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"Chocolate Desserts" by Pierre Herme (Part 1)


SethG
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I have not made the raspberry tart on page 97 of the Chocolate book but I have made the ganache separately and find it quite nice. It's rich and molten when barely baked and when chilled it's very creamy and truffle like. I almost like it better cold since it's so smooth. This ganache is the same recipe used in the Desserts book (don't have the book in front of me) for the molten cake with an avocado and something sauce with bananas and for a chocolate banana tart made much like the raspberry one. I made it with the habanero chile slice but really if you are going to give it a chile hit it needs to be more like the whole thing, unless my chiles were just not hot enough. I love that heat coming through the chocolate with the caramelized bananas...

Josette

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Wm Sonoma has Valrhona cocoa  for TWENTY $IX DOLLARS

:huh::shock::sad:

Wow. I knew I got a good deal last week at the Made In France warehouse sale ($6.39 for that package), but I didn't know how good! :wacko:

Makes the fact that I bought three seem worth it! :laugh:

Gee, I wish I could play along, but school takes up most of my free baking time these days. I did have such fun with the BWJ thread, even if I did join near the end.

"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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Twenty-six dollars was the quote over the phone - freaking maniacs - and they are decidedly outside the 10 minute driving radius also - two strikes against 'em - like they needed another one after that price? ! So I'll just sit tight till Chocosphere delivers. (yah, $6.39 was a steal!!)

But but but y'know what - He baked his in a straight sided pan too - hmmm - I really want that cathedral domed look - but but but - I bet he's got more batter to pan ratio than this recipe. Hmmm, yah this picture is not from a loaf made from these proportions of ingredients or it's a bit different size pan. More like three inches wide & five inches deep, huh.

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Okay, so I've been charged with bread/dessert duty for Thanksgiving, and I feel like I need to do some traditional items. So I'm making a pumpkin pie and an apple pie. And I think I'm going to make Steve Sullivan's pumpkin/cranberry/walnut bread, which is in Baking With Julia.

Having got that stuff out of the way, I'll make Pierre Herme's Hazelnut Chocolate Sables (p. 69). And I hope to post a pic. Anyone else want to make them? They may not be a traditional Thanksgiving item, but the chocolate part and the sweet dough can be made days ahead, so they might be a good choice for the holiday.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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I picked up some Valrohna at Whole Foods, but it is not any of the types called for in the Herme book. It is labeled Valrhona Caraque 56%, which is a much lower % than most used in the book.

Is this good for anything in the book? If not what can I use it for?

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hello, i'd love to participate in this project!! i won't be able to make anything for a little bit.. b/c i have some other things already planned out. but i love this book and actually just got it so i haven't really been able to make much out of it yet. i've only made his brownies and they are really good!! i really enjoy reading this thread :biggrin:

follow my food adventures as

the sweet gourmand

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I'm still cranking out some pies, but here's my Herme cookies:

gallery_6941_401_1101364410.jpg

These cookies are great. Sorry for the blurry pic. More later.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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Looking good, SethG! Those sables look a little more moist than the ones pictured in Herme/Greenspan.

So are they good enough that you'll make them again?

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I think I will make them again. I prefer cookies like this-- made into a slab and sliced into pieces for baking. I get really bored with cookies that require a lot of individual shaping or fussing.

The sweet tart dough that sandwiches the chocolate, by the way, is incredibly good. I had a bunch of raw scraps left over (because I rolled the pieces out a little too thin) and man, were they delicious.

The cookies look as if they might have the texture of a brownie, but they're actually firm and crispy.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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I think I will make them again.  I prefer cookies like this-- made into a slab and sliced into pieces for baking.  I get really bored with cookies that require a lot of individual shaping or fussing.

The sweet tart dough that sandwiches the chocolate, by the way, is incredibly good.  I had a bunch of raw scraps left over (because I rolled the pieces out a little too thin) and man, were they delicious. 

The cookies look as if they might have the texture of a brownie, but they're actually firm and crispy.

Seth the sables look great.

I'll be giving them a go over the week end. Any particular steps where special care should be observed?

I love the tart dough too. Used it before to make the Nutella and raspberry tart with great results. I liked it so much I'm now using it for all the sweet tarts I bake.

Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.
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I love the tart dough too. Used it before to make the Nutella and raspberry tart with great results. I liked it so much I'm now using it for all the sweet tarts I bake.

I think I'll be using it for everything too. As a by-product of the cookies I have two disks of the sweet tart dough in the freezer.

I thought everything went pretty smoothly-- I think the only caution I'd offer is to avoid rolling out the tart dough too far. It is very easy to roll. I got carried away and mine was a rolled out a little too thin.

Also, I used the alternate method for peeling hazelnuts (blanching them in boiling water with baking soda), and I thought it worked very well.

Last thing: the recipe says you'll get about 150 cookies, but I was unable to cut the dough thin enough to get that many. I got something like 110. I don't think my cookies suffered for it. And they were done within the specified period of time despite their (rather slight) overthickness. The longer you refrigerate the block, the easier it will be to cut the dough as you please. I was a little pressed for time, and my first wave of cookies was cut about three hours after the block of dough went into the fridge. The second batch was at about four hours, and it was easier to cut.

Edit: By the way, today I stopped into one of my favorite places, New York Cake & Baking Distibutors (on West 22nd between 5th & 6th), and I bought myself a savarin mold. So I'm good to go for the Cinnamon Savarin Au Rhum (p.26) at some point in the future. I also looked for 7 1/2 by 3 1/2 inch loaf pans (for the Faubourg Pave (p. 17)), but I don't think such pans are easily found in the United States (I've looked around and haven't seen any). If I ever make the Pave, I think I'll just use eight by four pans. Don't you think Dorie ought to have adapted that one to a more commonly-used size?

Edited by SethG (log)

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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I've found lepicerie.com to be an excellent, competitively priced internet source for chocolate, especially Valhrona. It's sold in managable sizes as well - hope you've had success with P. Herme so far - I believe Santa is delievering my copy of the book

The book lists the percentages of all the recommended Valrhonas on p. 268.  I think I'm unlikely to use Valrhona much because it's so dear-- at least in the one shop where I've seen it sold in NYC.  I might look into internet ordering for future baking, though. 

Don't go with Baker's-- if a dessert is really a showcase for chocolate then Baker's really isn't good enough.  Many of the premium brands list percentages now, so you can sub any brand for Valrhona using percentage as a guide.

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I also looked for 7 1/2 by 3 1/2 inch loaf pans (for the Faubourg Pave (p. 17)), but I don't think such pans are easily found in the United States (I've looked around and haven't seen any). 

Well perhaps, but apparently I actually have one of the rare 7 1/2 by 3 1/2 loaf pans and the ginger apricot batter did not fit in this size pan hahahahyahnotfunny. I didn't realize I didn't have the requisite size.

But I put it in a small bundt pan and all was well. It did not crack as splendiforously as the picture but I baked it at 335 because of the bundt issue and because I did not want dry. I probably should have started at 350 and lowered after a while - but anyway.

It came out good. I cut the ginger in smaller pieces due to the never dying horrors of being served the green & red & yellow big bulbous candied chunks of matter (matter that cannot be created or destroyed I might add) found in average fruit cakes. I wanted a more uniform taste too 'cause I've never eaten ginger like that either. It's good though.

My husband really likes it. We ate it a little warm so I'm looking forward to having it again after it all mellows out. But it is nice & moist.

I also had to pulse it in the food processor to sandy up the almond & sugar.

And for the $64,000 question - yes I would make it again - husband agrees - and I want to drizzle it with a confectioner sugar/water glaze.

(Sorry no pictures - I'm currently (and usually) camera-impaired)

Soon as husband goes to work, I might have to do a scientific taste test in the purest culinary sense :laugh:

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I also looked for 7 1/2 by 3 1/2 inch loaf pans (for the Faubourg Pave (p. 17)), but I don't think such pans are easily found in the United States (I've looked around and haven't seen any). 

Well perhaps, but apparently I actually have one of the rare 7 1/2 by 3 1/2 loaf pans and the ginger apricot batter did not fit in this size pan hahahahyahnotfunny. I didn't realize I didn't have the requisite size.

