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Chocolates with that showroom finish, 2004 - 2011


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That's a real find!

It looks like they sprayed part of the molds on an angle. If the letters on the Cocoa square are raised that would explain why they didn't get covered. Either that or they had to wipe parts of it clean after spraying and that would be a little delicate of an operation.

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  • 1 month later...

I've just been reading the thread on chocolates from several years ago, being especially interested in getting a thinner shell coating of chocolate in my molds. Since I am a really real beginner at chocolate making-I bake and sell cakes-I don't even have tempering or instant-read thermometer yet. I've been experimenting, and from what I've read, the chocolate temperature for tempering seems by feel to be just barely warm. or slightly below body temperature. At any rate, when it is at this temperature-or the temp I'm guessing at- the chocolate is fairly thick, and I have been painting the chocolate shells to be filled with some filling or other with a paint brush. Of course, the shell is too thick, and I barely have enough room to fill it and then close up the bottom with the rest of the chocolate. I've seen demos on t.v. where they fill the molds with chocolate, turn them upside down to get the excess out, and then fill, etc. Thier chocolate seems to just flow out of the molds like water. I am using real couveture chocolate-Valrhona, Callebut, Lindt, etc. On the show room finish thread, Trishiad (are you there?) mentions spinning the molds upside down over a piece of parchment to spin out the excess. I am stumped, even though I haven't tried it yet. How do you actually spin it? With it in the air, or flat on the counter? How do you get enough centrifugal force to do this? Any time I've tried turning my molds upside down, the chocolate just sits there. Help a fledgling, please. Some good friends have tasted my chocolates, and as beginner as I know they really are, they would like for me to make a sampler box for their son's birthday, who is flying in from California the third week in May. My fiilings aren't half bad, it's the finish that's truly lacking (luster dust can hide a multitude of sins). Still working on tempering, and I will have a good thermometer before then. Thanks, y'all!

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I've just been reading the thread on chocolates from several years ago, being especially interested in getting a thinner shell coating of chocolate in my molds. Since I am a really real beginner at chocolate making-I bake and sell cakes-I don't even have tempering or instant-read thermometer yet.  I've been experimenting, and from what I've read,  the chocolate temperature for tempering seems by feel to be just barely warm. or slightly below body temperature.  At any rate, when it is at this temperature-or the temp I'm guessing at- the chocolate is fairly thick, and I have been painting the chocolate shells to be filled with some filling or other with a paint brush.  Of course, the shell is too thick, and I barely have enough room to fill it and then close up the bottom with the rest of the chocolate.  I've seen demos on t.v. where they fill the molds with chocolate, turn them upside down to get the excess out, and then fill, etc. Thier chocolate seems to just flow out of the molds like water.  I am using real couveture chocolate-Valrhona, Callebut, Lindt, etc.  On the show room finish thread, Trishiad (are you there?) mentions spinning the molds upside down over a piece of parchment to spin out the excess.  I am stumped, even though I haven't tried it yet.  How do you actually spin it? With it in the air, or flat on the counter?  How do you get enough centrifugal force to do this?  Any time I've tried turning my molds upside down, the chocolate just sits there. Help a fledgling, please. Some good friends have tasted my chocolates, and as beginner as I know they really are, they would like for me to make a sampler box for their son's birthday, who is flying in from California the third week in May.  My fiilings aren't half bad, it's the finish that's truly lacking (luster dust can hide a multitude of sins).  Still working on tempering, and I will have a good thermometer before then.  Thanks, y'all!

What molds are you using, the floppy plastic or the ridgid polycarbonate? With the professional poly carbonate molds you turn them upside down and then you tap on them to encourage your chocolate to come out. With the floppy molds you just flip it upside down then sort of jiggle it (or move it in circles) to encourage the chocolate to come out. Elaine Gonzales (chocartist on eG) book "The Art of Chocolate" shows this technique in picture form which is very helpful.

Not all couverture chocolate flows well at the correct working temperature, and I'm not sure how you determine the viscosity of Valhrhona or Lindt. With the Callebaut if the packaging shows three little drops (or more) on it, the viscosity will be fine for molding. You should get your working temperature up to the top end of the range - so 31 C for dark, 29 for milk, 27 for white.

You need to work fairly quickly so your chocolate doesn't cool and thicken.

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As Kerry said, it could be the type of chocolate you're using, but to me it sounds like your chocolate is just too cold. Don't delay on buying a thermometer - you can get a cheap digital instant read that will work just fine for $10 or less. It will be hard for us to diagnose the problem without more data.

What method are you using to temper?

