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Viking Stand Mixers


melmck
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I just thought I would share my opinion on the latest Viking 7 Qt. mixers.

Don't bother spending $500 on this puppy. It is weak and gutless, my whip has broken twice, it's loud as hell, and overheats. I can whip cream faster by hand!

I really wish I hadn't bought it and had instead purchased a Kitchenaid 6Qt. D'ohh!

Melissa McKinney

Chef/Owner Criollo Bakery

mel@criollobakery.com

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I second that! I bought a 7 qt (1000 watt) model about two months ago because I needed another tabletop - small enough for little jobs but big enough to mix up a half sheet cake without tying up the 20 qt. I already have a 4.5 qt KA which is older than the hills, and a 4yr old 525 watt 6q KA. I had been thinking to buy a 10 qt hobart, but when King Arthur had a free shipping deal on the Viking, I bought it instead.

I hate it. The Viking is so loud you cannot hear anything (timers, telephone, other people talking to you right in front of you). It doesn't do a substantially better job than my 6 qt KA. I'm not crazy about the conical bowl design either but I wonder if I'm just too used to the wide open bowls of the KA. I haven't had any overheating problems but that is because I find myself not wanting to use the Viking - to the extent that I will interrupt the poor dishwasher to wash up the dirty KA bowls/whip/beater that I need just so I don't have to use the Viking.

I wish I'd bought the Hobart, or another 525 KA. I was watching Food Network the other night and noticed a Viking on the set - and the host (I think it was Emeril?) always raised his voice anywhere near the mixer just to be heard!

Sigh. Live and learn.

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I third that. We bought one mainly for the 7qt capacity. We've had wires pull off on two whisks - but discovered that the similar Kenwood has a different and much better design that fits perfectly. Still, the Viking is noisy and, despite it's much-vaunted 1000w motor, has a terrible time doing even small batches of doughs.

Viking has named this a "professional" mixer, but when you talk to them about service and mention that you're using it professionally, they tell you that you've invalidated the warantee because you've used it "commercially." That's all bull-bleep.

We're now thinking of putting it up for sale in the local "trader" weekly, and look forward to replacing it with a 6qt KA.

Bottom line on the Viking - I'd never buy another Viking appliance.

Cheers,

Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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I'm sorry about your issues with the Viking. That really sucks.

Wull, OK but there is/was an issue with the 6qt KA professionals.

I have an old fossilized 5 qt KA that purrs like a kitten & is like 25 years old - 325 watts who cares it's a warrior.

So a coupla years ago I got a KA 6 qt pro with whoppee high watts and it was an immediate piece of crap - however they have excellent customer service and they shipped me a replacement and then I packed up the blown one in that packaging & fedex picked it up. Rather unusual return policy- but cool for me.

So last week my for my kids' b-day I got her her own KA - she's getting married next May, a 6 qt-er - wull, she made one thing in it and she said it sounded kina funny (howstupidcouldIbe??!!)

So my problem was a switch issue - where it woggles and is weak and then it just completely quit. So she may need to return hers because her mother can't remember squat. But why wouldn't they have fixed that problem???!!! And I am on several cake deco boards and this happened and is happening to a lot of KA owners.

So as far as I know - it's the 6 quart 'professional' ones - there are some 6 quart 'artisan' ones that are not suspect as I understand this - but for sure the 6 quart KA 'professional' mixers can come with 'issues'.

But but but I did pick out a new color in the exchange - so it's not all bad :rolleyes:

But Costco had hers for $269 - a deal I could not pass up. So the jury is still out on whether hers will need to be replaced but loads of those 6 quart pro models have been bitched about and replaced...be advised.

So I totally baby my new one, I haven't made anything heavier than cookie dough - no bread.

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So my problem was a switch issue - where it woggles and is weak and then it just completely quit. So she may need to return hers because her mother can't remember squat. But why wouldn't they have fixed that problem???!!! And I am on several cake deco boards and this happened and is happening to a lot of KA owners.

