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melonpan

Yuzu and other citrus

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The article says the flavour resembles yuzu, but with "greater subtlety and depth." It's grown organically, and the vinegar made with it has only been available locally (in Yasumachi or around there, I guess) until this year. The article mentions that kizu may be the original fruit vinegar, since the word, itself, means "wood vinegar".

I'll have to do more research. It looks like the distributor is located in Kyoto (A Zen Corporation) so I'm sure it must be available somewhere near me. Maybe they'll have free tastings??

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It looks like the distributor is located in Kyoto (A Zen Corporation) so I'm sure it must be available somewhere near me.  Maybe they'll have free tastings??

I found this site:

http://azenjapan.co.jp/shohintachi.html

Scroll down to the bottom, and you will see a photo of kizu juice.

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Hello all, this may be unrelated but I'd like some input on possible flavor combinations. Does anyone have any thought on what may go best with yuzu? I am looking to make a palate cleanser and would like to begin with yuzu. Any thoughts?


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Hello all, this may be unrelated but I'd like some input on possible flavor combinations.  Does anyone have any thought on what may go best with yuzu?  I am looking to make a palate cleanser and would like to begin with yuzu.  Any thoughts?

Why not make ponzu?

A thread on ponzu on eGullet: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=59332&hl=ponzu

Mix soy sauce, yuzu juice, and mirin at a ratio of 5:5:1 to 2 (depending on your preferences; mirin is sweet) and add bonito flakes and kombu (or just instant dashi if they are not available). Let the mixture sit for 24 hours (in the fridge in the summertime). It will mellow as it gets old.

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Here are the photos of the Oroblanco (Sweeties) that I bought yesterday.gallery_17399_60_1099693843.jpg

gallery_17399_60_1099693818.jpg

I will be starting the candying of the peel this evening, assuming I get done with a few chores I have to do first.  I am trying to do them by myself as my housekeeper has longer classes today and won't be home until quite late.  I am rather slow at some things because I can't lift much weight and have to rest occasionally. 

I am really excited about finding a new citrus with more flavor in the skin for candying.

I have tried pomellos and they are pretty much tasteless.

I think I had these oroblancos couple of weeks ago in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. They used it for Ensalada Camarones (Shrimps, Cactus, Mixed Greens and Oroblaco with lime juice and oil). Definitely not a traditional Mexican dish but it sure taste good.


Leave the gun, take the canoli

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gallery_6134_1003_13285.jpg

yuzu fanta!

just one word:

yum! :biggrin:

Fanta in the States sucks!!! And the commercial is so tacky.


Edited by AzianBrewer (log)

Leave the gun, take the canoli

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I have found two fabulous yuzu products this week:

At Marukai today i picked up a Yuzu-Lemon drink that tastes exactly like the Skytime Yuzu drink from JAL ...I think it is the same one....same company at least (Dydo).

It was delicious!!!! now I dont have to fly to Japan just to drink it :biggrin:

Picture of Yuzu-Lemon drink

Another great yuzu flavored find was yuzu nodo ame (yuzu throat candy?), a hard candy with a distinct yuzu flavor by Lion, it actually has thin slivers of yuzu peel in it too. :biggrin:

Yuzu Nodo

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I have found two fabulous yuzu products this week:

At Marukai today i picked up a Yuzu-Lemon drink that tastes exactly like the Skytime Yuzu drink from JAL ...I think it is the same one....same company at least (Dydo).

It was delicious!!!!  now I dont have to fly to Japan just to drink it :biggrin:

Picture of Yuzu-Lemon drink

That is my second favourite yuzu drink. Coca Cola puts out a seasonal (I think it's seasonal) Hachimitsu Yuzu drink, served either hot or cold. It's a little lighter than the Dydo one, but also harder to find.

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Has anyone tried Juicy citrus? I had some at a co-workers house. It was lovely! Similar to Sweetie, but it's not the same. It's yellow, like a grapefruit, and about the same size as a slightly large orange. I wanted to buy some, but they were Y189 at my local grocery store.

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Has anyone tried Juicy citrus?  I had some at a co-workers house.  It was lovely!  Similar to Sweetie, but it's not the same.  It's yellow, like a grapefruit, and about the same size as a slightly large orange.  I wanted to buy some, but they were Y189 at my local grocery store.

I was wondering what that juicy thing was....

