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Latino Cuisine


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Hi everyone,

Our Chef Association is planning an iron chef style competition. The theme is Pan-Latino cuisine and culture. I'm not only looking for web sites featuring recipes, but also the way of life. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank You,

Harry R :wacko: eiter

I Will Be..................

"The Next Food Network Star!"

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The Brazilian journalist Josimar Melo and his team have a great site for Brazil. It's in Portuguese, obviously, but even if you don't know the language just scanning it gives you a great sense of what's going on in Brazilian food, particularly in Sao Paolo.

http://basilico.uol.com.br/

Rachel

Rachel Caroline Laudan

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  • 5 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...
its a restaurant in Montreal Canada...call  RAZA they are doing nuevo latino cuisine

What is Nuevo Latino cuisine actually? Some kind of nouvelle cuisine style of US and Canadian latin dishes? And what do you mean with latin? mostly mexican or Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican etcetra?

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To my understanding, and based on what Panamanian chefs are doing, Nuevo Latino is a reappraisal of the ingredients and techniques used in traditional Latin American foods and their adaptation with new techniques. For example, last December, the Asociación Culinaria de Panamá held a contest for young talents: there were two categories, savory and sweet.

The winning entry, savory, was "Pollo Salteado-Escalfado con Chorizo y Calamares, Tamal de Platano, Morrones Grillados y Aire de Maiz", Sauteed-stewed chicken stuffed with chorizo and calamari, a plantain tamal, grilled red peppers and a corn "air", a la Ferran Adria. The winning desert was "Golosinas de mi Tierra, Versión Moderna", which was quite inventive. It consisted of four miniatures, reworking of traditional sweets: a ginger sno-cone, molasses and coconut mousse, flan and an arroz con leche mousse with molasses-ginger honey. In other words, going back to indigenous ingredients and reworking them to suit the demands of modern diners: leg of pork with guava barbecue sauce, corvina in a plantain crust, etc.

In other countries like Peru and Mexico, there are strong currents trying to reinstate traditional staples which the Spaniards tried to eradicate due to their great religious -sociopolitical connotations, etc., such as quinoa and amaranth seed, which have tremendous nutritional value and have proven to be far more valuable than, e.g, wheat and corn. And emphasis is also being placed on the importance of certain food combinations such as beans and corn, which eaten together provide valuable nutrients, and on the preservation of cookery techniques such as tamal making, etc.

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  • 2 weeks later...
To my understanding, and based on what Panamanian chefs are doing, Nuevo Latino is a reappraisal of the ingredients and techniques used in traditional Latin American foods and their adaptation with new techniques. For example, last December, the Asociación Culinaria de Panamá held a contest for young talents: there were two categories, savory and sweet.

The winning entry, savory, was "Pollo Salteado-Escalfado con Chorizo y Calamares, Tamal de Platano, Morrones Grillados y Aire de Maiz", Sauteed-stewed chicken stuffed with chorizo and calamari, a plantain tamal, grilled red peppers and a corn "air", a la Ferran Adria. The winning desert was "Golosinas de mi Tierra, Versión Moderna", which was quite inventive. It consisted of four miniatures, reworking of traditional sweets: a ginger sno-cone, molasses and coconut mousse, flan and an arroz con leche mousse with molasses-ginger honey.  In other words, going back to indigenous ingredients and reworking them to suit the demands of modern diners: leg of pork with guava barbecue sauce, corvina in a plantain crust, etc.

  In other countries like Peru and Mexico, there are strong currents trying to reinstate traditional staples which the Spaniards tried to eradicate due to their great religious -sociopolitical connotations, etc., such as quinoa and amaranth seed, which have tremendous nutritional value and have proven to be far more valuable than, e.g, wheat and corn. And emphasis is also being placed on the importance of certain food combinations such as beans and corn, which eaten together provide valuable nutrients, and on the preservation of cookery techniques such as tamal making, etc.

This sounds really great and very interesting!! Especially the chicken with calamari and chorizo, the tamale, the dessert and the way of going back to pre-columbian staples. Which is cool. If you have any recipe of this cuisine I'd like to have some!

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well dont forget what Douglaz Rodriguez did????

and other Chef like Guillermo Pernot, Jose Garse etc

To my understanding, and based on what Panamanian chefs are doing, Nuevo Latino is a reappraisal of the ingredients and techniques used in traditional Latin American foods and their adaptation with new techniques. For example, last December, the Asociación Culinaria de Panamá held a contest for young talents: there were two categories, savory and sweet.

The winning entry, savory, was "Pollo Salteado-Escalfado con Chorizo y Calamares, Tamal de Platano, Morrones Grillados y Aire de Maiz", Sauteed-stewed chicken stuffed with chorizo and calamari, a plantain tamal, grilled red peppers and a corn "air", a la Ferran Adria. The winning desert was "Golosinas de mi Tierra, Versión Moderna", which was quite inventive. It consisted of four miniatures, reworking of traditional sweets: a ginger sno-cone, molasses and coconut mousse, flan and an arroz con leche mousse with molasses-ginger honey.  In other words, going back to indigenous ingredients and reworking them to suit the demands of modern diners: leg of pork with guava barbecue sauce, corvina in a plantain crust, etc.

  In other countries like Peru and Mexico, there are strong currents trying to reinstate traditional staples which the Spaniards tried to eradicate due to their great religious -sociopolitical connotations, etc., such as quinoa and amaranth seed, which have tremendous nutritional value and have proven to be far more valuable than, e.g, wheat and corn. And emphasis is also being placed on the importance of certain food combinations such as beans and corn, which eaten together provide valuable nutrients, and on the preservation of cookery techniques such as tamal making, etc.

This sounds really great and very interesting!! Especially the chicken with calamari and chorizo, the tamale, the dessert and the way of going back to pre-columbian staples. Which is cool. If you have any recipe of this cuisine I'd like to have some!

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