Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
chocklateer

Wine bottle shaped cake...

Recommended Posts

Does any one have any ideas or suggestions? A Client wants a simple chocolate birthday cake(chocolate sponge layered with ganache) in the shape of a wine bottle for 90 people. She is okay with us doing a 'back up slab cake' to feed the throngs but wants a good sized cake for presentation. She also wants a label on the bottle with "vintage and year" and "happy birthday so and so". We have a week to come up with a plan and make the cake as the order is for next weekend. We've discussed a few ideas(myself and my partner in crime) ie., fondant or ganache, how to put it together in pieces.....etc., but as of yet no AHA! THAT'S IT! moments. So, if anyone's juices are running, or if you've made a similar cake in the past and have a few-if not many-words of wisdom to pass on I'd really appreciate it! Thanks!

D.

BTW we don't have to worry about delivery of the cake...just packaging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how about a very large cut out....posterboard size.....cut out the shape of a wine bottle the size u want or need the cake to be...bake your cake or cakes and use the board as your cutting guide for the bottle...if you have to use more than one cake you can set the end to end...lay out the posterboard and that will also give you an idea of how to put it together as well (if more than one cake is needed).....a fairly simple idea...as for the label decoarting the cake bottle..im guessing that if you take a look at a real wine bottle you can momic tthe idea onto your cake when u decorate it...as for packaging... a full sheet cake box might be big enough...if not....perhaps someone else here may have another idea


Edited by ladyyoung98 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chefpeon   

Ok.....I'm assuming that when you say, "wine bottle shaped" you mean a completely three dimensional wine bottle standing upright....rather than, say, a flat cake laying down cut into the shape of a wine bottle.

How I'd do it: (and I've done it, by the way)

Simply stack round cakes with your ganache to form the body of the bottle. About every four layers or so, stick straws (or other supports of your choice) into the cakes and place a cardboard circle (which is the same diameter of the cakes) on top. Stack four more layers, more cardboard, etc, until it's about as tall as you want it. At this point, you can either start putting smaller diameter layers of cakes on (to start simulating the narrowing of the neck), or just carve it out from your original diameter cakes. For the narrow neck I carve out styrofoam (and it has to be the right kind of styrofoam-it's the kind of styrofoam that makes a huge snowy mess when you cut it-that's my best description). I place the carved out styrofoam neck (secured with skewers) on top of a cardboard on top of the cakes. I sculpt the whole thing to flow into the neck so there's a smooth uninterrupted look to the shape of the whole thing.

Then you pipe buttercream over the whole thing, smooth it out as much as you can with your spatula, and refrigerate til set very firm.

Now, once you take it out of the fridge, you can do one of two things:

A) put a final coat of wine-bottle green buttercream on it, smooth it out with your spatula and re-refrigerate, once firm, pull it out of the fridge, and with gloved or very very clean hands, smooth out your buttercream. I find this is the best way to smooth out buttercream with no knife marks.

B) smooth out your crumb coat with your hands, and then apply fondant or marzipan or modeling chocolate as your final finish. This is harder, and you have to do it in pieces, and have a lot of patience smoothing out your seams with hot water and a knife (how I do it).

The details......the fun part. A cork would be easy.....made out of marzipan, fondant, gumpaste or modeling chocolate. The labels made out of one of those same things. I like to roll out modeling chocolate (thinly) and hand paint the label with powdered food color mixed with lemon extract. Once dry, apply it to your bottle. Extra fun effect, use gold luster dust mixed with lemon extract for a lot of the lettering and trim on the labels.

If ya wanna go the extra mile....you could model a corkscrew lying at the base of the bottle out of chocolate or whatever.

Hope this helps and gets you started.

Cheers! And pass the wine!

:laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm, sponge cake??? For a sculpture??? Hmmm, is this a standing upright bottle or a laying down bottle??? Sponge cake???

Wull, I haven't totally perfected the math, but something like six eight inch cakes each one 4 inches tall - put in real good support like any other tier cake. Then for the neck, use crumpled aluminum foil or foam. The neck would be like ahh eight inches tall - this is off my husband's merlot bottle.

