clove garlic, sliced
      2 TB flour
      2 TB vegetable oil
      1 tsp vinegar
      ¾ tsp salt
      ¼ tsp dried oregano
      2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid
      Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
    • By JAZ
      In this topic on sweet potato salad, Jaymes said (about mayonnaise):
      I have to disagree: while some cooks here in Atlanta use it, most that I know prefer Hellman's. I certainly do. Duke's is oddly sweet -- halfway to Miracle Whip, in my opinion -- and I can pick it out immediately in things like tuna or potato salad when it's used. If I were faced with the choice of Duke's or nothing on a sandwich, I think I'd have to choose the latter.
      Am I missing something? Do people really like Duke's? Are there other brands worth trying?
    • By Jambalyle
      Hi!
      Before we launched our project, I followed Melissa's remodel thread (congrats Melissa) and links to other kitchen remodel threads and I am continually awed by the inspiration and recommendations offered by the eGullet community during those projects. I want to get a piece of that action during our remodel.
      Demolition began on June 20, with an estimated 6-month project duration. The impetus for our remodel was the addition of a master bedroom and bath to transform our tiny 2 BR 1 BA into a modest 3BR 2BA. In addition, we are transforming and expanding the back of the house to create a "great" room that will combine a new kitchen, dining and family room.
      I will post plans and initial pictures in a subsequent post to give everyone a sense of the scope of our project. But first...
      Yesterday, we met (again) with our kitchen designers and appliance people to hammer out our appliance wants, needs, and desires. Here is where we netted out:
      Range – Wolf 48” R486C (6 burner, grill), w/ Island trim (is trim necessary?)
      Hood – Independent 27” x 54” Incline INHL54SS (w/ heat lamps)
      Blower – Independent CFMR1400 (external)
      Dishwasher – Miele Platinum edition G2150SCSS
      Microwave – GE Monogram 1.0 CF Stainless ZEM200SF
      Refrigerator – GE Monogram 42” built-in Stainless w/dispenser – ZISS420DRSS
      Beverage Center – GE Monogram 24” Stainless ZDBC240NBS (we're not willing to pay $600 more for privacy glass feature!)
      Sink – Franke 30”x18”x9” Stainless under mount
      Anyway... we would love to get some reaction to our selections before they hit the SOLD key on the cash register! Thanks! -Lyle
      PS: I know the Wolf is wimpy at 16,000 BTU per burner, but are there other reasons I should reconsider?
    • By JohnT
      For those folk who have access to a fig tree or two, here is a recipe for Green Fig Preserve inherited from my fathers recipes. The resulting product is magic on buttered toast and with cheese. The figs must be picked before they ripen and soften.
      Whole Green Fig Preserve
      Ingredients:
      100 green figs
      2 tablespoons bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
      3.4 litres water
      Method:
      Scrub the figs and cut a cross into the end opposite the stalk.
      Mix the water and bicarbonate of soda and soak the figs overnight.
      Remove from the water and weigh the figs, recording the weight.
      Place into clean boiling water and boil for 15 minutes or until just soft.
      Drain and then dry the figs well, removing excess water.
      Syrup:
      For each 500g figs or part thereof, mix 500ml water with 500g sugar.
      Boil the syrup until it just starts to thicken.
      Add the figs and boil until the syrup is thick.
      Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice for each 250g figs and just bring to the boil again before removing from the heat and letting cool.
      Bottle the figs and cover with the syrup.
      Note 1: If the syrup froths whilst boiling, add a small lump of butter.
      Note 2: A small stick of ginger can be added during the boiling process to add a slightly different flavour.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.