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Skwerl

Chocolates with that showroom finish, 2004 - 2011

587 posts in this topic

And note that the propellant used in canned air isn't generally considered food safe. So you may want to invest in a compressor if you're going to do a lot of this kind of decorating. You can get some great deals on used compressors on Ebay, and there's a thread around here somewhere that talks about what kind of compressors are good.

Do you know of a source of information as to the safety of the propellants in canned air relative to food? I have done extensive searches and the only hazard that I can find associated with either of the propellants in canned air is inhalation and as a fire hazard. Everything that I have seen says that contact with food is generally recognized as safe. On the other hand, I have heard other people say that the propellant in canned air isn't considered food safe. It's probably not good for the operator to use it a lot, but I can't find any negative reports on contact with food. I'm confused (and rambling). Probably my science background getting the better of me.

I'm looking for a compressor anyway, just to get away from the annoyances of using canned air and it gets expensive after a while.

Ok, here you go. Only "partial" info but we've posted about this before. Special Thanks to Lior, who actually contacted Badger for info.

Short answer: the propellant cans are not food safe.

Airbrush for Chocolate - post about Badger propellant food safety

I looked at the previous posts relating to canned air and emailed Badger to see what they have to say. I just want to know what in the propellant is not "food safe". Like I said before, the science background is catching up with me and I get obsessive about these things. From what I can find out, the tests have probably not been done (or published) to evaluate our use of the propellants, so it's probably best not to use them. Inhalation is definitely a bad idea, though and enough reason to switch to a compressor.

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I looked at the previous posts relating to canned air and emailed Badger to see what they have to say.  I just want to know what in the propellant is not "food safe".  Like I said before, the science background is catching up with me and I get obsessive about these things.  From what I can find out, the tests have probably not been done (or published) to evaluate our use of the propellants, so it's probably best not to use them.  Inhalation is definitely a bad idea, though and enough reason to switch to a compressor.

The other issue that we have raised before and must be considered is the safety of aerosolized coloured cocoa butter. Given the amount of aerosol produced by the little Badger - a particle mask would be an excellent idea.

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I looked at the previous posts relating to canned air and emailed Badger to see what they have to say.   I just want to know what in the propellant is not "food safe".  Like I said before, the science background is catching up with me and I get obsessive about these things.  From what I can find out, the tests have probably not been done (or published) to evaluate our use of the propellants, so it's probably best not to use them.  Inhalation is definitely a bad idea, though and enough reason to switch to a compressor.

The other issue that we have raised before and must be considered is the safety of aerosolized coloured cocoa butter. Given the amount of aerosol produced by the little Badger - a particle mask would be an excellent idea.

Agreed. When I started blowing my nose in technicolor, I figured out that I probably didn't want to be breathing this stuff in! :biggrin: Also coats my glasses, which i'll often not notice until the next morning, when I'm wondering why everything's so blurry...


Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Haha! Technicolor! LOL, I need to use my mask as well, I bougth it used once and keep spraying all that cocoa butter in my nose, sometimes the spray goes directly inside my nose from the mold!


Vanessa

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I'm doing some chocolates for a fundraiser and want to provide some nice packaging, does anyone have suggestions for a good place to order packaging?  I have seen the simple truffle boxes but I'm looking for some more elaborate 1, 1.5 and 2 lb boxes.  Thanks for any help! :biggrin:

Try Package Nakazawa. Japanese company with a sales office in LA.

Several high-end hotels I know of were looking to use them for their packaging. Comparatively inexpensive, too.

:Clay

hi clay...um, how did you read the site? isn't it all "foreign" to you?! :wacko: you can message me if you'd like or if you have an american site/contact for this company! thank you! :biggrin:

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a few "just the shell" studies i did lately...

gallery_11197_6473_87492.jpg

striped dhemispheres, maybe for a mango bonbon...

gallery_11197_6473_65241.jpg

airbrush and poured white chocolate mixed will be an absinth bonbon

gallery_11197_6473_89206.jpg

pink hemispheres with white spots (used a dishwashing brush for even sprinkles)

gallery_11197_6473_24167.jpg

and a kind of "palet d´or" the point was to try to manage the gold into the molds :-)

cheers

t.


toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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Wow! Spectacular!

Did you pipe the stripes in?

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Wow, schneich, those are all beautiful!


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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a few "just the shell" studies i did lately...

cheers

t.

great work! Are the cylinder molds as deep as they appear?


Edited by ejw50 (log)

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The palet d'or look cool!...

..did you have a problem releasing them from the mold with the gold leaf on or would you recommend to stick the goldleaf onto the finished product?

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Has anyone used any of the Interference Colors that Tomric has for sale?