One of those Chianti bottles in the basket would be a bit easier.

So you're building a 6-tier cake. You could taper the top some like 4-8" cakes then a 7" then a 6" then the neck. Y'know trim it to sculpt the bottle shape. But you want like 25 inches of cake and 8 inches of neck.

If you're a 'it's gotta all be edible' type - use rice krispie treats packed around a pretzel rod or packed around the main dowel.

Ummm, y'know what I would do??? Build a base out of foam or a stack of cardboard circles hot glued onto a masonite board on the bottom. Then sink a half inch dowel permanently into the center of that - like hot glue it down into a hole dug in the base - so all I had to do is slide my cakes down on it - and cut dowel support for each tier. Of course each cake would be on a cardboard circle too. So you'll be icing over the edges of those cardboard circles. So they need to be cut just short of the cake size and have a hole in the middle so they will slide down the main dowel support.

If you get to choose your icing, I would use regular crusting buttercream because then you can just pat it smooth.

Print your label on a computer printer - attach to fondant - or draw it on fondant with those cool edible markers they have now.

Try to talk 'em into something a little more substantial than sponge cake!!

It'd be a lot easier laying down - sponge cake no problem-o.

You have to package it but not deliver?? You mean you need to box it?? Why??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chefpeon   

From my experience, using sponge cake isn't that much harder to use for this task than any other cake....as long as you use your cardboard circles every few layers or so. It's a bit harder

to carve because it seems a bit "rubberier", but it's still suitable. The advantage to sponge is that it's lighter, so the issues of "weight" aren't as bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:laugh: ...i guess i forgot to clarify....i was talking about a cake that is lying down...not standing up....hence the suggestion of a full sheet cake box for packaging...though i have to say i do like the other ideas as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chefcyn   

Our big super grocery store bakery does photo cakes--you might see if you have a local store that does this, and take a picture of the label you design to them to print onto wafer paper with their printer (edible ink) or, there are places on the web that will make custom wafer paper photos, too. If they do the printing directly onto their cakes with an airbrush system, you could ask if they can do it onto a piece of fondant you bring to them.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bkeith   

I've done the same sort of thing as Annie's talking about (mine was for a Scotch bottle, not a wine bottle). Covered with fondant, which was a bitch.

You say you don't have to deliver. Is the customer picking it up? Odd shapes like this are a pain to transport. When you do a normal tiered cake it's heavier on the bottom than the top, and things just naturally want to stay in place. When all the cakes are the same size, the center of gravity is higher, and it'll want to tip. To ensure they get it there in one piece, you may want to make sure the board is fairly large (big footprint gives more stability). And if you really want to make sure things stay put, attach a vertical support to the board (long dowel with a screw coming up through the board into the dowel), wrap it with contact paper and build your bottle around it. If the dowel is the right length, it can serve as the foundation for your bottle's neck as well. You'll need holes in your cardboards and cake layers, and just slide them onto the dowel to keep things aligned even during rough transport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chefpeon   

After I sent my post, I realized I forgot to address the importance of having a support

up through the middle.

Thankfully bkeith jumped right in with that! Thanks dude! :rolleyes:

I would definitely prepare a round plywood or particle board for the base, drill a hole and stick a good sized dowel in it. Then use the same diameter dowel to punch a hole in each of your cakes before you slide 'em on.

As Keith says, placing fondant on a shape like that is a bitch. It stretches on you, and you can't do it in large pieces, which leaves you to trying to make the seams invisible, which is also a bitch.

I definitely would use modeling chocolate for a final finish (if I didn't choose buttercream). It doesn't stretch on you, and melding the seams together is much easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ummm, y'know what I would do??? Build a base out of foam or a stack of cardboard circles hot glued onto a masonite board on the bottom. Then sink a half inch dowel permanently into the center of that - like hot glue it down into a hole dug in the base - so all I had to do is slide my cakes down on it - and cut dowel support for each tier. Of course each cake would be on a cardboard circle too. So you'll be icing over the edges of those cardboard circles. So they need to be cut just short of the cake size and have a hole in the middle so they will slide down the main dowel support.

