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shugga

Best gin for Martinis?

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although I keep some Bombay Sapphire for those that think it tastes better (or those that think they need a 'premium' spirit even if they can't taste the difference).

Interestingly, in some countries in Asia, Tanquery sells a higher alcohol (47.3%)version of their classic gin.

I added the bold italics because I so often find this to be the case. Back in my early twenties I was working as a waiter and was convinced that I'd already developed a sophisticated palate, especially in terms of booze. One of our bartenders challenged me and was confident that in an A/B comparison, when downing shots of liquor, I would not be able to tell the difference between brands. It's not all that relevant to the gins under discussion here but in a "guess which whiskey" 2 out of 3 contest.... I lost. The brands? Jack Daniels sour mash and Corby's blended bar whiskey. Admittedly, downing shots is far different than sipping straight booze on ice but his point was well taken. So much for my oh-so-refined tasted buds at the time. We had one bartender who was personally offended and deeply troubled when people ordered things like a Crown Royal Whiskey Sour. I think he may even have developed ulcers over this very disturbing practice of brand conscious people.

Last time I checked, the Tanqueray sold in Canada was still 95 proof (47.3% alcohol).

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has anyone ever tried "Gloag's" gin? i had some a few years ago in london and loved it. it was edgey and made tough, burly martini which was just what i was looking for. i bought a bottle and brought it back nearly losing it to the strick customes officer. the sad ending is that i've never seen it again. perhaps a return trip is in order.

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Gloag's is an inexpensive, strong-flavoured London style gin. You usually see it in the speedwells of bars in UK or Asia that are watching their costs, or that are locked into pouring the Maxxium group of brands (Famous Grouse, Jim Beam etc). Here in Hong Kong, the Hard Rock is the only place that I know that pours it. I've never seen it in North America. They have a website at www.gloagsgin.co.uk but it appears to be down at the moment.

It's not to my taste, but if you like an 'edgy, tough, burly' martini - hey, it's your drink! - it could be a good choice. Similar price strong-flavoured London gins available in North America would be Gilbey's or maybe Gordon's.

- Hong Kong Dave

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Personally I would suggest either; Sipsmiths VJOP (Very Juniper Over Proof) or Berry Brothers & Rudd for Dry (and I mean Dry) martinis.

 

They feature in the top ten of this article: http://clubbers-house.net/top-10-gins/

 

I'd actually be interested in hearing if the reviews stack up about the number 1 gin on the list; Monkey 47? Anyone tried it?


Edited by The_Real_Lloydy Link has changed? (log)
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6 hours ago, The_Real_Lloydy said:

Personally I would suggest either; Sipsmiths VJOP (Very Juniper Over Proof) or Berry Brothers & Rudd for Dry (and I mean Dry) martinis.

 

They feature in the top ten of this article: http://clubbers-house.net/index.php/best-flavoured-gin/

 

I'd actually be interested in hearing if the reviews stack up about the number 1 gin on the list; Monkey 47? Anyone tried it?

 

Sipmith VJOP makes a fabulous juniper-bomb high-octane Martini.

 

I really like Monkey 47 too; I've never had it in a Martini but I imagine it'd make an interesting one with its non-traditional flavor profile - a lot of interesting citrus notes (including bitter orange) and pine. 

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I made a guest a Monkey 47 Martini at her request the other night. It makes, unsurprisinglu an extremely complex drink, and as such can stand up to plenty of dilution and plenty of vermouth. I would hold the bitters in this case.

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17 hours ago, Rafa said:

I made a guest a Monkey 47 Martini at her request the other night. It makes, unsurprisinglu an extremely complex drink, and as such can stand up to plenty of dilution and plenty of vermouth. I would hold the bitters in this case.

 

Thanks Rafa! Good advice, might have to get myself a bottle!

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Tanquerey without a doubt, second would be Bombay Saphire, then Gordons

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I went to Dry Martini,  a bar which  has served over a million of its namesake cocktails.  

 

It saddened me greatly to see that they were made with bombay sapphire and the lightest dash of oxidised vermouth. 

 

I like to use Martin Millers,  I've also enjoyed cremorne colonel Fox.  Of course I take my martinis with a cocktail onion,  so ymmv. 


Edited by GarethLangston (log)

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