• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
bloviatrix

Your cookbook wishlist for 2004

23 posts in this topic

As a companion to Gifted Gourmet's thread on Food Books you give as holiday gifts, I thought it would be fun to everyone to share the books they want to get receive this holiday season. Let's be honest, it's really more fun to get rather than give. :laugh:

Blovie and I exchange gifts every night of Chanukah. On average he gives me 4 cookbooks. I provide him with a large list to choose from. This year's list includes:

McGee II (this is a MUST)

JC's Mastering the Art of French Cooking

Keller's French Laundry Cookbook

Cafe Paradiso Cookbook or Cafe Paradiso Seasons

Jack Bishop's A Year in Vegetarian Kitchen

Joan Nathan's Jewish Holiday cookbook

Gil Mark's Olive Trees and Honey (another jewish cookbook)

I can't remember what else is on the list.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a companion to Gifted Gourmet's thread on Food Books you give as holiday gifts, I thought it would be fun to everyone to share the books they want to get receive this holiday season.  Let's be honest, it's really more fun to get rather than give.  :laugh:

Cool thread!

Here's my cookbook wishlist:

- The Gourmet Cookbook

- Bouchon

- Bistro Cooking at Home (Gordon Hamersley)

- Lost Recipes (Marion Cunnngham)

- Putting Food By (Janet C. Greene)

- Best of the Best 2004: The Best Recipes From the 25 Best Cookbooks of the Year

and not really cookbooks, but...

- The Tummy Trilogy (Calvin Trillin)

- Best Food Writing 2004

- the new edition of The Food Lover's Guide to Seattle

- Remembrance of Things Paris: Sixty Years of Writing from Gourmet

- Women Who Eat: A New Generation on the Glory of Food

- Schott's Food and Drink Miscellany

~Anita


Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a number of WS cookbooks on my list. In addition, I would add

On Food & Cooking by Harold McGee

Les Halles - Anthony Bourdain

Like Water for Chocolate ?

Really, I'd take any food related book anyone wanted to give me. :rolleyes:


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In all fairness, McGee's book is not a cookbook. Even the dissertation on boiling water is abstract. :cool:


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carolyn / bloviatrix

Consider for a moment, that it (at least, the most recent one) contains 360-odd recipes; so really, you're paying less than a dollar for each recipe.

[At least, it doesn't seem quite so expensive that way :biggrin:]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

French Laundry, Bouchon, Francois Payard's cookbook are no my wish list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a small reward for cooking lunch and putting up with the relatives without swearing at them or waving my chefs knife in their direction in a very threatening manner, I always ensure that one of my Christmas presents is a big expensive cookbook. Around three in the afternoon, I settle down in a comfy chair, permanently topped up glass of wine by my side, and spend a couple of quiet hours reading while the kids break their new toys and squabble. This year, that book will be Bouchon. I can't wait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another Jew here-coming up with eight ideas for presents when you've been married as long as we have can be hard. So, to help my husband out, I told him I'd like these three books:

On Food & Cooking by Harold McGee

Les Halles - Anthony Bourdain

Marcella says-Marcella Hazen

I read through Bouchon the other day at a bookstore. It's a beautiful book. We're going there for Thanksgiving dinner, so I was thinking about getting it as a souvenir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Les Halles Cookbook

Bouchon

The Gourmet Cookbook

Baking and Pastry: Mastering the Art and Craft (CIA)

The Professional Pastry Chef 4th edition

The Secrets of Baking by Sherry Yard

The King Arthur Flour Baking Companion

American Pie by Peter Reinhart

The Slow Mediterannean Kitchen

Shannon


my new blog: http://uninvitedleftovers.blogspot.com

"...but I'm good at being uncomfortable, so I can't stop changing all the time...be kind to me, or treat me mean...I'll make the most of it I'm an extraordinary machine."

-Fiona Apple, Extraordinary Machine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wish Saveur would publish a few more cookbooks along the lines of their Authentic America, French, and Italian cookbooks. Great pictures and recipes.


