Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Skwerl

Chocolates with that showroom finish, 2004 - 2011

Recommended Posts

Well after carefully following this thread from the start I thought I should post up the outcome of my first experiment. They're a bit rough around the edges but I sure had fun with the red cocoa butter and gold dust. These were the only ones that were left by the time I remembered to take photos. I thought the red, gold and dark chocolate shells were a good match for the Chai tea infused ganache filling.

gallery_63295_6552_64471.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well after carefully following this thread from the start I thought I should post up the outcome of my first experiment.  They're a bit rough around the edges but I sure had fun with the red cocoa butter and gold dust.  These were the only ones that were left by the time I remembered to take photos.  I thought the red, gold and dark chocolate shells were a good match for the Chai tea infused ganache filling.

gallery_63295_6552_64471.jpg

Welcome vaulter1, nice to have you with us on eG.

I agree - the red, gold and dark chocolate makes a very classy presentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been trying to spray the inside of my molds to get a decent shine. I purchased a sprayer from JB Prince (as someone on here suggested). It was the Easy Spray HV2002. I mixed the chocolate & cocoa butter at several different ratios, and it didn't seem to matter. It kind of sputtered out and never really "sprayed". I tried a 70-30 ratio, a 50-50 ratio and tried using a coating. It didn't really matter.. it was pretty much just a sputter and it seemed to clog up after a few mins. I tried adjusting the spray setting on the sprayer but I am kind of lost. I have been making molded chocolates for years and this is the first time I have tried spraying.

Let me know what you guys think, I appreciate any input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have been trying to spray the inside of my molds to get a decent shine. I purchased a sprayer from JB Prince (as someone on here suggested). It was the Easy Spray HV2002. I mixed the chocolate & cocoa butter at several different ratios, and it didn't seem to matter. It kind of sputtered out and never really "sprayed". I tried a 70-30 ratio, a 50-50 ratio and tried using a coating. It didn't really matter.. it was pretty much just a sputter and it seemed to clog up after a few mins. I tried adjusting the spray setting on the sprayer but I am kind of lost.  I have been making molded chocolates for years and this is the first time I have tried spraying.

Let me know what you guys think, I appreciate any input.

What sort of pressure is the compressor putting out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have been trying to spray the inside of my molds to get a decent shine. I purchased a sprayer from JB Prince (as someone on here suggested). It was the Easy Spray HV2002. I mixed the chocolate & cocoa butter at several different ratios, and it didn't seem to matter. It kind of sputtered out and never really "sprayed". I tried a 70-30 ratio, a 50-50 ratio and tried using a coating. It didn't really matter.. it was pretty much just a sputter and it seemed to clog up after a few mins. I tried adjusting the spray setting on the sprayer but I am kind of lost.  I have been making molded chocolates for years and this is the first time I have tried spraying.

Let me know what you guys think, I appreciate any input.

What sort of pressure is the compressor putting out?

It looks like the only info I could find is 4psi. That doesn't seem like very much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have been trying to spray the inside of my molds to get a decent shine. I purchased a sprayer from JB Prince (as someone on here suggested). It was the Easy Spray HV2002. I mixed the chocolate & cocoa butter at several different ratios, and it didn't seem to matter. It kind of sputtered out and never really "sprayed". I tried a 70-30 ratio, a 50-50 ratio and tried using a coating. It didn't really matter.. it was pretty much just a sputter and it seemed to clog up after a few mins. I tried adjusting the spray setting on the sprayer but I am kind of lost.  I have been making molded chocolates for years and this is the first time I have tried spraying.

Let me know what you guys think, I appreciate any input.

What sort of pressure is the compressor putting out?

It looks like the only info I could find is 4psi. That doesn't seem like very much.

Might be why it's sputtering - when I want mine to sputter, I turn back the PSI. What sort of compressor are you using? Might be that you need a more powerful one to get the output the airbrush needs for a liquid as viscous a chocolate.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not familiar with the spray gun you are using but my gun requires 40psi at 100CFM. Your gun should come with that info. I think Kerry hit the nail on the head with her question. It sure does sound like you don't have enough pressure to atomize your mixture.

