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Jason Perlow

Eggnog – Recipes, Ingredients, Styles, etc.

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I use a prepared eggnog mix to which I add 1/3 of amount of alcohol. Add even

amount of golden rum,bourbon, and cherry brandy. Chill over night.

Whip cream , vanilla to taste, until stiff. Drop large dollops onto a cook sheet.

Add stemmed cherry to each dollop. FreezeCill glass or silverl bowl in freezer

Fo serve poor mixture into bowl and carefully float islands of cream.

Sprinkle lighly with nutmeg.Mix will keep in refrigerator or 10 days. Whipped cream

keeps dggnog chilled.

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I use a prepared eggnog mix to which I add 1/3  of amount of alcohol.  Add even amounts of golden rum, bourbon, and cherry brandy.  Chill overnight.

Whip cream, vanilla to taste, until stiff.  Drop large dollops onto a cookie sheet.

Add stemmed cherry to each dollop.  Freeze.

Chill glass or silver bowl in freezer.

To serve pour mixture into bowl and carefully float  islands of cream. 

Sprinkle lightly with nutmeg. Mix will keep in refrigerator or 10 days.  Whipped cream keeps eggnog chilled.

What fabulous ideas! Cherry brandy - I've never tried that, but I'm sure it's wonderful...

And freezing dollops of whipped cream with a cherry stuck in them! How beautiful and, as you say, the frozen whipped cream "islands" would indeed keep the eggnog cold.

Thank you so very much for these original and imaginative ideas. I, for one, had never heard of them, and I can assure you I will use each and every one the next time I make eggnog!

:rolleyes:

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I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Ronnybrook egg nog, available

at Union Square Greenmarket, Whole Foods and probably other places, it's

not bad for storebought egg nog. I also admit to a strange liking for the Starbucks

eggnog latte, it really isn't very good but it has an addictive quality somewhat

akin to liking the original yankee doodle chocolate cupcakes.

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If I am going to get some rum to add to egg nog, how good quality does it need to be? I assume a super premium would be wasted in egg nog, anyone got any ideas for some cheap rum to add? Also, any other hard liquors that are traditionally added to egg nog?

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What you need to do is split the eggnog up into 8 batches, and add a different type of rum to each one. Have a tasting, and let us know your results, if you can remember afterwards. Better take notes.

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If I am going to get some rum to add to egg nog, how good quality does it need to be?  I assume a super premium would be wasted in egg nog, anyone got any ideas for some cheap rum to add?  Also, any other hard liquors that are traditionally added to egg nog?

A regular dark rum such as Barcardi Anejo or Myers will suffice. Or Brugal Anejo. Stay away from the Morgan. A white rum really wont give it that rummy flavor.

If you want to use something a little better you could use Appleton Estate Special, Or Cruzan Estate Dark (or Cruzan Estate Diamond, but that may be a little too good) or Barbancourt 3 Star. These would work good and are easy to find too.

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If I am going to get some rum to add to egg nog, how good quality does it need to be? I assume a super premium would be wasted in egg nog, anyone got any ideas for some cheap rum to add? Also, any other hard liquors that are traditionally added to egg nog?

My family recipe for egg nog -- a very old and very traditional one -- is made with bourbon, not rum.

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If I am going to get some rum to add to egg nog, how good quality does it need to be?  I assume a super premium would be wasted in egg nog, anyone got any ideas for some cheap rum to add?  Also, any other hard liquors that are traditionally added to egg nog?

My family recipe for egg nog -- a very old and very traditional one -- is made with bourbon, not rum.

I've heard thats a fairly well known Southern variant, yeah.

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the last time I made egg nog I used bourbon AND rum...and they both came in plastic bottles...hehe...but then again, I also ended drinking WAY too much of it and returning it to the earth from whence it came...

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My family recipe for egg nog -- a very old and very traditional one -- is made with bourbon, not rum.

I've heard thats a fairly well known Southern variant, yeah.

I don't know that I'd call it a "Southern" variant per se... The recipe we use was passed down to my mother from her father. It came in the form of an advertisement clipped from New Yorker Magazine for Four Roses Bourbon. On the reverse side of the clipping is another advertisement "introducing the new 1938 Ford." It goes a little something like this:

- Separate 6 eggs

- Add 1/2 cup sugar to yolks and beat to dissolve sugar

- Beat whites stiff and add 1/4 cup sugar

- Mix whites and yolks

- Stir in 1 pint rich cream and 1 pint milk (we use 1 quart half-and-half)

- Stir in 1 pint bourbon and one ounce Planter's Punch rum

- Serve cold with grated nutmeg

- Makes 5 pints egg nog

Also in our "historical archive of eggnog recipes" is a formula calling for rye whisky, brandy and rum, and one interesting one calling for cognac, dark rum, peach brandy and applejack.

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My family recipe for egg nog -- a very old and very traditional one -- is made with bourbon, not rum.