Tomric Website

They really look fascinating

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The palet d'or look cool!...

..did you have a problem releasing them from the mold with the gold leaf on or would you recommend to stick the goldleaf onto the finished product?

Your chocolates are absolutely beautiful!

Ditto the above questions for me... and to add my own... was it difficult to GET the gold leaf into the mold? Care to describe your technique?

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actually unmolding was no problem, and yes those cylinders are as deep as they look. i found them on a trip to jkv, they are also featured in the ramon morato "chocolate" book (the green one). the metallic colors can be bought much cheaper than tomric, the stuff is called "candurin" its from merck, and they sell it for 90€ per kilo :-) to control the leaf gold you really need to buy a full gilder toolset: a pillow, a knife, and a brush, with that (and only with that) you will be able to control you goldleaf and even cut it in little squares...

cheers

t.


toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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This might be a similar cylinder mold at Kerekes.

yes, I think that's it.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I'm having trouble with some transfer sheets I picked up recently. They are not transfering to the chocolate completely and leaving splotchy, ot so impressive designs. Is my chocolate too cold? Am I taking them off too soon? How long do they need to sit on the set chocolate before taking them off? Could the sheets have been compromised? I bought them in Oz and they had a long trip back here, but I don't think they go overheated, the designs still look good on the sheet. Help!

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Wow!  Spectacular!

Did you pipe the stripes in?

yes, with a paper cornet

And was that white chocolate mixed with colored cocoa butter, or straight colored cocoa butter?

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I'm having trouble with some transfer sheets I picked up recently.  They are not transfering to the chocolate completely and leaving splotchy, ot so impressive designs.  Is my chocolate too cold?  Am I taking them off too soon?  How long do they need to sit on the set chocolate before taking them off?  Could the sheets have been compromised?  I bought them in Oz and they had a long trip back here, but I don't think they go overheated, the designs still look good on the sheet.  Help!

You want a good firm contraction of your chocolate to make the transfer stick. So it needs to start in a good temper and then cool correctly to get best contraction. Sometimes putting it in the fridge can help with that contraction. If the room temperature is suitable, leaving the transfer sheets overnight will give a good contraction.

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I'm having trouble with some transfer sheets I picked up recently.  They are not transfering to the chocolate completely and leaving splotchy, ot so impressive designs.  Is my chocolate too cold?  Am I taking them off too soon?  How long do they need to sit on the set chocolate before taking them off?  Could the sheets have been compromised?  I bought them in Oz and they had a long trip back here, but I don't think they go overheated, the designs still look good on the sheet.  Help!

You want a good firm contraction of your chocolate to make the transfer stick. So it needs to start in a good temper and then cool correctly to get best contraction. Sometimes putting it in the fridge can help with that contraction. If the room temperature is suitable, leaving the transfer sheets overnight will give a good contraction.

in my experience, my chocolate was too cool when i was working with the transfers and this happened. if you look further up in this thread, i'm pretty sure i posted photos of the problem. after contacting pcb, they responded that temperature was probably the issue. so, work at the upper temperature range for your chocolate (of course, still in temper). they shouldn't need to sit too long on the chocolate, but you'll get best shine and transfer if it sits for at least a couple of hours.

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I'm having trouble with some transfer sheets I picked up recently.  They are not transfering to the chocolate completely and leaving splotchy, ot so impressive designs.  Is my chocolate too cold?  Am I taking them off too soon?  How long do they need to sit on the set chocolate before taking them off?  Could the sheets have been compromised?  I bought them in Oz and they had a long trip back here, but I don't think they go overheated, the designs still look good on the sheet.  Help!

You want a good firm contraction of your chocolate to make the transfer stick. So it needs to start in a good temper and then cool correctly to get best contraction. Sometimes putting it in the fridge can help with that contraction. If the room temperature is suitable, leaving the transfer sheets overnight will give a good contraction.

in my experience, my chocolate was too cool when i was working with the transfers and this happened. if you look further up in this thread, i'm pretty sure i posted photos of the problem. after contacting pcb, they responded that temperature was probably the issue. so, work at the upper temperature range for your chocolate (of course, still in temper). they shouldn't need to sit too long on the chocolate, but you'll get best shine and transfer if it sits for at least a couple of hours.

Thanks! I figured that was it. I'll keep working on it. On the other hand, my apricot & white chocolate geodesic domes colored with orange cocoa butter turned out great and soooo shiny, too bad I then dropped my camera and broke it :rolleyes:

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Has anyone used any of the Interference Colors that Tomric has for sale?

Tomric Website

They really look fascinating

I just ordered some of the silver - I'll report back once I've had a chance to play with it. Looks fun, though.


Patty

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