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

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there is also a point when the shells can be too thin. if you shake/spin/vibrate out too much of the excess chocolate, beware. there won't be enough chocolate inside the shell to have enough contraction to allow the chocolates to pop out of the mold.

and it is good to have a thermometer while you're practicing and learning, but try to get used to how the chocolate looks and feels when it is in temper. if it feels warm to you (if you do the lip test) then it is too warm as our body temp is 98.6 and the max that dark chocolate should reach is around 93 degrees Fahrenheit. it should feel cool to the touch.

oh, and take a look at this demo by John DePaula...

as well as this demo by Trishiad.

these demos should be a wealth of information.

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I would just add the following: if your chocolate is too thick it's probably just too cold; however, it can also be that your working environment is too humid or you're not stirring enough.

time + temperature + movement = temper

If you have everything else correct and your chocolate is still thicker than you like, you can adjust the viscosity by adding a small amount of cocoa butter, melted but cooled to your working temperature. Actually, I like to add the cocoa butter at the start but that may take more experience to know how much, etc.

Do note what Alana and Kerry and Tammy have recommended already.

Remember: Making Chocolate Makes Fun! :biggrin:

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Hey, everyone~Just an update: First of all thanks to John Paula and Trishiad for their excellent demos. I especially appreciate the demo ,Trishiad, that you showed using the heating pad method, as I can't afford a real tempering machine yet. I did, however, purchase a Taylor digital insta-read thermometer and a 5lb. capacity Salter digital gr/oz scales. Per another thread on transfer sheets and everyone's info, I was able to get six individual transfer sheets for 3-5.00$ a piece. After reading the thread on Peter Greweling's new book, I ordered that as well. Can't wait to get started! I have a few weeks to practice my techniques before I have to deliver the goods that were ordered, so I feel that I have a little wiggle room to get more than a few things corrected. Thanks, again to all for your generosity and sympathy for a newbie chocolatier. :rolleyes:

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  • 1 month later...

I'm a newbie to Egullet.org, and I love this thread! I've done truffles and some other candies at home for years, but am really interested in taking to a small scale professional level.

Thank you all so much for sharing your tips on getting great finishes, those chocolates are gorgeous!

  • Like 1

Shai, santoku-wielding dabbler in many things culinary.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I've read through the thread and apologies if I missed it somewhere earlier, but I had a question on using luster dust.

Can I just sprinkle some dust into a mould and then paint some colour over the top? Will the dust still show through or will it get covered/moved by the painted colour?

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I've read through the thread and apologies if I missed it somewhere earlier, but I had a question on using luster dust.

Can I just sprinkle some dust into a mould and then paint some colour over the top? Will the dust still show through or will it get covered/moved by the painted colour?

Yup, luster dust can be either put on dry or mixed with cocoa butter. You get two different effects. You will get some movement of the dust if it is dry.

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Thanks Kerry. How would you describe the differences between the two effects (ie., mixed with cocoa butter and dry)?

Here earlier on this thread shows the mixed with cocoa butter effect and in post number 146 Vanessa shows dusting dry.

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Thanks for the help Kerry. My wife gave me some yellow colouring and gold dust on the weekend, so I'm very keen to give it a try this coming weekend. Could be a busy weekend if I want to try both methods of applying the dust and I've also got some truffle shells which need filling.

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Can anyone give me some guidance on the best tool to get for applying colored cocoa butter to praline molds? I have worked with a Wagner 2400 but doubt this is the thing to get the finest spray.

I've been pretty successful with hand-painting but would like to back them up with a spray of color to make the designs pop.

gallery_48203_4256_20638.jpg

I have an inexpensive top-feed airbrush used with thin airbrush colors and luster dust thinned with alcohol for cakes, but it has a tiny compressor 3" x 6" which I'm sure cannot handle cocoa butter. I guess my question is what to upgrade to.

So far browsing these boards I've seen the Badger 250, 150 and Iwatas mentioned, but what are the pros and cons (aside from dual action which I think is neccessary for going up the sides of the molds) --bottom feed external mix, top feed internal mix (like the one I have but heavy)?

Mostly for home use but occasional teaching application. I will be getting a new compressor too (not too bulky or heavy so it travels) so any recommendations for that are helpful too.

Edited by reenicake (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all,

I'm a real novice and I need some assistance with basic moulding. I read through this post and would like some clarification on some basic problems I cannot solve.

My Process:

tempering: My technique from what I understand of wybauw's seeding method, is to melt 2/3 of the chocolate (felchin dark) (45-50) celsius and then reduce the temperature by slowly adding already tempered chunks, back down to 28 degrees celsius. Once that is completed I bring the chocolate back up to 33 degrees celsius and pour into the mould.