"Homer, he's out of control. He gave me a bad review. So my friend put a horse head on the bed. He ate the head and gave it a bad review! True Story." Luigi, The Simpsons

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I want the El Bulli cookbook but doubt anyone is going to spend that kind of money on me...

I bought into the hype and I should have invested my money elsewhere. Not at all worth the cost of shipping. :hmmm:


Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Best American Recipes 2004-2005 (how do they know about 2005 already?) - Fran McCullough and Molly Stevens - recipes from the Internet, cookbooks, newspapers. I have all of the other volumes, so why stop now?

Lidia's Family Table - to go with her new cooking show which starts airing in February (I think)

Les Halles by Bourdain


I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After skimming On Food and Cooking, a few glasses of wine down the road, then (hopefully) newly translated el buli, I got the 2002 one last year.

Will settle into Peter Barhams Science of cooking, Chemistry with recipes. By this point wine will most definately have got me in it's grasp.

I can then begin to assemble all the kids toys, which in itself isn't thet bad until you have to place the reams of stickers toy manufacturers insist on supplying with every "flat pack" toy.


after all these years in a kitchen, I would have thought it would become 'just a job'

but not so, spending my time playing not working

www.e-senses.co.uk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Gourmet Cookbook (can't decide if I want the one available now with the controversial pale yellow typeface for the recipe titles, or the next printing which will be easier to read)

CI The Best Recipe (the new one)

The Spice is Right

Any Madhur Jaffrey book I don't have yet

Cooking Under Pressure and Pressure Perfect by Lorna Sass

Subscription to Fine Cooking and Cooks Illustrated (and Taste of Home...don't laugh)

That's a good start! I could go on... :blink:


Edited by RSincere (log)

Rachel Sincere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

American Pie is the only one I really want, but if someone give me McGee I will be very happy as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Gourmet Cookbook (can't decide if I want the one available now with the controversial pale yellow typeface for the recipe titles, or the next printing which will be easier to read)

I'm waiting until they fix it, but I REALLY want this cookbook. (I have the original ones-it was one of the first presents my husband ever gave me. They're so old, they're embossed w/ my maiden name!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, copied and pasted from my already typed up list. Some old some new, some classics, some oddities:

On Food and Cooking (New Edition) - Harold McGee

Thai Food - David Thompson

Eat Not This Flesh: Food Avoidances from Prehistory to the Present - Frederick J. Simoons

Plants of Life, Plants of Death - Frederick J. Simoons

Japanese Cooking - by Shizuo Tsuji

The Eater's Guide to Chinese Characters - James D. McCawley

The Oxford Companion to Food - Alan Davidson

Larousse Gastronomique - Prosper Montagne (Editor)

Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook - Anthony Bourdain

The Whole Beast: Nose to Tail Eating - Fergus Henderson

As a recovering Vegan (almost 9 years) I am eager to explore the realms of animal foods that I have been so missing out on, and I am sure my meat-loving family and girlfriend will be happy to oblige buy picking up a few of these books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really want Alice Medrich's Bittersweet.

Also, anything by Alton Brown (he's a bit too fluffy for me to spend my own money on him, therefore perfect gift material -- also, for some inexplicable reason, my library doesn't have any on the shelf).

Alford and Duguid -- either Hot Sour Salty Sweet or Home Baking, I don't care. These are too expensive -- but SO gorgeous, plus the recipes I've tried (my library does have these) have been quite successful. And no one seems to want to sell any used copies.

I wouldn't say no to The King Arthur Flour Baking Companion, either, but since the only place I've seen it so far in Canada is one obscure kitchen specialty store, the likes of which, out of my acquaintance, no one but me is likely to patronise, I'll have to buy this myself if I long for it.