I've heard thats a fairly well known Southern variant, yeah.

I don't know that I'd call it a "Southern" variant per se... The recipe we use was passed down to my mother from her father. It came in the form of an advertisement clipped from New Yorker Magazine for Four Roses Bourbon. On the reverse side of the clipping is another advertisement "introducing the new 1938 Ford." It goes a little something like this:

- Separate 6 eggs

- Add 1/2 cup sugar to yolks and beat to dissolve sugar

- Beat whites stiff and add 1/4 cup sugar

- Mix whites and yolks

- Stir in 1 pint rich cream and 1 pint milk (we use 1 quart half-and-half)

- Stir in 1 pint bourbon and one ounce Planter's Punch rum

- Serve cold with grated nutmeg

- Makes 5 pints egg nog

Also in our "historical archive of eggnog recipes" is a formula calling for rye whisky, brandy and rum, and one interesting one calling for cognac, dark rum, peach brandy and applejack.

Can you scan this? I think this one of those rare cases where it might be public domain and ok for us to put up.

I like the sound of the one with the cognac, dark rum and applejack. And I even have a good stash of all of those. Just dont have the peach brandy. Is peach schnapps the same?

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The recipe we use ... came in the form of an advertisement clipped from New Yorker Magazine for Four Roses Bourbon.

Can you scan this? I think this one of those rare cases where it might be public domain and ok for us to put up.

I'll have to talk with my parents about that. The original is somewhere in the Kinsey Family archives in Houston.

I like the sound of the one with the cognac, dark rum and applejack. And I even have a good stash of all of those. Just dont have the peach brandy. Is peach schnapps the same?

I don't think it's quite the same thing, but you could probably get away with using schnapps instead.

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Now lets get serious and down to basics...... If its to be made with rum then ....

The only true Caribbean egg nog to named " Ponce a Creme " and has a very different recipe to Northern or Southern recipes, but is true Island and true Rum. and requires a hollow leg to be able to get through the day (s).!

Just ask any one from the Caribbean or anyone who has been in the Islands around Christmas.

If its French, Spanish, or British each island has its own "Ponce a Creme'.

To start The Merry Season, may I wish all 'EGullets' a wonderful Rummy Time and may your glass never be empty......and may the next rum be even better than the one before.....

.......CHEERS.

Keep searching evervbody.......John

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I like the sound of the one with the cognac, dark rum and applejack. And I even have a good stash of all of those. Just dont have the peach brandy. Is peach schnapps the same?

What about Southern Comfort? It is derived from peach pits.

Here's a long time, famously popular eggnog I've brought to many a holiday gathering.

12 eggs, separated

2 1/4 cups granulated sugar

1 pint bourbon (I've used Maker's Mark)

1/2 pint rum (I prefer Meyer's Dark Rum)

1/2 pint of brandy

1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

4 quarts heavy cream

1 cup powdered sugar

grated nutmeg

In a large bowl, beat egg yolks well, reserving 6 egg whites in one bowl and 6 egg whites in another. Add granulated sugar to the egg yolks and beat well. Add bourbon, rum and brandy to egg yolks, alternatively and slowl; mix to incorporate. Add vanilla, mix, again, and then add three quarts of the heavy cream.

Beat 6 egg whites until stiff and fold into yolk mixture. Beat the other 6 egg whites until they stiffen, then slowly adding powdered sugar while continuing to whip the whites. Fold in remaining cream and then gently fold this into the egg yolk mixture. Allow to chill for 4-12 hours in refrigeration (or protected in some other cold place -- like my seasonal "walk in cooler" of an enclosed, front porch for a few cold winter months of the year!) and top with fresh grated nutmeg, to taste.

This will serve, easily 16-20.

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Am wondering if anyone has any simple eggnog recipes (with alcohol) to share and especially any creative serving ideas. I do not have a punch bowl, will get one if I need to...but was thinking for my holiday party that I'd think of some creative and attractive way to serve the nog....I think it would be best to have it iced somehow...

Ideas?

And I may just buy the Nog as here in portland I can get some wonderful organic nog straight from the dairy....but am open to ideas!

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You can buy the nog from some sort of premium dairy. I often do, depending on how much time I have. I add, depending of course on how much you have, but to about a half-gallon of nog, 1 cup bourbon, 1/2 C rum, 1/4 cup brandy. I come from a long line of "southern" cooks, and we always added bourbon to most everything. "And," my granny said, "you need some rum for the flavor, and brandy for the 'kick.'"

Let this sit in the fridge for at least 24 hours to ripen.

Then, just before serving, whip some heavy cream and/or egg whites (depending on your 'alarmist' factor), and gently fold it in. That will make your nog creamy and fluffy, and will definitely help the store-bought stuff.

Another advantage of buying the nog and doctoring it up with whipped cream is that the commercially-prepared product is pasturized. If you're worried about the raw egg thing, and serving it to guests, that is probably the way to go. And you can just fold in the whipped cream right before serving to give it that homemade touch.