I just did a search and it looks like 7.5x3.5 pans can be easily mail-ordered. I just haven't seen any in the shops. Looks like you're all set for the Pave! Sorry you had that problem with the apricot/ginger cake.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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I wont get my hands on P Herme's book until after Saint Nick makes a delivery but I am stocking up on Valhrona Chocolate from Lepicerie.com in anticipation of trying as many desserts as possible - the feedback is great from those who have tried a few reciepies already - now I will know where to start. They seem to carry every percentage of cocoa in a variety of sizes, not to mention many other pastry ingredients I have had trouble getting ahold of. check out Lepicerie.com

:wink:

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I really like that Lepicerie.com site, nice selection of stuff there.

I made 'Suzys cake' last Sunday.

Very VERY good!!!

Solid recipe, can't wait to get the book.

Oh, BTW, good idea to stock up on the Valrhona, prices are bound to go up even more with the turmoil in the Ivory Coast region.

2317/5000

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I'm kinda busy, but I'd like to make something this weekend, and I have Herme's sweet tart dough burning a hole in my freezer... if that's possible.

Anyone wanna make the Nutella tart (p. 119)? It looks really simple, but it does involve ganache, so a bit more technique is required than was needed for the apricot/ginger cake.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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I'll finally be getting around to the Chocolate Hazelnut Sables this weekend or early next week. I'm participating in a cookie exchange this year and will be including that in my packages. I'm stoked after seeing your pictures.

I had some extra yolks hanging around, so I made the Breton Sand Cookies from the Desserts book...good eatin'!

Aw, heck...maybe I'll try to crank out the nutella tart too. No promises, but I have a bunch of chocolate that has been around a little too long for my tastes.

(thanks again for this thread...you rock!)

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I'll finally be getting around to the Chocolate Hazelnut Sables this weekend or early next week. I'm participating in a cookie exchange this year and will be including that in my packages. I'm stoked after seeing your pictures.

I had some extra yolks hanging around, so I made the Breton Sand Cookies from the Desserts book...good eatin'!

Aw, heck...maybe I'll try to crank out the nutella tart too. No promises, but I have a bunch of chocolate that has been around a little too long for my tastes.

(thanks again for this thread...you rock!)

I'll have a go at the Cocolate Hazelnuts Sables too and probably try the Viennese Sables too. I have to make some cookies for my son's kindergarten party :smile: .

If I have time I'll have a go at the Nutella tart again. Last time I made it I used double the butter amount needed. For anyone using the metric units: be careful, the recipe says 200 g but it should be 100.

Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.
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Hey, I forgot to check the book this morning. Can anyone tell me which chocolate is called for in the Nutella Tart (besides Nutella, obviously)? Five ounces, right?

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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Here you go, Seth.

2/3 cup (200 grams) Nutella

4 3/4 ounces (140 grams) bittersweet chocolate, preferably Valrhona Noir Gatstonomie

Curses! I unexpectedly couldn't get on the web from work for most of the day today, so I hedged my bets and bought a pound each of the Manjari (64.5%) and the Guanaja (70.5%). I thought for sure it would be one of them-- most of Pierre's recipes seem to call for one or the other.

Oh, well. More stash for the future.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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My apricot and ginger chocolate loaf cake is in oven right now - I finally got to doing it! Yay!!! :biggrin: I've done the Suzy's Cake before, and it was enjoyed by all. The Nutella Tart sounds good, so I think that will be my next task.

Thanks a million for the lepecerie website!

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I made a pseudo- Faubourg Pave last night. Pseudo because I left out the apricots. Also I did not use Valrhona chocolate because in my opinion it isn't worth the price, particularly the Jivara milk chocolate. Instead I used Droste cocoa for the cocoa loaves, and Callebaut milk chocolate and Scharffen Berger 70% for the caramel ganache.

The cocoa loaf.

gallery_23736_355_1102195770.jpg

The loaf, levelled and sliced into thirds.

gallery_23736_355_1102195833.jpg

The loaf with ganache.

gallery_23736_355_1102195804.jpg

The slice I had with lunch today.

gallery_23736_355_1102196545.jpg

Edited by Patrick S (log)

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Patrick, if this goes on much longer Dorie's going to hire you to photograph desserts for her next book. Beautiful work.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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