Unfortunately, our laptop is dead, so A. is unlikely to see this little list o' mine. :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This year I'm trying very hard not to be compulsive about cookbook buying, due to some, shall we say, household constraints. It's pretty darn difficult, as I usually acquire cookbooks like cat hair on a black velvet sofa. Here's the list I sent out to my loved ones:

The Gourmet Cookbook

The Breath of a Wok

Bouchon

On Food and Cooking, revised 2004

The Arrows Cookbook

Bruce Aidell's Complete Book of Pork

Feast

All About Braising


Karen

It really doesn't take more than three bricks and a fire to cook a meal, a sobering reminder that it's the individual who makes the food, not the equipment. --Niloufer Ichaporia King

FamilyStyle Food

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Food & Cooking (new ed.)

The Last Course - Claudia Fleming

Bittersweet - Alice Medrich

The Cake Bible - Rose Levy Beranbaum

I'm Just Here for More Food - Alton Brown (just cuz)

The Art of Cake - Paul Bugat (even if it's out of print, it can still be on my wishlist, right?)

King Arthur Flour Baker's Companion

Bread Baker's Apprentice - Peter Reinhart

Les Halles - Bourdain

Gee, can you tell I bake a lot?


"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is American Pie about "pie" or pizza, because I am looking for a good pizza cookbook with lots of color pictures?


"Homer, he's out of control. He gave me a bad review. So my friend put a horse head on the bed. He ate the head and gave it a bad review! True Story." Luigi, The Simpsons

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is American Pie about "pie" or pizza, because I am looking for a good pizza cookbook with lots of color pictures?

It's all about the pizza pie...but there aren't any color photos, alas. It's a bit studious, as well, but I like that about Peter Reinhart. He has a lot of passion for the subject. Great book...


Karen

It really doesn't take more than three bricks and a fire to cook a meal, a sobering reminder that it's the individual who makes the food, not the equipment. --Niloufer Ichaporia King

FamilyStyle Food

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By JoNorvelleWalker
      Started in on Rob's book tonight.  Nice pictures, interesting philosophy.  The bit about grapevines reminded me ever so much about my balcony.  My grapevine has been growing ten or twenty years, planted by the birds.  Never a grape, ever.  Only recently did I learn that unlike European grapes, the native grapevines are sexual.  This one is undoubtedly a boy.  He provides lovely leaves and shade, and something for the tomatoes to hang onto.
       
    • By Bon Appetit Cookbooks
      This topic was hijacked from the Vancouver Board.
      What cookbooks do you love to cook out of at home?
      Is there a specific recipe that is your favorite?
      Or is there a book you just can't live without?
      If you have pictures, even better! Lets see how it turns out!
      Some of my favorites to cook out of:
      The Balthazar Cookbook - The Beef Tartar is amazing! As is the Chicken Liver Mousse
      The Babbo Cookbook - The Strawberries & Peaches with Balsamic Zabaglione
      Barefoot in Paris - The Blue Cheese Souffle looks JUST LIKE THE PICTURE!
      The Bouchon Cookbook - The Roast Chicken will seriously change your life
      Gordon Ramsey Makes it Easy - The Chocolate Pots are the easiest dessert in the world and tastes so good....especially with the Amedei #7
      There are lots more. Hopefully I can take pictures and show you.
      Hopefully this post can be an ongoing thing.
      I think we are all interested in what eachother cooks!
      Happy Cooking

      J
    • By chromedome
      I've just finished reading an interesting article about a startup, Impossible Foods, which is working on a plant-based burger that will be indistinguishable from beef to the casual diner (you'll find it here: https://psmag.com/the-biography-of-a-plant-based-burger-31acbecb0dcc#.nfqtah12r). 
       
      For a while now I've been following the efforts of other researchers to create lab-grown meats (aka "beef in a bottle") from various sources. I've informally polled most of my omnivorous acquaintances about this, and the consensus seems to be that as long as it's 1) a good substitute, 2) price-competitive, and 3) comparable in nutrition, they'd probably give it a try (I live in a frugal part of the world, and price would play a large role here). 
       
