Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

Hi Faith

I've read numerous discussions on how risotto is made in Italy (avoiding the term "authentic" on purpose), and I'm wondering if you could comment on a couple "myths" that I've often heard bandied about.

Most Italians use a pressure cooker to make risotto.

Here in America, we've reduced risotto making to a fine art with absolute steps to be followed in acheiving perfection. I've often heard that the vision of the Italian housewife laboriously stirring her risotto minute by minute is just a myth, and that most Italians use a pressure cooker because it's quick and convenient. Any truth to that?

Italians use boullion cubes for making the stock for their risotto.

Same thing. In this country, you could be publicly pilloried for having bouillion cubes in your cupboard. Is it standard practice in Italy to use them for the stock for risotto?

Thanks!

Bruce

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ciao Bruce

I've never heard of or seen anyone make risotto in a pressure cooker. I have seen people add most of the water instead of stirring and adding, and lots of restaurants pre-cook the rice, then finish it at the last minute. I'm not as manic as some about stirring my risotto. A really great-quality rice, from growers like Acquarello or Principe di Lucidio or Ferron, either Vialone Nano or Carnaroli, is most forgiving and will result in a superior risotto.

Although Marcella Hazan approves of bouillion cubes I despise them, and prefer to make a quick vegetable stock or to up the vegetables in the recipe and use water instead of stock, which I don't have bubbling on a back burner. I see no reason to be obsessive about all my ingredients only to use an artifical, industrial, chemical product like bouillion cubes.

I have an incredible risotto pot, made of 999% silver by San Lorenzo in Milan, shaped like an upside down bowler, with a curved bottom, no corners for the risotto to stick in. And silver is the greatest conductor of heat. The risottiera, as it's called, was very, very expensive. But I figured it would last a lifetime, and it's very beautiful, designed by Afra and Tobia Scarpa.

a presto

Faith

Hi Faith

I've read numerous discussions on how risotto is made in Italy (avoiding the term "authentic" on purpose), and I'm wondering if you could comment on a couple "myths" that I've often heard bandied about.

Most Italians use a pressure cooker to make risotto.

Here in America, we've reduced risotto making to a fine art with absolute steps to be followed in acheiving perfection. I've often heard that the vision of the Italian housewife laboriously stirring her risotto minute by minute is just a myth, and that most Italians use a pressure cooker because it's quick and convenient. Any truth to that?

Italians use boullion cubes for making the stock for their risotto.

Same thing. In this country, you could be publicly pilloried for having bouillion cubes in your cupboard. Is it standard practice in Italy to use them for the stock for risotto?

Thanks!

Bruce

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ciao Beccaboo

No matter how you cook your risotto, the better the rice, the better your dish will be. A packet of supermarket rice of dubious age will never produce the results of a fantastic artisanal rice. Baldo, Vialone Nano or Carnaroli will hold up best. Arborio is the worst choice.

a presto

Faith

If you should want to make it in a pressure cooker, I've discovered that Vialone Nano works best--it's less likely than other risotto rices to prematurely turn to mush.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...