Let us know what you discover.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not familiar with the spray gun you are using but my gun requires 40psi at 100CFM.  Your gun should come with that info.  I think Kerry hit the nail on the head with her question.  It sure does sound like you don't have enough pressure to atomize your mixture.

Let us know what you discover.

Well this compressor & gun is specifically sold on JB Prince's website for spraying chocolate. I had read in this forum that other people had good luck with it. Is it possible that the mixture is just to thick or thin?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not familiar with the spray gun you are using but my gun requires 40psi at 100CFM.  Your gun should come with that info.  I think Kerry hit the nail on the head with her question.  It sure does sound like you don't have enough pressure to atomize your mixture.

Let us know what you discover.

Well this compressor & gun is specifically sold on JB Prince's website for spraying chocolate. I had read in this forum that other people had good luck with it. Is it possible that the mixture is just to thick or thin?

Looking on the Campbell Hausfeld site the operating instructions for that unit show an airflow control on the side of the gun behind the trigger and in front of the hose attachment. Try turning that one and see if you can increase the airflow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to check, are you warming the gun before using it? If it's quite cold and you try to spray the mix it could clog enough to make it splutter, but not entirely block up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure the HV2002 uses a 2 stage turbine rather than a compressor, so the low PSI shouldn't be an issue, at least not with the supplied gun. Trying to force the chocolate through a thinner nozzle than the one they supply might be another story.

I've just bought an Earlex 1900, which is a much cheaper HVLP turbine system (with an even lower PSI), and had great success getting a fine, even spray - with 200g dark choc to 100g of cocoa butter - onto a cake at the weekend.

Haven't had a chance to try it on chocolate moulds yet, but based on test sprays onto card imagine it will work well. The only thing I'm not sure about is if the fact it has a bleeder mechanism (ie air flowing at all times) will mean there's enough pressure/flow control for splatter effects...

As HQ says it is advisable to warm the gun up to ensure there's no seizing once the liquid chocolate gets drawn up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anyone got a link to these compressors and guns?

Doesn't the compressor inevitably spray some oil into the chocolate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't the compressor inevitably spray some oil into the chocolate?

Apparently so - that's why it's important to get an oilless compressor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gallery_29688_3266_480218.jpg

white chocolate passion mint & mushroom caramel

gallery_29688_3266_1714620.jpg

gallery_29688_3266_1097895.jpg

milk chocolate whiskey & pb&j

gallery_29688_3266_421244.jpg

salt & pepper.  lemon myrtle

gallery_29688_3266_1459534.jpg

the restaurant has converted one of the rooms (the bathroom) on the second floor where a apartment used to be into a temperature controlled workspace.  The matfer r15  chocolate machine.

gallery_29688_3266_1357213.jpg

perhaps I should have cleaned up a bit before taking pics...think "lived in look" in the literal sense.

Very nice!

Am I seeing a double burner induction hob there?

Tell me more about mushroom caramel.

I have a Cook Tek induction hob. I feel it is absolutely the best available. Their service and knowlegable technicians are second to none. It is very useful for confections as it will maintain absolutely even temperatures. It is designed to work in high temperature, high humidity environments. I couldn't live without it.

Hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've never posted on this thread, though i read it all the time! just made some chocolates this week, and actually tried out lebowitz banana recipe (where i will also post these photos for those of us who are comparing banana ganaches) but just wanted to "feel cool" and be a contributor since i love to stalk this thread all the time!! :raz::P

enjoy the eye candy and have a great weekend and happy 4th! :biggrin:

gallery_60295_6566_67184.jpg

gallery_60295_6566_99378.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Norman Love does some exquisitely beautiful chocolates that are glossier than a new Ferarri.  Mine have the finish of a 1995 Mustang that hasn't been waxed-  Not bad, but nothing like Norman's.  A lot like a plain old Godiva, in fact.  How can I achieve that beautiful luster?  On a separate note, what dyes do you recommend using in cocoa butter?  The stuff I have (powdered, from Chocovision) doesn't dissolve well in cocoa butter, the colors are drab, and the results are less than wonderful.  Thanks for the suggestions, guys and gals.  :smile:

Norman Love Confections

I've had good luck with commercially prepared colored cocoa butters from both Tomric (New World Chocolate) and Chef Rubber. They have a wide variety of colors including "jewel" and "shimmer" (includes luster dust).

