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Texas Thanksgiving traditions


lovebenton0
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We have such a widely varied culinary heritage here in Texas, as we explored a bit last winter at our Austin eG TX Heritage pot luck. :cool: So, for Thanksgiving, what ultimately means tradition to you?

I've got cornbread in the oven at this very moment to set aside, break up and dry out for dressing on Thursday. To serve with the turkey. I do that every year.

Sweet potatoes? You bet, with plantains and pecans.

Acorn squash stuffed with wild and brown rice/apricots/pecans.

I guess I can't be in TX without a glut of pecans for Thanksgiving! :raz::laugh:

What Thanksgiving traditions do you follow?

Or are you building your own?

And we'd love to see pics from everybody, wouldn't we? :wink:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Cornbread dressing goes back several generations. I finally "wrote up" the basics that my mother made for years. Of course, she changed it just a bit every year.

For a few years, my mother would make a Waldorf salad, with pecans, of course.

The sweet potatoes would often have pecans.

Mother's potato salad. It was made with a mayo dressing with a little mustard and the "secret"... celery seeds. I don't think she ever put pecans in that. :biggrin:

Pecan pie. (Are you seeing a theme here?)

Oh yeah... The really stupid relilsh tray that was rarely molested. Well... except maybe for the pimento cheese stuffed celery. The separate platter or two of deviled eggs went fast.

There won't be any pictures this year. My sister and I went on strike. Nephew has to take us to the buffet at the yacht club... That is if we don't have to buy a yacht to get there! (Rain, rain, go away.)

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Cornbread dressing goes back several generations. I finally "wrote up" the basics that my mother made for years. Of course, she changed it just a bit every year.

For a few years, my mother would make a Waldorf salad, with pecans, of course.

The sweet potatoes would often have pecans.

Mother's potato salad. It was made with a mayo dressing with a little mustard and the "secret"... celery seeds. I don't think she ever put pecans in that.  :biggrin:

Pecan pie. (Are you seeing a theme here?)

Oh yeah... The really stupid relilsh tray that was rarely molested. Well... except maybe for the pimento cheese stuffed celery. The separate platter or two of deviled eggs went fast.

There won't be any pictures this year. My sister and I went on strike. Nephew has to take us to the buffet at the yacht club... That is if we don't have to buy a yacht to get there! (Rain, rain, go away.)

Aaaah nuts, fifi! :raz::laugh:

We'll nail you down next year! Maybe you'll repeat that tamale stuffed turkey? I may have to try that one myself for next year! :biggrin:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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I have started to vary from my grandma's traditional stuffed turkey in the last few years. I much prefer my turkey smoked.

However I still make her stuffing, and call it dressing. Cornbread and biscuit, with pecans. I make her giblet gravy, but with the smoked drippings. ( its Crack!)

Other than that I'm going basic. Green beans with almonds and bacon drippings,

Garnet sweet potatoes with brown sugar and butter. I might sneak some chipotle in there when no one is looking. Cranbery-orange-jalepeno relish. I'll be the only one eating that. Mashed taters. Chocolate mousse pie. :wub::wub::wub: The Monster-not-in-law is bringing her pecan pie. Oh. And some cranberry jello salad thing. I'll put sage leaves and more bacon drippings with salt, pepper and whatever else seems right at the time, under the skin of the bird. Then season the skin. Crap. I forgot to pick up rolls. I'll prolly get some hawian rolls or maybe those frozen dough ones. Its only 3 of us, so I'm not going to go all out.

Wine. Lots of wine throughout the day. How else to deal with certain relatives......

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Doing a new thing with the turkey here -- I've smoked 'em :wub: and roasted 'em :wub: -- this year will be roasted again, but using a recipe from Country Collections Cookbook, written by the good ladies in Monroe LA (which is where my MIL will be staying at home this year, as opposed to visiting here). Idea came from Mayhaw Man, who swears by it, so it's bound to be good. :biggrin: Turkey so appropriately mixes in with our mixed heritage household -- my mr was born in Monroe.

I'll post some pics of that as it goes along. I've never covered one in EVOO saturated cheesecloth before so this will be interesting. First, in a couple hours I'll get it out of the fridge and rub inside and out with a paste of EVOO, s&p, Worcestershire sauce, dry mustard and vinegar. Then return covered and let it be until tomorrow morning.

The sponge for white rolls and bread is working on itself now.

