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sweetpea

Chartreuse and Cocktails with Chartreuse

171 posts in this topic

what she made was

1 1/2 ounce Irish Whiskey (Tillamore Dew )

3/4 ounce Chartreuse

splash Maraschino liqueur

dash of Regans Orange Bitters

stir. stain into cocktail glass.   garnish with a lemon twist.

The Tipperary from the Savoy (apparently via Hugo Ensslin) is as follows:

Tipperary Cocktail (No. 1)

1/3 Italian Vermouth.

1/3 Green Chartreuse.

1/3 Irish Whisky.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

How did Maraschino get subbed in for vermouth? Also, sounds overly sweet.

At those proportions, I'd say the "variation" sounds considerably drier than the Tipperary. It's only a splash of Maraschino, after all, and 2:1 on the whiskey to Chartreuse...

Christopher

I just made Alberta's version of the Tipperary.

I'm not really digging it. It does seem too sweet. my cocktails are sorta large, so I bumped up the amounts a tad. 2 ounces Irish whiskey (Jameson's) 1 ounce Chartreuse (green). splash Luxardo Maraschino. Dash Regan's Orange Bitters.

Maybe by splash of Maraschino was too much? I dunno. Tasting a lot of the Chartreuse here.

I'll give the Savoy version a whirl next.


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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I'll give the Savoy version a whirl next.

Try Mr. Regan's version, too. I don't always agree with the tinkering he does with recipes, but here it works very nicely indeed.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I'll give the Savoy version a whirl next.

Try Mr. Regan's version, too. I don't always agree with the tinkering he does with recipes, but here it works very nicely indeed.

do you have a recipe for it? It's not in my copy of "Joy of Mixology". In fact, there is no mention of Chartreuse any place in the book (it's not in the index)


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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A Scotsman named Harry finds the road to Tipperary

A recipe for the Tipperary cocktail can be found in a 1916 book called "Recipes for Mixed Drinks," by Hugo R. Ensslin, a bartender who worked at New York's Wallick Hotel, but an entirely different formula for a drink bearing the same name appears in "ABC of Mixing Cocktails," a 1922 book penned by Scotsman Harry McElhone who, at that time, worked at Ciro's Club in London. McElhone would go on to open Harry's New York Bar in Paris later in his career, and this is the spot where the Bloody Mary is said to have been created.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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The recipe is hidden in the text of post 65, up above, but there you go, Erik has the full article and everything.

As an aside, I know Joy has some Chartreuse drinks in it, the Alaska, for one. Could be the only one, though. Sorry about the mix-up.

ETA: Does anyone have McElhone's Tipperary recipe? Maybe that's where the Maraschino is coming from.


Edited by thirtyoneknots (log)

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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The recipe is hidden in the text of post 65, up above, but there you go, Erik has the full article and everything.

As an aside, I know Joy has some Chartreuse drinks in it, the Alaska, for one. Could be the only one, though. Sorry about the mix-up.

ETA: Does anyone have McElhone's Tipperary recipe? Maybe that's where the Maraschino is coming from.

ahh.. OK.. Thanks. I went back and found it

Tipperary is a pretty decent drink, donno how Ms. Straub makes them, but I like them as such: 2 oz Irish whiskey, 1 oz or a little less of red vermouth, stir and strain into glass rinsed with Chartreuse. I think this is from Joy of Mixology. Some older recipes call for equal parts. No.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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2 parts Calvados  (get a good and sturdy one)

1 part Benedictine

1 part Chartreuse

couple a dashes of Angostura

This is becoming a new favorite for me.

Sometimes I used Applejack instead of Calvados.

Any idea where this recipe comes from?

I was at velvet Tango Room in Cleveland on Tuesday, and they are going to add it to their new menu. I was surprised that the recipe that thay have is COMPLETELY different from this one.

Theirs calls for orange juice, Conitreau and other stuff (If I remember correctly... it was late...).


