Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Tea Sandwiches


Cucina
 Share

Recommended Posts

My grandfather would make a sandwich spread with bologna, mayonnaise, and sweet pickles; and a few other ingredients.

Yes, but did he cut off the crusts and cut them into dainty pieces or shapes? :biggrin:

Yes, he did. He made them, and other tea sandwiches for my grandmother's church meetings.

Bless his heart! I hope he passed on the helpful gene to other males in the family! :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nigella does tea today. Only one sandwich -- salmon poached with star anise, then mixed with mayo, ground ginger, and lettuce. Plus two tea-cake recipes.

I got to taste Benedictine (the spread, that is) last week at the preview of the "new" Museum of Modern Art. At least, now I know that's what it was. Other lovely little sandwiches included sliced cucumber, curried chicken salad, watercress, and turkey with the tiniest touch of cranberry sauce. And they all had the proper interior layer of butter, so there were no curling, dry edges. That is so important for tea sandwiches, I believe: that layer of butter before any other filling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 3 months later...

I tried making tea sandwiches once. It did not work out well as the bread got soggy and I could never figure out what to do w/ the lemon wedge.

wait for it........wait for it.......where is that rim shot?

truth be told we had tea sandwiches on a restaurant reception menu for about three months and had to remove them b/c there were mostly men in the kitchen and they could not grasp the idea of tea sandwiches. I would get these things stacked about an inch and a half high and filled w/ every thing short of the kitchen sink. As sexist as it sounds occasionally we could find a female who would do a beautiful job w/ them but I was never certain who would make the things or how they would turn out for the parties. Finally I caved and just changed the menu to read, "assortment of open faced mini sandwiches" & let the kitchen play.

in loving memory of Mr. Squirt (1998-2004)--

the best cat ever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have made many and even know how to braid the smoked salmon for that sandwich. Butter first and if you can get unsliced pullmans. presliced white bread is the pits and it is sliced too thick. I think baby arugula and cuke is my favorite. And I only use half the whites to make the egg salad, I like a yolkier filling. Beef and pork taste better on darker breads. And if the occasion is really special, I use caviar as a topping on some of them with a little cream fraiche, onion and capers. I try to balance half open faced and half with top crusts.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

My absolute favorite is butter, thinly sliced radishes, coarse salt and pepper. Technically I prefer them on a nice sourdough, but they are still good on dainty white bread. Delicious!

-Becca

www.porterhouse.typepad.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My grandfather would make a sandwich spread with bologna, mayonnaise, and sweet pickles; and a few other ingredients.

My Grandma made this, I loved it as a kid, only she used salad dressing instead of mayonaisse and a little grated onion. Although she was from Michigan, a lot of her cooking was Southern, as her mother was orphaned at about age 8, crossed Lake Superior alone on a steamer to live with her much older (and wealthy) sister in Alpena, MI, where Aunt Liz nor her girls did not cook. When my Great-Grandma married, it was to a train conductor as he was being transferred to No. Alabama, where she learned to cook from a neighbor lady. Burgoo, I still make her fruitcake, some of the best fried chicken.

I've also seen this as a small town funeral food in central Michigan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...