The flyer for one of the local supermarkets this morning had something called juicy orange (ジューシーオレンジ) on sale for 100yen each. Maybe I will give one a try when I head there on Weds to buy butter (on sale for 198yen). :biggrin:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I am pretty sure this is the first time I have ever seen this

gallery_6134_4148_416389.jpg

Sweetie juice (100% juice)

I really liked it as it was a little sweeter than grapefruit juice. It was quite expensive so it won't be on my shelves very often. I think it was only 330ml at cost like 168yen (compared to most 500ml bottles than cost 150 yen).


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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in case smbody is still looking for yudzu, i've seen fresh yudzu in midsuwa market in edgewater , nj (on river road south of whole foods)

http://www.mitsuwa.com/slh2.html

and also in korean market Han An Reum on 1-9 (tonnelle ave) south of fort lee(north bergen?). i located 3 of their stores in nearby area

321 Broad Ave. Ridgefield and NJ (201) 943-9600

25 Lafayette Ave. Englewood and NJ (201) 871-8822

260 Bergen Turnpike, Little Ferry and NJ (201) 814-0400

they carry japanese products too and a great selection od asian groceries.

but since yudzu is seasonal, i've been looking for juice and can't locate it.

i've been having tuna sashimi with yudzu juice and avocado - m-m!

apparently yudzu has become very popular in japanese restaurants in nyc.

i think it will be a blast in cocktails too.

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in case smbody is still looking for yudzu, i've seen fresh yudzu in midsuwa market in edgewater , nj (on river road south of whole foods)

http://www.mitsuwa.com/slh2.html

and also in korean market Han An Reum on 1-9 (tonnelle ave) south of fort lee(north bergen?). i located 3 of their stores in nearby area

321 Broad Ave. Ridgefield and NJ (201) 943-9600

25 Lafayette Ave. Englewood and NJ (201) 871-8822

260 Bergen Turnpike, Little Ferry and NJ (201) 814-0400

they carry japanese products too and a great selection od asian groceries.

but since yudzu is seasonal, i've been looking for juice and can't locate it.

i've been having tuna sashimi with yudzu juice and avocado - m-m!

apparently yudzu has become very popular in japanese restaurants in nyc.

i think it will be a blast in cocktails too.

I've been seeing fresh yuzu in Nijiya market here in Bay Area, CA for a while now. However, price is high and I figured someone is growing them and so for 5-6 years, I've been searchng for yuzu tree to grow. I finally struck it rich last year and found one online coming from Southern California. The tree is very happy in my backyard now. No fruits yet, but can't wait.

BTW, I also have two ume trees. They are now about 15 years old and produces two type of ume - one larger and one smaller. I use them for umeshu and umeboshi.

Crazy I know, but I also started Kyohou grape vines from seeds I collected and planted after soaking them. My vines are flourishing here.

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Are there any Yuzu-growing experts on this forum? I know there's a couple of specialist citrus-grower forums in the US & Canada but the Japanese probably have more experience of Yuzu than anybody. I bought some locally-grown Yuzu from a shop in Hamamatsu and several have now germinated: Yuzu%2016Apr2007%20sown%205Feb-s.JPG

What next? ! At this young stage (5cm tall) what would you do? Currently I'm planning to re-pot the largest to see if a tap root is developing yet and in general I'll leave it to nature to bring these specimens to maturity but I'm curious to know if others have successfully nurtured yuzu from seed to fruit over the 15 or so years it takes.....

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No expert, but yuzu are well-known as one of the toughest and hardiest of citrus. I would be careful about drainage, but otherwise, just leave it alone and wait...and wait...

You could always try sprouting some other more tender citrus and graft that onto any spare yuzu seedlings! Yuzu rootstock is very tough, but it does tend to delay first fruiting (though not necessarily for 15 years).

Yuzu is notorious for fruiting every 2nd year, but apparently you can lessen that tendency by pruning judiciously to open up the center of the bush to light more, as long as you prune before the leaf buds for spring growth become active - they are the ones supposed to be the ones which blossom and bear fruit best!

I have a seedling citrus in my garden, but darned if I can remember now what it was!

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Thanks Helenjp, I sincerely hope I will one day be considering pruning and grafting! Re-assuring to know they are so tough, here in England it gets down to -6 celcius in winter and I've already learnt that our slugs are partial to Japanese food so I won't risk all of them outside yet (although 10cm high Sansho survived the last winter outside).

The intense fragrance of six yuzu fruit filled our (large) kitchen for days when we returned from Japan in January. I'll never forget that unique scent.