-James

My new book is, "Destination: Cocktails", from Santa Monica Press! http://www.destinationcocktails.com

Please see http://www.tydirium.net for information on all of my books, including "Tiki Road Trip", and "Big Stone Head", plus my global travelogues, and more!

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Any idea where this recipe comes from?

Imbibe! cites this from George Kappeler's 1895 Modern American Drinks.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Thought that i would share that one with you:

Green CSM - {Chartreuse Smoky Martini}

35 ml Green Chartreuse (chilled is better)

15 ml lillet Blanc

5 ml Peaty Islay malt

Stir till chilled and strain in a cold cocktail glass - Garnish white grapes.

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/recipes...2/06/green-csm/

I like also very much to play with the Elixir Vegetal, the small bottle containing green charteuse at the original 142 proof. Lovely wood packaging.


Cheers

www.BarNowOn.com

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Champs Elysées variation from Zig Zag Cafe.

6980962321_b7c5627618_z.jpg

The cocktail was a little sweet and unidimensional. My husband detected "sour apple" notes which is not a good thing; we are usually Chartreuse fans.

I see that the original recipe from the Savoy cocktail book uses a lot more lemon juice, so I may have to give it another try.

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I tried "That Green Drink" from the summer issue of Imbibe magazine: gin, white vermouth, muddled cucumber, Chartreuse, lime juice, simple syrup.

8017930450_3572738289_z.jpg

Lots of things going on in that cocktail. Intensely aromatic with the interplay of Chartreuse and white vermouth (I used Dolin). Quite strong. May be better suited to the heat topped with club soda (or decrease the amount of Chartreuse a little). I kept thinking that a tequila version could work too.

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Champs Elysées variation from Zig Zag Cafe.

6980962321_b7c5627618_z.jpg

The cocktail was a little sweet and unidimensional. My husband detected "sour apple" notes which is not a good thing; we are usually Chartreuse fans.

I see that the original recipe from the Savoy cocktail book uses a lot more lemon juice, so I may have to give it another try.

I had a Champs Elysées at Little Branch last night and it was masterful. Don't know the ratios or anything, but it was a knockout - perfect balance of all the ingredients.

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Champs Elysées variation from Zig Zag Cafe.

6980962321_b7c5627618_z.jpg

The cocktail was a little sweet and unidimensional. My husband detected "sour apple" notes which is not a good thing; we are usually Chartreuse fans.

I see that the original recipe from the Savoy cocktail book uses a lot more lemon juice, so I may have to give it another try.

I had a Champs Elysées at Little Branch last night and it was masterful. Don't know the ratios or anything, but it was a knockout - perfect balance of all the ingredients.

That shows you how ratios are key... This is such a simple cocktail there is not much room for error. My cognac could also have been the culprit; it's Remy Martin vsop but it's not really that good for mixing.

It sounds like you had a fabulous time a Little Branch, I envy you!

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Yeah, in my opinion it really is the best bar in the world. I also had a Last Word there that was like getting hit by a delicious herbal citrus icy bomb. I think I'm going to have to pony up the cash for a bottle of Chartreuse..

PS, Pouring Ribbons, also in New York, sells vintage Chartreuse by the ounce in tiny bottles (and hefty prices) - they have stuff going back decades.

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I make the Champs Elysées cocktail with yellow Chartreuse, not the green. I follow the ratio in the Savoy Cocktail Book almost exactly:

1.5 oz cognac

.75 oz sweetened lemon juice

.5 oz yellow Chartreuse

3 or 4 drops Angostura bitters

For the "sweetened lemon juice" I just eyeball about 3/4 of the measurement lemon juice, 1/4 simple syrup. I think it's one of the best cocktails out there. Works fine for me using Remy Martin VSOP.