      I'm curious to have the same kind of feedback from any vegetarians and vegans who participate here on the boards. Would you eat a meat substitute that was produced in the laboratory, all things being equal? Would it matter to you that it be all plant-based, or would you be willing to entertain the notion of a "genuine" artificial meat that was created without animals? 
    • By Dave the Cook
      Those of us that have been following Rob Connoley's (aka gfron1) trek from home cook to down-and-literally-dirty locavore James Beard-semi-finalist chef are justifiably proud of his well-deserved transformation to a published author, which he has faithfully detailed in an earlier topic. If you're not familiar with his story, I urge you to catch up, then come back here, because we're ready to move on to the next step.
       
      Rob's book, Acorns & Cattails: A Modern Foraging Cookbook of Forest, Farm & Field, is finally, officially available. This alone is awesome news, and you should totally order your copy today. Or . . . 
       
      . . . we want to continue the conversation about Rob, his book and his future plans in this topic. And just to up the awesomeness, Rob is offering a free book to a randomly selected participant here.
       
      Simply post a question or comment in this topic between now and 11:59 p.m. CST (US), 13 September 2016 and you'll be eligible to "win," based on a random drawing to be conducted, with each participant getting one chance, not including Society volunteers (and Rob himself. Multiple posts will not improve your chances, so don't get overheated.)  The winner will be announced on 14 September.
       
      Rob will be along shortly to add his encouragement and whatever late-breaking news he has -- he's busy guy these days, so be patient -- but there's no need to wait to post questions or comments.
       
       
      P.S. And if you don't win, you should still get this book.
    • By liuzhou
      A few weeks ago I bought a copy of this cookbook which is a best-selling spin off from the highly successful television series by China Central Television - A Bite of China as discussed on this thread.   .
       

       
      The book was published in August 2013 and is by Chen Zhitian (陈志田 - chén zhì tián). It is only available in Chinese (so far). 
       
      There are a number of books related to the television series but this is the only one which seems to be legitimate. It certainly has the high production standards of the television show. Beautifully photographed and with (relatively) clear details in the recipes.
       
      Here is a sample page.
       

       
      Unlike in most western cookbooks, recipes are not listed by main ingredient. They are set out in six vaguely defined chapters. So, if you are looking for a duck dish, for example, you'll have to go through the whole contents list. I've never seen an index in any Chinese book on any subject. 
       
      In order to demonstrate the breadth of recipes in the book and perhaps to be of interest to forum members who want to know what is in a popular Chinese recipe book, I have sort of translated the contents list - 187 recipes.
       
      This is always problematic. Very often Chinese dishes are very cryptically named. This list contains some literal translations. For some dishes I have totally ignored the given name and given a brief description instead. Any Chinese in the list refers to place names. Some dishes I have left with literal translations of their cryptic names, just for amusement value.
       
      I am not happy with some of the "translations" and will work on improving them. I am also certain there are errors in there, too.
       
      Back in 2008, the Chinese government issued a list of official dish translations for the Beijing Olympics. It is full of weird translations and total errors, too. Interestingly, few of the dishes in the book are on that list.
       
      Anyway, for what it is worth, the book's content list is here (Word document) or here (PDF file). If anyone is interested in more information on a dish, please ask. For copyright reasons, I can't reproduce the dishes here exactly, but can certainly describe them.
       
      Another problem is that many Chinese recipes are vague in the extreme. I'm not one to slavishly follow instructions, but saying "enough meat" in a recipe is not very helpful. This book gives details (by weight) for the main ingredients, but goes vague on most  condiments.
       
      For example, the first dish (Dezhou Braised Chicken), calls for precisely 1500g of chicken, 50g dried mushroom, 20g sliced ginger and 10g of scallion. It then lists cassia bark, caoguo, unspecified herbs, Chinese cardamom, fennel seed, star anise, salt, sodium bicarbonate and cooking wine without suggesting any quantities. It then goes back to ask for 35g of maltose syrup, a soupçon of cloves, and "the correct quantity" of soy sauce.
       
      Cooking instructions can be equally vague. "Cook until cooked".
       
      A Bite of China - 舌尖上的中国- ISBN 978-7-5113-3940-9 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.