So as far as I know - it's the 6 quart 'professional' ones - there are some 6 quart 'artisan' ones that are not suspect as I understand this - but for sure the 6 quart KA 'professional' mixers can come with 'issues'.

But Costco had hers for $269 - a deal I could not pass up. So the jury is still out on whether hers will need to be replaced but loads of those 6 quart pro models have been bitched about and replaced...be advised.

So I totally baby my new one, I haven't made anything heavier than cookie dough - no bread.

We had some issues with our commercial 6qt from KitchenAid. After two months the switch/handle broke. They sent us a new one that promptly died. Third one is performing like a champ. Yeah, it was a little frustrating to have to return two of them, but their customer service and prompt response outweighed the inconvenience in my opinion.

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I chose the Viking over the Kenwood because the Kenwood didn't have a handle on the bowl. I'm stuck with it, I can't return it and feel like I wasted $500, which I sure can't afford to do. My father used to say never buy a new model car the first year it is out, and I feel like that applies to this Viking. Not that the KA 6 qt didn't (doesn't) have its problems but not like this. My 6 qt has never complained once and I use it almost every day for anywhere between 3-6 hours. I guess I got lucky with the KA and am paying my dues with the Viking.

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I looked at all the planetary action mixers before opting for an AEG made by Electrolux and also known as the "Assistant" -

I had old KAs when they were made by Hobart, but burnt out the motor on three of the newer ones, mostly when mixing cookie or bread dough.

I have now had this one for 2 years and it does everything without a hitch, including mixing extremely stiff doughs, such as the Struan dough which is very, very stiff.

I do have an ancient Hobart 10 quart but the bowl hanger is broken and needs to be welded before I can use it again. It is the real old one with a clutch and I can't use it on a counter because it is too tall and it drips oil down the back. Too heavy for me to move.

The AEG has several advantages. It is easy to add ingredients to it because of the open bowl and the lower bowl position makes it easy for people who are not so tall.

A review.

It does not have as much wattage as some of the others but the drive is more efficient and it uses it more efficiently.

I have recommended it to several other bread bakers who have bought it and all have found it to be more than adequate.

In addition you have Electrolux behind it. I still have the first Electrolux vacuum I bought in 1960 which still works. It is out in my storage facility as it is not as bothered by the sand and dirt as newer vacuums.

I am at the office and do not have the name of the vendor where I purchased it. They had the best price and included some of the "extras" for no additional money. A better buy.

I will post it when I get home.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I guess they just don't make them like they used to! I brought my 12 year old KA 5 qt. in from home, and she tackles small batches of anything just fine. My mom has one that is now 25 years old, still runs like a champ! She also has her original Robot Coupe. Thanks for the tips on the KA 6qt.

My 20 Qt. Hobart died this weekend, biiigggg problem for me!!

Melissa McKinney

Chef/Owner Criollo Bakery

mel@criollobakery.com

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I looked at all the planetary action mixers before opting for an AEG made by Electrolux and also known as the "Assistant"

I have had one of these for four years now and agree entirely with your description of its qualities.

How would you characterize the AEG mixer's action --- planetary or ? I am reading Hamelman's "Bread" and he discusses mixing times in terms of different types of mixer actions, which is what got me wondering about it.

Linda

-------------------

"The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it."

--- Henry David Thoreau

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This is a followup to my earlier post about the DLX or Electrolux Assistant mixer.

This is the vendor from whom I purchased mine and have referred several others. (Also bought my Excalibur dehydrators, my grain mill and several other items from this vendor. They are the best, in my opinion.)

Pleasant Hill Grain

They include the dough hook where all of the other vendors offer it only at addtional cost.

I especially like having the timer on the mixer, as that way I do not have to stand over it or remember to turn it off. The capacity is exceptional for bread and cookie dough and as I mentioned in my earlier post, the height of the unit is very handy for someone who is shorter than average.