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I just ordered Yuzu seeds online! Apparently, they are one of few citrus that will grow from seed.  Hopefully they are in stock.  I guess I will find out if Yuzu will grow well in Hawaii :biggrin:

http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/order.htm

My Yuzu tree finally had its 1st fruit! I have only one ugly but decent-sized yuzu, which has been in my MIL's fridge for a few months already. Now that I am home for the holidays I can do something with it!

Any suggestions for how to maximize my one yuzu?

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I'd like yuzu ideas too... have 2 yuzu from the Japanese lady at the farmer's market, and might be able to get more in coming weeks.

Will make ponzu, but what else?


Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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I can't be creative about the uses of yuzu. Just use the zest as a garnish on top of some dishes like clear soup and chawanmushi. Combine yuzu juice with soy sauce and dashi (1:1:1) to make instant ponzu.

Or, you may be interested in putting it in the bathtub to take a yuzu bath, like the Japanese do on the winter solstice. :biggrin:

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Yes, I have not ruled out the yuzu bath by any means, even though the solstice is past.

Trad is what I'm after, rather than creative. I can see it on chawanmushi, thanks for that.

And the marinades that Torakris did up there, very good.


Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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Like Hiroyuki, I haven't given to much thought to using yuzu because they are so plentiful. With only one or two I would try to get the most of it peeling taking off the peel and using it for pickles or a garnish on a vegetable dish. then I would use juice or slice it up and use it as a marinade for either fish or poultry. If there is anything leftover toss it into the bath!


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I just made some yuzu pickles yesterday. I got the recipe from one of the seniors I teach. She made them for a Christmas party we had last month, and as soon as I tried them, I demanded the recipe. This took a bit of time, since she was an elementary-level student, so there was much rapid fire discussion in Japanese amongst the ladies in the class, followed by rapid tapping of their electronic dictionaries, and punctuated with Japanese exclamations of, "Gosh!" "Well, I'm not exactly sure..." "It's a bit difficult.." but I finally managed to pry it out of her. She claims she got this recipe from her husband's mother, and she's seventy if she's a day, so it must be pretty traditional. I'm not sure if I got the steps in the right order, so experienced pickle makers, please pipe up. I think I mixed up the bit about the drying, then salting, but I tried them today and they came out fine.

Take about a third of a large daikon, and cut it into thin rounds - around 2-3 mm. Set them outside (or on the heater) to dry out for a few hours. Then salt them lightly and leave them under a heavy weight for another hour or so until they become even thinner and can be rolled easily. I squeezed them dry with my hands, but didn't rinse them.

Then zest your yuzu into thin strips. Take one strip and roll it up inside a slice of daikon. If you're prone to flights of fancy, you may find it resembles a small, delicious calla lily. Put it into a plastic container and line up the rest of the slices similarly, packed tightly together in rows. When you've completed one layer of rolls, sprinkle sugar on the top so that it looks like, and I'm quoting Shizue-san, "...snow falling on the ground." Then sprinkle with apple vinegar. I used plain rice vinegar myself, since it's much cheaper here, but you can do as you like. Then repeat with more layers until you run out of yuzu strips. Let them all sit over night in the fridge to let the flavours come together, and then enjoy as a side dish with dinner. They go super nice with pork, I find, but are also lovely on their own with a cup of green tea.

gallery_41378_5233_126364.jpg

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Erin, gorgeous! And I am prone to be fanciful, but wow do they resemble calla lilies! What a wonderful preparation.

I am SO making that. I can also get a nice big daikon, poss. even at your $1 price point or just above.

Apple cider vinegar? I have that... what would you or your student think if I use the delicious Japanese brown rice vinegar I can't stop using on all kinds of stuff?


Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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Thanks Helenjp, I sincerely hope I will one day be considering pruning and grafting! Re-assuring to know they are so tough, here in England it gets down to -6 celcius in winter and I've already learnt that our slugs are partial to Japanese food so I won't risk all of them outside yet (although 10cm high Sansho survived the last winter outside).

The intense fragrance of six yuzu fruit filled our (large) kitchen for days when we returned from Japan in January. I'll never forget that unique scent.

Interesting to hear of attempts to grow Yuzu here in the Uk. Since I know of nowhere where one can get hold of the fresh fruits. (If anyone does know please let me know)

Just a thought but you might want to contact those folks at Kew they may have some advice as regards growing your trees

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