For serving, I always make an "ice bowl." You can do this out of any large container. Boil the water first, so it'll freeze clear. Then put some mint or fake holly or something in it, and push a mixing bowl or something down in it. After it freezes, it makes a great bowl. Be sure to set your ice bowl on something that will hold the water as it melts. I have a clear glass mixing bowl that I use. One thing I've discovered is that because you want the nog cold, it seems to work better to use a small serving bowl, and refill it often with cold nog just out of the fridge.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

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Jaymes, that's a very cool idea. I've done that for shrimp, never thought about using it for eggnog. Thanks!

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Killer Egg Nog

12 egg yolks

12 egg whites

1-1/2 c sugar

1 qt milk

1/2 qt heavy cream

1 qt dark rum

Beat egg yolks together with 1 cup of the sugar. In a separate bowl, beat egg whites with 1/2 cup of the sugar. Mix yolks and whites together adding cream and milk. Blend until smooth. Add rum, mix well. Pour into punch bowl, sprinkle nutmeg on top. Chill before serving

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I don't recall the exact recipe but the Glenny family eggnog recipe, adhered to for several generations by an old co-worker of mine, made an amazing drink that was so smooth one could not taste the alcohol. As I recall, it was much like Marlene's recipe but with less sugar and more alcohol. There was rum involved but also a very generous dose of Jack Daniels.

Here's the freaky part: it was made in large quantities (many, many gallons) and family tradition called for it to be stored in the only place where it would fit - an unheated back porch. Our December days are typically cold but often as high as the mid to upper 40's (fahrenheit degrees). This nog was not consumed until starting just before Christmas yet it was never spoiled and no one got sick drinking it. It was also incredibly, remarkably smooth - you really couldn't detect the alcohol, which was at a high level. Was it the alcohol that kept it from spoiling?

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A quick and dirty trick for keeping the eggnog cold - you can either buy store-bought vanilla ice cream, or turn some of the nog into an ice cream mix, then use the resulting ice cream in the bowl as a way to keep it cold. Just drop it right into the bowl.

Works every time.

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article from Slate Magazine

Top Nog Which eggnog is best?By Dan Crane

Recently, I set out with 12 friends on a 70-degree Los Angeles winter evening to answer the question that's been haunting me (and no doubt you as well) for many holiday seasons: What's the top store-bought nog? And how do these nogs compare with homemade? (These are not easy questions to answer, I discovered, as eggnog is almost as universally loathed as the dreaded holiday fruitcake.)  We sampled six store-bought eggnogs—Organic Valley, Alta Dena, Horizon Organic, Rockview Farms, and Silk Soy Nog—Surprisingly, scores declined precipitously once alcohol was added. They were also nearly inversely proportional to the amount of eggnog consumed.

Go ahead, I know you are positively dying to read this!! :wink:

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article from Slate Magazine

Top Nog      Which eggnog is best?By Dan Crane

(These are not easy questions to answer, I discovered, as eggnog is almost as universally loathed as the dreaded holiday fruitcake.)

I love eggnog. It was a part of our Christmas as far back as I can remember. My dad always made up a big batch, from scratch of course, sometime around the middle of December. I remember as a child that it tasted great when he first made it, but then he'd add something, and from then on, it tasted yucky. In later years, I discovered that what he was adding was bourbon, rum and brandy, and decided that wasn't so yucky after all.

He used many recipes, including one (I believe from an old, original 'Joy of Cooking') made with evaporated milk when he was on a health kick. But however he made it, eggnog was a ubiquitous part of our holiday. My dad even bought a small silver punchbowl set just for nothing but serving eggnog. And the remembrance of sipping my cool, creamy, brown-flecked nog (he always set aside some booze-less nog for us kids) from that frosty silver cup is one of my fondest Christmas memories.

In particular, we always had eggnog on 'tree decorating' night. And to this day, I can't decorate the tree without it, because it just doesn't seem 'right.'

However, that said, eggnog is so rich that even I can't drink more than one, or maybe two cups at a sitting. I can't imagine going through an "eggnog tasting." I think that'd be horrible.

I was unaware that eggnog is "universally loathed." I prepare it for all my holiday gatherings, but certainly don't force it on anyone. And at the end of the evening, it's always all gone, so someone must like it.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

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I have used the Joy of Cooking recipe for ever - any store bought I have tried is too thick.

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This year I bought some premium commercial eggnog & poured it into my ice cream maker and voila! Eggnog Ice Cream. Next time, toward the end of the freezing, I may pour in a little bourbon. I realized that eggnog is already a custardy-ice cream base, so why not make it into ice cream?

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This year I bought some premium commercial eggnog & poured it into my ice cream maker and voila! Eggnog Ice Cream. Next time, toward the end of the freezing, I may pour in a little bourbon. I realized that eggnog is already a custardy-ice cream base, so why not make it into ice cream?

I make French Toast with it during this time of year.

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