I am using a basic square polycarbonate mould which is of very good quality.

To practice I have been tempering the chocolate, filling the mould up completely, then placing it in the fridge straight away for about an hour/hour and a half, and then demould. I have not been filling the insides, just making solid squares.

I believe that the problem emanates from the cleanliness of my mold or cooling technique.

I have had mixed reports about mold hygiene. So far I have been cleaning the mold with warm water, and sometimes placing in the dishwasher. Last time I did not, clean it, but merely cleaned the inside with cotton balls. I seem to be getting some sort of patchiness after I demold.

Am I supposed to clean my mold? If so, how? if not, what do I do about the chocolate that surrounds that other part of the mold, i.e. the residue left on the sides of the mold. Also what do I do with the actual mold cavity. I have provided two pictures. One I believe was perfect, the other present the problem at hand. Would using an air-gun solve this problem?

If there are any texts that thoroughly explore these basics, Could you please recommend them.

Thanks, in advance, Josh,

The bottom left appears to be perfect, but the third from the left along the bottom highlights my problem the best.

gallery_43290_4852_14782.jpg

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Hi all,

I'm a real novice and I need some assistance with basic moulding. I read through this post and would like some clarification on some basic problems I cannot solve.

My Process:

tempering: My technique  from what I understand of wybauw's seeding method, is to melt 2/3 of the chocolate (felchin dark) (45-50) celsius and then reduce the temperature by slowly adding already tempered chunks, back down to 28 degrees celsius. Once that is completed I bring the chocolate back up to 33 degrees celsius and pour into the mould.

I am using a basic square polycarbonate mould which is of very good quality.

To practice I have been tempering the chocolate, filling the mould up completely, then placing it in the fridge straight away for about an hour/hour and a half, and then demould. I have not been filling the insides, just making solid squares.

I believe that the problem emanates from the cleanliness of my mold or cooling technique.

I have had mixed reports about mold hygiene. So far I have been cleaning the mold with warm water, and sometimes placing in the dishwasher. Last time I did not, clean it, but merely cleaned the inside with cotton balls. I seem to be getting some sort of patchiness after I demold.

Am I supposed to clean my mold? If so, how? if not, what do I do about the chocolate that surrounds that other part of the mold, i.e. the residue left on the sides of the mold. Also what do I do with the actual mold cavity. I have provided two pictures. One I believe was perfect, the other present the problem at hand. Would using an air-gun solve this problem?

If there are any texts that thoroughly explore these basics, Could you please recommend them.

Thanks, in advance, Josh,

The bottom left appears to be perfect, but the third from the left along the bottom highlights my problem the best.

gallery_43290_4852_14782.jpg

If you are using the seed method, you don't need to bring the temperature down to 28 then back up again. You can stop once you reach the working temperature (around 32 for dark chocolate).

Re the mold, no more putting it in the dishwasher. I think your mold is just a little too clean and that might be contributing to the patchiness. The dishwasher strips off all the cocoa butter, which you want to start building up a layer of in your mold. So scoop your chocolate into the mold, bang for bubbles and scrape. Leave on the counter until you see a bit of crystallization starting to happen around the edges, then put in the fridge until hardens. Look at the bottom of the mold, looking for the change in colour that you see when the chocolate has separated from the mold. At this point you can leave them in the mold overnight before knocking out if you want. They seem to be shinier that way at times.

I then just run some hot water and run the mold under that to clean, sometimes sponging off any bits that cling.

There is a great little text, tiny thing, called the Gerard Ronay Chocolate Kit, you will likely find a copy on e-bay or abebooks. It does a better job of the theory than the really expensive books.

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Hi all,

Long time reader, one of my first times posting! Whenever I use my Badger to spray cocoa butter into the molds, they come out very marbled. Some of the color stays in the mold, and some transfers onto the choclates, so I am left wt chocolates with patche of plain chocolate and then patches of the colors. Not very attractive! I have tried increasng set time before adding the chocolate and increased time before unmolding, and yet nothing seems to be working. Any hints? The CCB I use is Chef Rubber, I have several colors, and I use the pro quality clear molds.

"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

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Hi there :smile:

I can think of few things that would have that effect on you finish product.One would be that you chocolates is too warm ,or that you enviroment is too warm /humid and the chocolate takes too long to set so goes out of temper while setting ( this was my problem when trying to work in the middle of a very hot summer ).Maybe you need to extra polish the molds (depends what mold , I have noticed that my opaque ones , rarely give me any problem , while the clear ones can be tricky sometimes if I dont polish them well ).

Good luck, let us know how its goes .

Vanessa

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