One particular technique which can really give you phenomenal shine is to spray a layer of thinned chocolate behind your color layer. If you are going to mold dark chocolate, create a mix of about 50% the same chocolate with 50% cocoa butter and spray it in mold before molding your shells. The way I understand it, the air brushing technique causes the mixture to crystallize very quickly which results in that beautiful shine. The back layer also gives your color great "depth".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used the Chef Rubber red colour and I overheated the bottle. When I over heat the cocoa butter I can usually retemper the mixture by running it under cold water and then the airbrushing/compressor can finish the tempering job. This time, my cocoa butter would not set. After several hours the bottle is still liquid. I am going to have to table slab temper the whole content of the bottle. Has anyone ever experienced this? The PCB brand has never done this. I have done a lot of airbrushing and this is the first time this has happened. The remedy will be to hand temper the whole bottle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I used the Chef Rubber red colour and I overheated the bottle. When I over heat the  cocoa butter I can usually retemper the mixture by running it under cold water and then the airbrushing/compressor can finish the tempering job.  This time, my cocoa butter would not set.  After several hours the bottle is still liquid.  I am going to have to table slab temper the whole content of the bottle.  Has anyone ever experienced this?  The PCB brand has never done this. I have done a lot of airbrushing and this is the first time this has happened. The remedy will be to hand temper the whole bottle.

I've had some I warmed too much and had to wait a long time for it to harden again, and it usually drops all the colour to the bottom when that happens. You might find that if you just give it a shake every 15 minutes or so until it starts to firm up, that you can avoid having to retemper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I now received mycompressor-just a cheapy 35$ ordered from badger but not a badger. So I want to try airbrushing this week. I am feeling hesitant. I went overall the threads Icould find and came up with this:

1. Some people spray plain cacao butter first - Does this not leave a cloudy layer? Does it make a difference of any sort?

2. Either first or after cb layer, spray one color and let set well

3. Spray a second color? Or should some in between layer be used?

4. When and how should I use the silver interference layer?

5. Spray a white layer if I will use dark chocolate?

6. Use dark chocolate for shells.

I tried to search for all answers and got muddled.

Anyone care to list their steps?

Pastry girl: when you did your green marbles, you wrote, swipe with green (I also want to do this method) and then white chocolate swipe. Is this white chocolate or white cb? I passed this picture onto ourforum here and everyone was shocked and has never seen anything like it. Well this technique is not known here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry this came twice!I now received mycompressor-just a cheapy 35$ ordered from badger but not a badger. So I want to try airbrushing this week. I am feeling hesitant. I went overall the threads Icould find and came up with this:

1. Some people spray plain cacao butter first - Does this not leave a cloudy layer? Does it make a difference of any sort?

2. Either first or after cb layer, spray one color and let set well

3. Spray a second color? Or should some in between layer be used?

4. When and how should I use the silver interference layer?

5. Spray a white layer if I will use dark chocolate?

6. Use dark chocolate for shells.

I tried to search for all answers and got muddled.

Anyone care to list their steps?

Pastry girl: when you did your green marbles, you wrote, swipe with green (I also want to do this method) and then white chocolate swipe. Is this white chocolate or white cb? I passed this picture onto our forum here and everyone was shocked and has never seen anything like it. Well this technique is not known here.