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I make the Champs Elysées cocktail with yellow Chartreuse, not the green. I follow the ratio in the Savoy Cocktail Book almost exactly:

1.5 oz cognac

.75 oz sweetened lemon juice

.5 oz yellow Chartreuse

3 or 4 drops Angostura bitters

For the "sweetened lemon juice" I just eyeball about 3/4 of the measurement lemon juice, 1/4 simple syrup. I think it's one of the best cocktails out there. Works fine for me using Remy Martin VSOP.

Thanks for the advice. One more excuse for me to buy yellow Chartreuse!

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I tried this recipe, and I really enjoyed it. Thank you!

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Widow's Kiss was our Halloween drink. By all evidence and nature, it needed a sinister name...

1.5oz cognac

0.75oz Bénédictine

0.75oz Green Chartreuse

2 dash Angostura bitters

003 (640x480).jpg

It is obviously super-herbal and spice-tasting, but actually a good cognac cocktail as well. Quite fruited.

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So did the Widow's Kiss leave you with regret the next morning?

A timely revival of this thread. Currently having a cocktail with Miss Fisher (ok watching the Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries on TV) I was going to make a Carthusian Summer but in a rare event, I was out of lemons but had a couple of limes so I decreased the simple and used:

12 oz Gin, Plymouth
12 oz Simple syrup (homemade)
Love the chartreuse in this but it could use more gin or less soda (or both).

Edited by haresfur (log)

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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So did the Widow's Kiss leave you with regret the next morning?

I did actually suffer a moment of unwarranted candour last night, one which I'm called to question with the cold sagacity of morning - but between the cocktail and the candour, we killed a bottle of Scotch, so I don't know which to blame.

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I love working Chartreuse into cocktails that incorporate herb flavors in. One variation was a Pisco Sour with an oregano and thyme syrup, and I added .50 oz of Yellow chartreuse in there to really push up the herbal quality. I've noticed that the taste of Chartreuse develops much later in the palate, where herbal syrups develop much earlier.

As a side note, some restaurants in the San Francisco Bay Area keep a bottle of VEP on their back bar as an homage to Harry Denton (of Harry Denton's Starlight Room), who was notorious for his love of the product. A manager I worked with in my career would tell me stories of working for him and the effect of VEP when consumed in mass.


www.ABarAbove.com

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Just want to throw 2 recipes I've really enjoyed. Nik at Scott & Co. enlightened me one night when I was in a "spirit-heavy" mood. Since then, I've found myself going back to them quite often.

Tipperary variation (I forget the name):

1 oz Laphroaig 10yr Cask Strength

1 oz Campari

1 oz Green Chartreuse

Orange peel

-Stir/Strain chilled glass

The intense ingredients lead to a very complex cocktail. A lot going on, very dynamic as the glass warms up and temperature changes.

A less smokey version would be...

Crossing the Rubicon

3/4 oz Punt e Mes

3/4 oz Cynar

3/4 oz Campari

1/2 oz Green Chartreuse

1/4 oz Islay Scotch (Laphroaig 10yr CS)

w/ a Laphroaig wash

-Stir/strain chilled glass

Just my thoughts, enjoy

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Just want to throw 2 recipes I've really enjoyed. Nik at Scott & Co. enlightened me one night when I was in a "spirit-heavy" mood. Since then, I've found myself going back to them quite often.

Tipperary variation (I forget the name):

1 oz Laphroaig 10yr Cask Strength

1 oz Campari

1 oz Green Chartreuse

Orange peel

-Stir/Strain chilled glass

The intense ingredients lead to a very complex cocktail. A lot going on, very dynamic as the glass warms up and temperature changes.

The first one is Chris McMillian's End of the Road.

The other one looks good too. Thanks for sharing.

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Awesome, thanks for the name refresher. Its been driving me crazy :biggrin:

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I'm another fan of the Bijou, mentioned earlier in the thread. However, I think the other components need all the punch they can get to balance the Chartreuse.

My preference:

Equal parts Tanqueray Gin, Cinzano vermouth, Green Chartreuse; 1 dash orange bitters (Regan's). (M&R vermouth is too light).

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