Sweet potatoes, plantains and pecans are done, acorn squash is partially pre-baked and ready to be stuffed with wild rice and apricots tomorrow. Cornbread for dressing is broken and drying.

gallery_12550_164_1101304995.jpg

So it begins, I've got plenty more to do yet.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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I always reply on this thread for two reasons; 1) I am much more familiar with this style of cooking in general, excepting the Sonoran desert style , and 2) There's no one else up here to talk about food with.

Anyway, today the fire pit's getting heated up for the bird in the ground. We built the pit last weekend and burned a couple piles of wood in it. I will be at the Foodbank today for sometime, but DH is going to stoke it up. That turkey will go in the ground this evening.

For the oven turkey, I am still on the fence...meaning I've been seriously considering using up my last frozen tamale stash to stuff ala fifi. I have till this evening for that, too. I'm leaning seriously pro-fifi.

Baked squash with feral pig and hot Italian sausage

Two pies: 1 pecan and 1 mincemeat

Cornbread and sourdough dressing on the side this year

Appetizers as discussed on the SFA thread.

Pickles of cucumbers,onions and mushrooms

Devilled eggs

Smashed taters, green beans, etc., etc.

I'll do this tonight for it to be done in the morning. DH will get home, we'll scarf, watch parade, go serve downtown, come home, watch bowls or whatever(there's a lot of good movies tomrrow) and relax while I figure out how to fit this in fridge. Oh, I forgot that both our litle ole landlady and another tenant are housebound this year, so they'll have plates.

The end of my turkey day will be the pit turkey re-entering the outside world. He will immediately give up some meat, then get prepared for extended duty till the next holiday. But one thing that never gets wasted is the broth in the bottom of the package. It gets used almost immediately.

Salud, youall! Blessings, best wishes---go safely to and from your Holidays, and mostly, ENJOY! :smile:

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Dear Lord, Judith! That buffet had better be good. Please take a picture of your rolls. I need another dose of deep intimidation. The effect of your biscuit pictures is beginning to wear off. :laugh:

I thought of a new Texas tradition that was inspired by this thread. I was discussing the situation with the nephew last night. He just got a new smoker.

To save you some time and to summarize... hollywood was asking for tips on smoking a turkey and a brisket. I have a Weber bullet and suggested that, while you would normally think about putting the turkey on the top rack and the brisket on the bottom (assuming that the turkey would come off first), why not reverse it? Put the turkey under the brisket. A smoked turkey basted in brisket fat! What could be more Texas than that? The more we thought about it the better we liked it.

Now what if we stuffed that bird with tamales? Positioned it so some of the juices would get into the cavity?

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I would dearly love to smoke the turkey, but spouseperson thinks smoked turkey tastes like ham. She likes ham, but thinks that turkey ought to taste like turkey. Very narrow minded on that topic. She’s probably right (about the ham taste), and that’s probably why I like it so well :raz:.

Anyway, more or less conventional oven roasted turkey with some butter and tarragon seasoning tucked in, potatoes au gratin (my son’s favorite dish, which he called “potatoes all rotten” when he was a little guy), mashed potatoes (I'm thinking garlic for this year), green beans fixed somehow or ’nother (undecided on that one), deviled eggs as far as the eye can see (mine will have salmon roe on them), olives of several descriptions, sweet gherkins, celery stuffed with jalapeno/pimento cheese, mushroom caps stuffed with cream cheese, bacon and shrimp, Granny's cheddar biscuits, and my beloved pecan pie. I’m getting really hungry just writing this :^). Happy Thanksgiving to all.

THW

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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I always reply on this thread for two reasons; 1) I am much more familiar with this style of cooking in general, excepting the Sonoran desert style , and 2) There's no one else up here to talk about food with.

Anyway, today the fire pit's getting heated up for the bird in the ground. We built the pit last weekend and burned a couple piles of wood in it. I will be at the Foodbank today for sometime, but DH is going to stoke it up. That turkey will go in the ground this evening. 

For the oven turkey, I am still on the fence...meaning I've been seriously considering using up my last frozen tamale stash to stuff ala fifi. I have till this evening for that, too. I'm leaning seriously pro-fifi.

Baked squash with feral pig and hot Italian sausage

Two pies: 1 pecan and 1 mincemeat

Cornbread and sourdough dressing on the side this year

Appetizers as discussed on the SFA thread.

Pickles of cucumbers,onions and mushrooms

Devilled eggs

Smashed taters, green beans, etc., etc.