The bowl turns rather than the mixing head. There is a short learning curve, mainly learning how close to set the roller assembly to the side of the bowl, however once you get it, you will find that it saves a lot of time. There is no need to stop the mixer and scrape down the sides.

I actually don't use the dough hook as much as I expected to because I have found that the roller/scraper assembly does such a good job on doughs that I don't nead it for that. I do use it for cookie doughs, in which I am incorporating additions, such as nuts, dried fruit, etc.

The secondary bowl, primarily for beating egg whites, cream, cake batter in which you want to beat a lot of air, does a great job in less time than the KA. The twin beaters develop the most volume in egg whites I have seen. When I make a frosting with beaten whites and add hot syrup to the whites, there is little loss of volume (and it is easy to pour since there is no over the bowl assembly to get in the way. (Having poured a lot of syrup down the outside of a KA bowl over the years, I know whereof I speak.) This also is included at no extra charge.

I would like to add that I have been a bread baker for many years and this mixer handles all types of dough, from a very slack dough to the stiffest and does is much like hand kneading. If you have ever had dough "crawl" up the dough hook in a KA and have to stop the mixer every few minutes to clean it and push it back down into the bowl, you know how much time this can waste. Never happens with this mixer.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I looked at all the planetary action mixers before opting for an AEG made by Electrolux and also known as the "Assistant" -

How's the noise level on the DLX?

Cheers,

The DLX is quieter than most mixers.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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If you have ever had dough "crawl" up the dough hook in a KA and have to stop the mixer every few minutes to clean it and push it back down into the bowl, you know how much time this can waste. 

If you have a tilting-head KA, not locking the head prevents the "crawl." You have to be sure to stand nearby, though, as this makes the mixer walk around .the counter more.

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If you have ever had dough "crawl" up the dough hook in a KA and have to stop the mixer every few minutes to clean it and push it back down into the bowl, you know how much time this can waste. 

If you have a tilting-head KA, not locking the head prevents the "crawl." You have to be sure to stand nearby, though, as this makes the mixer walk around .the counter more.

I really haven't used one of the tilting-head KAs for bread dough. I have some older ones that are part of my "vintage" collection but they are too small for the batches of dough I handle.

I have had several of the KAs with the elevating bowl and had the same problem with all of them, even when they added a "shield" to the top of the dough hook.

I don't want to have to stand and watch a mixer work, which is one of the reasons I like the DLX. That timer is a Godsend.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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The DLX can handle any size. I have made a small batch for a single boule. You just have to set the roller assemble very close to the side of the bowl.

As I said, it is very like hand kneading in the way it handles dough.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 1 year later...

I love my KitchenAids (yes, plural: two 5-qts. and one 12-qt. Hobart). Granted, there are things I'd love to change, but when I am working with my KitchenAid, we are as one.

However, the 7-qt. Viking is so beautiful. Just wondering if anyone here is using it and, if so, what you think of it so far.

Thanks.

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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I am just delighted. Here's what I love:

1. big motor, big capacity of the bowl

2. I have the pasta making attachment and the meat grinder. The motor is so powerful that neither has any trouble.

3. Did I mention power and capacity?

Minor complaints: the tilter mechanism requires two hands to bring the motor down to the bowl, at least I find it does.

I got mine for something like $230. What a steal!

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I have happily been able to cook in the unbelievably well equipped Viking Kitchens in Greenwood, MS a couple of times and use most of their fine line of appliances. They are all, really, pretty danged skippy. That blender, the food processer and the mixer are all well worth the money. In one case I was cooking with a couple of well known chefs and one of them walked into the conveniently located :wink: kitchen store next door and bought two of the blenders. She loved them. Still does, apparently.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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i recently used a viking stand mixer for the first time and don't like it very much. it may be a question of the condition of this particular one, but none of the attachments reach the bottom of the bowl unless you release the bowl from the base and hold it up against the attachment. or if you push down on the part that tilts.

the motor itself and the attachments themselves don't seem bad.

i have two kitchenaids (a 5qt and a 5+quart which have different shaped bowls and different sized motors). i prefer the original 5qt more than the newer 5+

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I've had the 7 qt mixer for a few years. Originally I bought it because a client was allergic to nuts and wanted carrot cake for her wedding - her allergies were so severe that I didn't want to chance using the regular equipment (well, I guess I just needed the excuse to buy a new toy!). I have a 20 qt Hobart, a 5qt KA and 2 6 qt KAs and this one.