Thanks


Edited by Lior (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pastry girl: when you did your green marbles, you wrote, swipe with green (I also want to do this method) and then white chocolate swipe. Is this white chocolate or white cb? I passed this picture onto our forum here and everyone was shocked and has never seen anything like it. Well this technique is not known here.

Thanks

It was green cocoa butter then white chocolate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sorry this came twice!I now received mycompressor-just a cheapy 35$ ordered from badger but not a badger. So I want to try airbrushing this week. I am feeling hesitant. I went overall the threads Icould find and came up with this:

1. Some people spray plain cacao butter first - Does this not leave a cloudy layer? Does it make a difference of any sort?

2. Either first or after cb layer, spray one color and let set well

3. Spray a second color? Or should some in between layer be used?

4. When and how should I use the silver interference layer?

5. Spray a white layer if I will use dark chocolate?

6. Use dark chocolate for shells.

I tried to search for all answers and got muddled.

Anyone care to list their steps?

Pastry girl: when you did your green marbles, you wrote, swipe with green (I also want to do this method) and then white chocolate swipe. Is this white chocolate or white cb? I passed this picture onto our forum here and everyone was shocked and has never seen anything like it. Well this technique is not known here.

Thanks

1: If you want to spray 'neutral' cocoa butter first you should make sure it's a nice thin layer. An airbrush should be good for that though (as opposed to a paint sprayer).

2: You can overlap coloured cocoa butter/chocolate sprays. Try not to go overboard though because the layers of fat aren't pleasant to eat. Two to three layers isn't excessive though.

3: You can use the metallic powders before the first coat (for a prominent metallic look) or between coats. Keep in mind if it's between, say, coats 2 and 3 you won't much of what you put in (though the effect would be good).

4: Before adding a metallic powder, let the cocoa butter layer set until it's at least dry to the touch, if not the powder will cling to the unset layer and give a blotchy effect. To add the metallic I use a brush to pick up the powder then tap it into the mould, to save on powder you can place the next mould on top, flip the two moulds and bang out the excess straight into the mould. (yes that could probably be explained clearer... :hmmm: )

5: If you back a white spray with dark, you'll get grey. Visually it's pleasant, but not necessarily appetising.

6: You don't have to mould in dark chocolate. Milk or white works too. Or, if you wanted a colourful dark chocolate you could even spray the coloured cocoa butter, brush the inside with white chocolate and then mould with dark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you pastry girl! And HQAntithesis!

Is interference color metallic color?

So for a dark chocolate I should first have a white choc layer as pastry girl did.

Thank you so much! :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I now received mycompressor-just a cheapy 35$ ordered from badger but not a badger. So I want to try airbrushing this week. I am feeling hesitant. I went overall the threads Icould find and came up with this:

1. Some people spray plain cacao butter first - Does this not leave a cloudy layer? Does it make a difference of any sort?

I never spray plain first, but if it's sprayed, rather than painted on - it shouldn't be cloudy (I know this from trying to paint a bunny mold with cocoa butter - that's cloudy)

2. Either first or after cb layer, spray one color and let set well

I just spray or splatter my first colour - at this point you can use a q-tip or other tool to remove some colour while still wet. If you spray the second layer while the first layer is still wet - you get a different effect - not necessarily a bad thing. You can also spray with just air - that spreads out any splatters and gives a different effect.

3. Spray a second color? Or should some in between layer be used?

No in between layer needed.

4. When and how should I use the silver interference layer?

I use the interference powders dry on the surface of unmolded chocolates.  If I wanted to put in the molds first - I'd mix with vodka and air brush in.

5. Spray a white layer if I will use dark chocolate?

White helps the colours show up - but is not always necessary - experiment with and without to see the effect.

6. Use dark chocolate for shells.

Optional, you can use dark, milk or white.

I tried to search for all answers and got muddled.

Anyone care to list their steps?