I'll do this tonight for it to be done in the morning. DH will get home, we'll scarf, watch parade, go serve downtown, come home, watch bowls or whatever(there's a lot of good movies tomrrow) and relax while I figure out how to fit this in fridge. Oh, I forgot that both our litle ole landlady and another tenant are housebound this year, so they'll have plates.

The end of my turkey day will be the pit turkey re-entering the outside world. He will immediately give up some meat, then get prepared for extended duty till the next holiday. But one thing that never gets wasted is the broth in the bottom of the package. It gets used almost immediately.

Salud, youall! Blessings, best wishes---go safely to and from your Holidays, and mostly, ENJOY! :smile:

Love to have you Mabelline, welcome all the time! :biggrin: That is some spread you're laying out! Pit cooked turkey and feral pig in the squash. Goodness, girl, that sounds like real home. :rolleyes: (Nudge, nudge . . . for the tamale turkey too!) Enjoy your feast. A movie or three, or a bowl game, where someone else is doing all the moving around is going to sound really good to me too about Thursday evening. :biggrin:

  Dear Lord, Judith! That buffet had better be good. Please take a picture of your rolls. I need another dose of deep intimidation. The effect of your biscuit pictures is beginning to wear off. 

I thought of a new Texas tradition that was inspired by this thread. I was discussing the situation with the nephew last night. He just got a new smoker.

To save you some time and to summarize... hollywood was asking for tips on smoking a turkey and a brisket. I have a Weber bullet and suggested that, while you would normally think about putting the turkey on the top rack and the brisket on the bottom (assuming that the turkey would come off first), why not reverse it? Put the turkey under the brisket. A smoked turkey basted in brisket fat! What could be more Texas than that? The more we thought about it the better we liked it.

Now what if we stuffed that bird with tamales? Positioned it so some of the juices would get into the cavity?

And that was such a good suggestion! OMG, fifi, now you've hit on the ultimate combination, I do believe! So you're going to do that next year? What time should we arrive? :raz::laugh:

No intimidation :wink: -- but I'll post pics of rolls. I think I need to go shape the little devils about now. Once that's done I can start on the light wheat dough for the other rolls and bread offering. Gotta make sure there's plenty of bread for those post-debauchery turkey sandwiches. :wink:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Well... The Brisket/Turkey experiment may happen before next year. Nephew took the new smoker out for a "seasoning run" last weekend and was entranced with how steady it held temperature and is anxious to try it out. I told him that the real test would be an 18 hour brisket and he agreed. When I mentioned the turkey he got all wiggly and impatient. :laugh: We will no doubt discuss at some length tomorrow. (Oddly enough, our discussions remind me of scenes from Nero Wolfe with Fritz.)

If we give it a go, I will post with pictures. Then we can work on naming it. :biggrin: Texas Turkey is just too obvious. :laugh:

Mabelline... That pit turkey is fascinating. I am looking forward to a detailed description. Pictures maybe? If you could arrange it?

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Well we ate, and then ate more. :rolleyes:

The day started with lots of coffee and assorted sweet rolls (baked while everyone else was snoozing). I just started out with my basic sweet potato dough I use for cinnamon rolls, and other sweet breads. Next thing I knew I was done with the cin rolls and into the other things. :blink:

gallery_12550_103_1101454161.jpg

We ate something of almost all of it but the big loaf, which is filled with golden raisins and pecans. That we'll cut to serve with the cheese plate and fresh fruit for lunch on Friday.

And this sweet potato boule that goes to my neighbors in the morning. :biggrin:

gallery_12550_103_1101457316.jpg

Also soft white dinner rolls and hard mixed grain dinner rolls. The loaves I did for turkey sandwiches, which we haven't gotten around to yet. However, that's sounding pretty good right now, it's been about 12 hours since we ate and I've napped twice since then. :wink:

gallery_12550_103_1101381957.jpg

Which is good because I forgot to sleep with all the baking and preparations so I napped for a couple of hours after the turkey went in this morning. :huh: When I went to sleep it looked like this, well, before the EVOO soaked cheesecloth shroud of turkin' was applied.

gallery_12550_164_1101455240.jpg

When it was done it was unshrouded -- and a deeply reddish brown glorious bird it was! And the two strips of bacon were immediately snarfed up by the two cooks in the kitchen at the time, brother and me. this was the best! Not a piece of that bird that wasn't finger sucking good! :biggrin:

Unfortunately, I wasn't thinking camera, I was thinking get this food out there to the troops who had become seven hungry souls lurking around the kitchen and ready to get past the relish tray and deviled eggs -- which they had devoured. The gorgonzola/garlic chive spread stuffed in celery was the the hit on the starters table. The experimental pork mincemeat version for the dressing is another new goodie to add to my holiday traditions list. OMG! that was so good! And I still have half a quart left for something else. :wub:

Brother made White Chocolate Pumpkin cheesecakes in 4.5" springforms -- with a sour cream/Grand Marnier baked topping. :wub: We are so happy he decided to come this year! :laugh:

Confession: I also forgot the baked sweet potato with plantains and pecans sitting in the warmer :hmmm: so we get to enjoy them tomorrow night all new! This will be an appropriately Southern/Mexican fusion meal with the turkey sour cream enchiladas my mr promises to make for dinner. :laugh:

With company here the holiday continues through the weekend.

How was the buffet, fifi? And the pit turkey, Mabelline? Did you do better than I did and actually take some shots of your bird? :rolleyes:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Pit turkey was finer than frog hair. I am ashamed to admit I am intimidated by my camera, but I will buckle down and learn to use it, I swear.

The oven bird went in with 7 tamales, and everytime I crossed the room I swiped some more...Gads, fifi, that turned out fabulous! I am now hooked.

The only weird thing about the pitbird is that it has little to no brown on it. It is totally wrapped in tinfoil, shiny side inwards. The only brown it gets is the first placement on the hot rocks or bricks and the cooking rocks piled around it. The top is hot coals, a hunk of sheet metal, and cover that back up with some of the dirt from the hole. The tricky thing is the first few layers of foil, because they are always hotter than Hades, no matter how long you left it in. We took that off outside with fullarm welders gloves so the ash and dirt stays outside. Once you get down that far, you've got to have a deep pan for it. Then, inside, I cut off the foil with kitchen shears, and drained the juice off. It is like the best broth you will ever taste!!! Worth a year's wait!!

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[Confession: I also forgot the baked sweet potato with plantains and pecans sitting in the warmer  :hmmm:  so we get to enjoy them tomorrow night all new! This will be an appropriately Southern/Mexican fusion meal with the turkey sour cream enchiladas my mr promises to make for dinner. :laugh:

That's ok. It's always fun to find something that you forgot. This year my wife made this great cranberry relish stuff that has to made ahead of time to marinate (it has orange peels (I used satsuma peels) in it and the stuff is awesome) and we completely forgot about it. No big deal. Just more for sandwich making today!

And the turkey probably looked a bit like this(although you are a much better photographer than I).

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I missed that post about that cookbook.   I've just ordered it! :biggrin:

The Cotton Country Collection is a pretty amazing book. It was put together at a time when there were still older women in the Delta who knew the older recipes that they had learned from their mothers, grandmothers, housekeepers, and cooks and the younger group of women who put it together showed a great amount of respect and care in the assembly of this masterwork. The combination of the old Delta South recipes, the food of the piney woods of South Arkansas, East Texas (see, Texas, on topic :wink: ) and North Louisiana, along with many of the things that will be familiar to lovers of South Louisiana fare are sure to be pretty enticing to anyone who takes the time to thumb through it. The dessert, cookie, cake section is full of great uses for cane sugar and mexican vanilla, and the game section is second to none (ducks in olive gravy is one of the finest uses for wild game, of any sort, ever concocted). There are vegetable recipes that I have never seen anywhere else, as well as some interesting and really delicious "throwback" recipes to a time when a can of cream of mushroom or Rotel Tomatoes were not sneered at by discerning foodies.

My mother was on the test committee and as a twelve year old I had the opportunity, nightly for about a year or so, to eat things that I love to this day and would have doubtlessly not tried for a very long time (if ever) had it not been for the publishing of this book.

There are others, of course, River Road, Southern Sideboards, etc. are all great books, but in my mind none is as all encompassing of the food of the Central Southern United States as The Cotton Country. I highly reccomend it. I have a copy that is from the first publishing that I can't open up without a page falling out (actually, now that I think about it, I could probably boil it in some broth and it would make a tasty soup, given the large amount of stuff that is stuck to it's well thumbed pages).

I particularly reccomend the Sweet Potato Casserole and the Lemon Loves, as they are credited to my mother and my grandmother. While I am certainly prone to a little bias here, this truly is a great book.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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The Houston Yacht Club buffet idea resulted in a thoroughly delightful day.