I don't like it for a variety of reasons - the stuff at the bottom of the bowl never really incorporates well without a lot of bowl scraping. Now I use it pretty much for buttercream, and it is awful. Despite the power and capacity, it takes longer to whip egg whites in it than my trusted KA 6 qt. In fact, I have to start beating the whites (on speed 6) as soon as I put the sugar on to boil if I want them to be done by the time the sugar is ready. After only 3-4 months, the whip broke while beating egg whites (it was replaced and has since not had a problem). It will stop after 20 or so mins of continuous operation.

I bought it because I needed another tabletop mixer and wanted something with a bigger capacity but didn't want to spend the $ for a 10 qt Hobart. It was a mistake and a waste of $.

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We were given one by Viking to try, and I chose it over the Kitchen Aid because it's more powerful and has more capacity without taking more space. I agree about the lifting mechanism, adding that I have several times smashed my fingers in a hurry to clamp the bowl down. The locking mechanism weakens with use and has begun to fly up, usually when we're whisking meringues. Pretty fun to get meringue off the ceiling and out of each other's hair, y'know?

The whisk on ours reached the bottom of the bowl fine, until the teeth or tines or whatever you call the wires on the whisk started to come off. It's about half toothless now, so we had to take the Kitchen Aid back from the savory kitchen. When we did that, a couple of pastry cooks remarked that they like the way you can feel the bottom of the Kitchen Aid bowl to tell when you're meringue's ready, which you can't with the Viking. Meringues in the Viking take longer to cool off because the bottom's enclosed int the base of the mixer.

On the other hand, we tend to go through Kitchen Aids at a rate of one a year. We burn 'em up and break the whisks quickly, mostly from holding the bowl up to reach the bottom, which they never do on their own.

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It is my impression that all standing mixers have this problem with either a dimple or an area at the bottom center of the bowl that doesn't get incorporated.

I find this issue with my Viking, certainly. You do have to stop the mixer, lift up the motor and scrape a few times. But I've watched people with KAs do the same thing (although they do have a bowl lowering dealie on KAs that they don't have on the Viking.)

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As a former instructor for the Viking Culinary center in

NY, I was not very comfortable with the less than ease of use. It does have a more powerful motor the 7 as opposed to KA. I have been using a KA for almost 20 years and old habits die hard. Even with a substansile discount i refrained from buying one. They are work horses but not my personal favorite

"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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We've had a Viking for 2 years. We use it in a commercial bakery environment, mainly to mix small batches of batter, dough, icing and buttercream. We also have 20qt and 80qt Hobarts and a 5qt KA. If I had to do it over again I would NOT buy the Viking.

We've gone through three whisks in those 2 years. This was mainly because we were doing marshmallows. But the design of the Viking whisk has the wires simply welded onto the frame. If you look at a KA, there are holes into which the wires sit. The whisks also deformed badly doing the mallows. We finally replaced the Viking whisk with a Kenwood (see below), which uses the same attachment mounting but has the wires fastened into holes.

The Viking accessories are, in fact, adjustable, but it means using a couple of wrenches to loosen the nut on the top of each attachment and adjust manually. Not a very good system.

I mentioned the Kenwood, now made apparently by DeLonghi. It would not surpise me if DeLonghi also makes the Viking. There is a 7qt model. It uses the same bowl and attachments as the Viking. It works just the same. And is cheaper. I've not used one, but it can't be any worse than the Viking.

That's my two cents worth.

Cheers,

Steve

Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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