Pastry girl: when you did your green marbles, you wrote, swipe with green (I also want to do this method) and then white chocolate swipe. Is this white chocolate or white cb? I passed this picture onto ourforum here and everyone was shocked and has never seen anything like it. Well this technique is not known here.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Chocolate cake with plums
       
      The first cake I ever dared to bake by myself was a chocolate cake. I have since baked it many times, always using the same recipe, and many times I have spoiled it at the beginning of preparation. It is necessary to cool down the chocolate mixture before adding the rest of the ingredients. On a hot summer day this process is very long, so I accelerated it by putting the pot with the mixture into some cold water in the kitchen sink. Many times, by mistake, I turned on the tap and poured water onto the cooling mixture. In hindsight these situations were amusing, but at the time it wasn't funny.

      This chocolate cake is excellent without any additives. You can enrich it with your favourite nuts or butter icing. Today I added some plums to the top of the cake. It was great and its sweet chocolate-plum aroma lingered long in my home.

      Ingredients (25cm cake tin):
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 tablespoons of cocoa
      120g of brown sugar
      15ml of almond milk
      100g of dark chocolate
      1 egg
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      plums

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Smooth the cake tin with the butter and sprinkle with dark cocoa.
      Put the butter, milk, sugar, cocoa and chocolate into the pan. Heat it until the chocolate is melted and all the ingredients have blended together well. Leave the mixture to cool down. Add the egg, flour and baking soda and mix them in. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the plums, cut them in half and remove the stones. Arrange the plum halves skin side down on top of the cake. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kerry Beal
      It's that time again - I'm the group leader for a group of newly minted Ecole Chocolat grads taking a masters course. This one is in Wieze, Belgium. You may recall my last trip as group leader for Ecole when I took a group to Valrhona in France.
       
      I got my packing done on Sunday - was all prepared, car was to pick me up at 6 pm to drive me to the airport. Got a little suspicious when the child was late getting off the bus from school - the driver said that the highway wasn't moving well. At about 5:15 I got a call from the limo service to say that the car that was coming to get me had moved 2 car lengths in the last 30 minutes. Apparently a car roll over on the westbound lanes of highway had ejected two people into the eastbound lanes and the entire highway was closed in both directions.
       
      So I set out in my own vehicle - which of course had no gas, and needed oil... at least the toll highway got me past the problem.  Airport wants $175/week to park - so a quick text to @Alleguede and he came to fetch my car from the airport to park in his driveway until I return.
       
      So here I sit in the lounge awaiting my departure.
       
      I'm doing the Jet Lag program that I have done several times before that has worked well for me. Overcoming Jet Lag, by Charles F. Ehret and Lynne Waller Scanlon. This involves food and caffeine modification. So for the past 4 days I've been drinking Rooibos Provence throughout the day and between 3 and 4:30 slugging down as much real tea as my bladder can handle! The dietary part consists of alternating days of 'feasting' and 'fasting' with high protein breakfasts and lunches and high carb dinners. I had planned to get the driver to stop at the Tim Horton's at the top of my street to pick up the black coffee that is to be taken at around 6 pm the day of travel - unfortunately as I was driving myself that didn't happen - so when I hit the lounge I drank down two cups of strong black caffeinated coffee - better late than never. I'm not much of a coffee drinker - and particularly not black. Should be good for some palpitations when I start the next part of the program which is to sleep as soon as I get on the plane!
       
      This is a 'fasting day', 800 calories suggested - I left my carb meal until I reached the lounge.
       

       
      ]
       
      One of the two cups of coffee.
       

       
      These are the "Gentlemen Retire to the Library' chocolates that I posted before that I am taking along - port wine PDF and tobacco ganache. I used Sosa tobacco flavouring this time instead of a cigar so I don't have to concern myself with nicotine poisoning.
       
       
       
       
    • By pastrygirl
      I'm watching The Sweet Makers on BBC - four British pastry chefs & confectioners recreate Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian sweets with petiod ingredients and equipment. A little British Baking Show, a little Downtown Abbey. 
       
      Check it it out for a slice of pastry history. 
       
      BBC viewer only available to the U.K., but on this side of the pond where there's a will, there's a way. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×