The Houston Yacht Club is on the shore of Galveston Bay sort of between LaPorte and Seabrook. It is actually in an area called Shoreacres. The club is quite likely the oldest one in Texas being founded in 1897. The elegant "clubhouse" is a pink stucco confection that probably dates to the '20s. It is built in the same style as the Royal Hawaiian in Waikiki. At least that is what it reminds me of, inside and out, with added decore of sailboat models and half hulls. The dining room is large and spacious with comfortable chairs, excellent service. The web site is here but I couldn't find a good picture of the club building and its interior.

Now to the food... This is a case of all of the traditional favorites executed very well. I am sure I will leave some things out because there was no way to try everything. There was a long table with starters: salad makings, pasta salad, smoked salmon, veggies, fruit, marinated mushrooms, brie and toast, etc. Meat was turkey, pork roast, ham and leg of lamb. Sides: green beans, asparagus, brocolli rice and cheese casserole, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, cornbread dressing, giblet gravy, and some other stuff I don't remember. Desserts: pecan pie, pumpkin pie, key lime pie, cheese cake with assorted fruit sauces, bread pudding with brandy sauce, chocolate layer cake, and... a jello mold :laugh: !

The outstanding dishes were:

Green beans: they weren't shy with the bacon and garlic, I will get more generous with garlic from now on

Cornbread dressing: the seasoning was spot on, I have to remember to bump the sage up a bit in my recipe

Giblet gravy: that was some of the best I have ever had and I am not a big fan

Leg of lamb: again the cook knows how to season

The weather was crisp and sunny so we went for a stroll around the harbor after eating the main course. Then we went back for dessert. The key lime pie was memorable.

We retired to a friend and future neighbor's long pier in San Leon and sat out over the bay. The full moon was rising on one side as the sun was going down on the other. Good conversation, good food, lovely settings in spectacular weather... It doesn't get any better than that.

Judith... I am speechless. I cannot imagine ever attempting baking like that. I am torn. The fact that a mortal human can do it should inspire me to try. The fact that your talents are so momentous flings me into deep intimidation. :laugh:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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The Houston Yacht Club buffet idea resulted in a thoroughly delightful day.

The Houston Yacht Club is on the shore of Galveston Bay sort of between LaPorte and Seabrook. It is actually in an area called Shoreacres. The club is quite likely the oldest one in Texas being founded in 1897. The elegant "clubhouse" is a pink stucco confection that probably dates to the '20s. It is built in the same style as the Royal Hawaiian in Waikiki. At least that is what it reminds me of, inside and out, with added decore of sailboat models and half hulls. The dining room is large and spacious with comfortable chairs, excellent service. The web site is here but I couldn't find a good picture of the club building and its interior.

While I have not been to the Houston Yacht club, I go to Keels and wheels every year at the Lakewood Yacht club. I can attest that their Sunday buffet is always quite good. :laugh: Almost makes me wish I had a yacht instead of cars. :raz: But not quite.

Never trust a skinny chef

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Mabelline... I am glad you liked the tamales. (Remember folks, this wasn't my idea. We got it from Jean Andrews, the pepper lady.) I am now going to go get some good tamales and a big chicken and give it a go. When you have more tamales available, line the bottom of the baking pan with them as well. I am thinking this will work with just about any roasted bird.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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[Confession: I also forgot the baked sweet potato with plantains and pecans sitting in the warmer  :hmmm:  so we get to enjoy them tomorrow night all new! This will be an appropriately Southern/Mexican fusion meal with the turkey sour cream enchiladas my mr promises to make for dinner. :laugh:

That's ok. It's always fun to find something that you forgot. This year my wife made this great cranberry relish stuff that has to made ahead of time to marinate (it has orange peels (I used satsuma peels) in it and the stuff is awesome) and we completely forgot about it. No big deal. Just more for sandwich making today!

And the turkey probably looked a bit like this(although you are a much better photographer than I).

Yes, it did! Thanks for saving my sorry butt and posting the link, Mayhaw Man. :biggrin:

We also had giblet gravy, per the recipe with the turkey, mmm-hmmmm!