I had ya' both covered :biggrin:


Edited by K8memphis (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chefpeon   
I had ya' both covered

Why, yer absolutely right K8!

Please pardon the oversight!!!! :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanky'll for your suggestions and advice! The customer has opted for a horizontal cake: chocolate sponge with chocolate ganache between the layers and then glazed. We are going to do the label out of fondant rolled thin and do the writing probably in royal icing(fine lines)and highlight/outline the label with gold lustre dust(don't think my boss would go for the cost of the lasered label). Not sure yet what to do about the foil around the neck/mouth of the bottle.... Our boss doesn't want us to take too much time putting the cake together and decorating, nor does she want it to look "homemade". So we decided to keep it simple, to the point yet effective. Someday, in another place and time, I 'd love to do a cake such as the ones you described ...with all the details and fine touches... They sound amazing!!!! If anyone has a photo or two to share, I'd love to see them! Thanks again, I appreciate help!

D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
chefpeon   

An easy way to do foil around the neck of the bottle is to apply a sheet of gold leaf.

It's edible.

I get mine at the art store in packets of 25. Each sheet is about 4 inches by 4 inches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Chef Peon for the great tip! Unfortunately, edible Gold leaf has been banned/made illegal in Canada by the powers who be. Ridiculous? Yes!! But true...and very sad.

I think we are going just pipe an outline in chocolate where the foil would be. My partner built the cake today and masked it in ganache. I think it's still going to look good...may be not as detailed and realistic as it could...but I think it will please the customer...and my boss!

Thanks again,

D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Plum tart with almonds
       
      Starting from the first half of August, in the shops and on stands appear the first domestic plums. In September there are so many of them that I have a problem deciding which kind I should choose. Small and big, round and more ovate, violet, red and yellow. You can eat them fresh or make a lot of preserves (jams, plum stew, stewed fruits, pickles, liqueurs, plum brandy). Our favorite are big and round greengage plums, or slightly firm violet plums.
       
      Plums have a lot of valuable attributes. They regulate digestion and protect us from free radicals. Dried plums are more valuable regarding vitamin and fiber content, but they have five times more calories than fresh fruits.
       
      Plums have quite a lot B vitamins, so for a long time they have been well regarded for having a soothing effect on the nervous system and improving our frame of mind. That's why you simply have to make a plum cake. Either now or when the dreary autumn days arrive. Their benign impact on the nerves could be a good excuse for putting another piece of cake on your plate.
       
      I don't like complicated cookery. In this recipe you will find a lot of ingredients, but even so, preparing this delicious cake is very simple.
       
      Ingredients:
      Dough:
      250g of flour
      half a teaspoon of baking powder
      8g of vanilla sugar
      3 tablespoons of sugar
      150ml of 18% cream
      150g of butter
      Filling:
      600g of plums
      1 egg white
      3 tablespoons of minced almonds
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      200g of plum stew
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      Crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      3-4 tablespoons of flour
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      8g of vanilla sugar
      1 egg yolk
      Mix together the dry ingredients for the dough: flour, baking powder, sugar and vanilla sugar. Add cream. Mince the butter and add it to the dry ingredients. Quickly knead into smooth dough. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in the fridge for half an hour.
       
      Heat the oven up to 200C. Cover a baking pan (e.g. for a tart) with the dough, leaving the edges slightly raised around the sides. Whisk the egg white and cover the dough with it. Sprinkle with the almonds and brown sugar. Bake for 14 minutes. Take it out of the oven. Don't turn off the oven.
       
      Make the crumble topping when the dough is in the oven. Melt the butter, cool it a bit then add the flour, sugar, vanilla sugar and egg yolk. Mix it with a fork until you have lumps.
       