Mabelline, the pit turkey sounds wonderful! (Done piggies like that (well, if you can call a 350 lb porker a piggy!) I think you'll love that cookbook too. Mine arrived in the mailbox the day before Thanksgiving, unknown to us since we hadn't realized we didn't check the mail, and into the house Thanksgiving afternoon! Mayhaw Man was kind enough to give my the recipe staight out of the book when I just knew it wouldn't arrive on time. (ETA was yesterday according to Amazon.com after I ordered it -- so it arrived sooner than expected. Must be holiday magic. :rolleyes: )

Fifi, you make me blush. :blush: Bread is fun! After all these years baking bread essentially by the whim of the moment -- and accumulated experience -- I just got the BBA by Reinhart. Fabulous book -- I would definitely recommend it. Now I know why some of things I do (I've been pre-fermenting for years!) work to make great bread! :laugh:

The yacht club party buffet sounds delicious, fifi. That's one damn good way to not cook for Thanksgiving. :raz::biggrin: Tamale little bird sounds like a winner too. Maybe more tamales in the pan since there won't be as many inside the bird. :rolleyes:

The Mexican/Southern fusion dinner last night was actually quite good -- I think the plantains carried it off. And the White Chocolate Pumpkin Cheesecake for dessert was heaven on a plate. :wub:

Gotta go do some brunch now for departing family to set them on the road. More pics later. :wink:

I'm back!

We cut the big loaf for lunch yesterday. (It was good toasted with butter for brunch of poached eggs and bacon this morning too. :rolleyes: )

gallery_12550_103_1101589929.jpg

Served it with cheese board, fruit (apples, pears and red grapes), and wine, for an antiturkey lunch on Friday.

gallery_12550_164_1101591440.jpg

edited to add images

Edited by lovebenton0 (log)

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Judith, your pictures are a peak at heaven. I will aspire to that level of picture, but my baking will need some serious practice. That's just plumb beautiful, I think! I am curious about the grapes on your cheese plate. We have gotten those up here recently, and I am just not familiar with them. I buy grapes every week, for my rabbit, primarily, but he's a good bun and he shares sometimes. ANYWAY, I am puzzled because I am getting table grapes that are 1/2 red 1/2 white on the same grape. They've got a distinct honey taste to them as well. I can't seem to get a name of variety from any produce mongers (including brother-in-law, for cryin' out loud!).

It was sheer luck with the feral pig. Two of DH's firebrothers were going to Texas a month ago, and I called a ranchman in Throckmorton I know who gladly let them come out and relieve him of three. They brought me some meat back, along with a funny tale of one of their horses going very Mustang on one ol' boy.

I am in total agreement about tamale chicken; it'd have to be great. Right now I'm graduatin' to the different types I could make for that express purpose. We are coming into tamale season---ye--double--hah!! I am ready!!!

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Tamales! Yes! I was so hungry for some I picked up a few in the local HEB deli the other day when shopping, and they were pretty good. Not like Rosies's just out the road a bit, but my ride (my sweet mr on his day off) wasn't making another stop in the suddenly pouring down rain!

I want to make some tamales this season myself -- sounds like you're already going, Mabelline! Is there a tamale thread? Certainly I would think so!

Can't take the credit for all of the pics -- some were taken by visiting brother -- with a soupy-dupier digi-cam than mine! But glad you enjoyed them anyway! :wink: I keep practicing -- mr is about resigned to me clicking before serving or eating these days. Even if I don't post most of them, the practice is good for me. Best thing about those -- you don't like it? Dump it! Not even any film to be wasting. :rolleyes::cool:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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I don't remember a tamale thread, but my neighbor and I made 21 dozen yersterday. We made 4 dozen each chicken and pepper jack, and beef, and the rest were pork. A lot of fun, but also a lot of work. The Kitchen Aid really is great for the masa. I don't think I'd attempt them without it.

Stop Family Violence

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There you go!!! It's like Boone and Crockett points for masa. I am now drooling on the board, and it's TAMALE time. I have to call my nurse buds I've done this with the last two years---I met 'em in hospital; Dana you are 100% on this---you have to have a gang of tias and amas to do tamales! The more, the better!!!

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I'm gonna have to do it without a KA as I don't have one -- unless I can talk my dear friend into us doing them at her house . . . that's a better idea! :biggrin: Get tamales and amiga time all all in one swell foop!

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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This just in . . .

I just received the Jean Andrews books that I am giving for gifts. This is the one published in 1999: The Pepper Trail, History & Recipes from Around the World. The link below benefits the eGullet Society.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/157...9/egulletcom-20

The tamale stuffed turkey is on page 144 and is titled "South Texas Turkey with Tamale Dressing".

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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