      Clean the plums, cut them into halves and remove the stones. Cover the baked base with plum stew, add the plums and sprinkle with cinnamon and the crumble topping. Bake for 20 minutes.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Pineapple and coconut – the ideal couple
       
      Today, inspired by the recipes from the book "Zielone koktajle. 365 przepisów" ("Green cocktails. 365 recipes") I prepared a light coconut-pineapple dessert. You may make it without sugar if you have enough sweet fruit. If your pineapple isn't very ripe, add a bit of honey to your dessert.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      fruit mousse
      1 pineapple
      300ml of coconut milk
      1 banana
      150ml of orange juice
      2 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      decoration
      50g of butter
      1 tablespoon of caster sugar
      4 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      4 slices of orange
      fruit

      Blend all the ingredients of the fruit mousse. Put it into some glasses and leave in the fridge. Put the desiccated coconut, sugar and butter into a pan. Fry constantly, stirring on a low heat until the butter is melted. Leave to cool down a bit. Put 2-3 tablespoons of it on top of the desserts. Decorate with a slice of orange, fruit and some peppermint leaves before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Smile of the summer – apricot-peach shortcake
       
      Fortunately, the summer is not only about the weather. There is also fresh, sweet-smelling fruit. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for an easy to make weekend cake. It is excellent for afternoon tea or coffee. A little work and a little baking and after that you may serve and eat, and serve and eat again and again ... I remind you that it should be a weekend cake, so if you eat everything at once, you will need to bake another one 

      Ingredients:
      dough
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      75g of sugar
      1 egg
      1 egg yolk
      1 teaspoon of baking powder

      fruit:
      1kg of apricot
      4 peaches
      2 packets of powdered vanilla blancmange
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Put the flour, sugar, baking powder and butter onto a baking board. Chop it all up with a knife. When you have the consistency of crumble topping, add the egg and egg yolk and then knead the dough quickly. Divide the dough into two parts – 2/3 and 1/3. Cover the pieces of dough with plastic wrap and put them into the freezer.
      Wash the apricots, remove the stones and cube them. Put them into a saucepan, add a bit of water and boil until they are soft. Stir the blancmange powder in 150ml of cold water and add it to the apricots. Boil for 2 minutes stirring constantly. Turn off the heat. Wash the peaches, remove the stones and cube them. Add them to the apricots and mix them in.
      Heat the oven up to 180C.
      Smooth a 23-cm cake tin with some butter and sprinkle with breadcrumbs. Grate the bigger part of the dough onto the cake tin, even it out and bake for 15-17 minutes. Take out the cake, but don't turn off the oven. Put the fruit mixture onto it and grate the rest of the dough onto the top. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By pastrygirl
      I'm watching The Sweet Makers on BBC - four British pastry chefs & confectioners recreate Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian sweets with petiod ingredients and equipment. A little British Baking Show, a little Downtown Abbey. 
       
      Check it it out for a slice of pastry history. 
       
      BBC viewer only available to the U.K., but on this side of the pond where there's a will, there's a way. 
    • By Kasia
      White chocolate whip with aquafaba with crumble topping and fruit.
       
      Today I would like to share with you a dessert fit for a king. It needs a bit of work, but it is easy, and so tasty that you won't regret the time you spent on it. I have already made chocolate whip with aquafaba. Today I added a bit of whisked sweet cream, due to which it is more creamy but it isn't suitable for vegetarians.

      You may use any fruit. In my opinion, bilberries, blueberries or raspberries are best. Cherries would also be excellent, but you may use your favourite fruit.

      Ingredients:
      crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      50g of flour
      50g of sugar
      1 tablespoon of sesame seeds
       
      whip:
      200ml of aquafaba (from one tin of chickpeas)
      150g of white chocolate
      150ml of 30% sweet cream
      30g of caster sugar
      other ingredients
      fruit
      caster sugar

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a baking sheet with baking paper.
      Make the crumble topping. Make a smooth dough with the ingredients. Make a ball with it, roll it out flat and put it on the baking paper. Bake for 10-15 minutes until it is golden. Cool it down and crumble it.
      Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie and leave it to cool down a little. Whip the aquafaba and sweet cream with caster sugar in a separate bowl. Mix them together. Add the white chocolate and stir thoroughly but gently. Put the chocolate whip into some small bowls and leave in the fridge for 2 hours.
      Put the crumble topping onto the chocolate whip. Decorate with the fruit and peppermint leaves.

      Enjoy your meal!
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×