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Yes, TX we have a season change!


lovebenton0
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We eat and cook seasonally most of time. For us that means about oh, I don't know, say eight months of warm and hot weather foods. :laugh: So when the seasons are due to change I am longing to switch into a new food phase. New vegetables, new cooking methods, trying new recipes and experiments that are geared to the new season.

Mmmmmm . . . . maybe . . . braising! I have a nice chunk o' beef that is singing warm and comforting tunes to me now. Sear me, braise me, long and lovingly!

Days spent in a warm kitchen baking bread.

Visions of hearty one pot meals.

A shift from preparing meals of the past season.

An evening out relishing a rich, heavy dinner.

What are you craving to eat and cook now?

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Well, up here on the north side of the Red River, I have a big ole pot of my chili bubbling away for dinner tonight. I will add some jalapeno cornbread to go with it along with a simple little salad and some deeply cold Tecate to go with it.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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I love this weather, and I actually believe fall is the best food season (or week if you are in Houston).

I'm thinking a nice pot of Pozole with homemade tortillas would be great pretty soon.

Beef Bourignone is also a favorite fall/winter staple

Butternut squash raviolis with hazelnut/sage/butter sauce

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Boy, have I been waiting for the weather to change! Here's a partial list of what I have been waiting for --

Various versions of carne guisada -- I still use Jaymes clear, helpful guidelines.

Huevos del Toro's Work in Progress Chili. And cornbread.

Posole.

Beef and lamb daubes.

Caldo Verde.

Black Bean Soup.

I will also start doing some savory, rustic tarts.

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lovebenton0, you are right on track with the bonechill foods coming into their very own niche. Maybe it's heritage you can't deny, but harvest starts me thinking ahead and planning what I am going to need for the real cold.

You asked on the Thanksgiving thread if I dried my own pumpkin, and this year I must admit I didn't. I was able to trade some elk meat for a large toesack of dried squashes, pumpkins, gourds and corn. If I had not been 'previously occupied', I would smoke my dried foods. That flavor will knock you out in the cold times when it's reconstituted...'que' smoke! Ahhh!

Chili. Soups of all descriptions. Turnips once they've frosted to set the flavor! Good cold weather fruits after the heat has taken away any desire to cook all day. Fresh tortillas, getting into preserves--oh my. My heart is happy this time of year! Cornbread. Hot and sour soup. Green chile anything!

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King Ranch Chicken

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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My oh my! That all sounds good!

Just started a slowcooking pot of blackeyed peas with smoked pork, baby carrots, sweet onion, and roasted red Anas, garlic, stock and beer -- my Tabasco sauce to shake on and warm it up even more. Pot o' rice on the side, roasted green chili/cheese cornbread sticks for dunkin'. Mmm-mmmm!

The braised roast is next. Just had to do something earthy and soupy for tonight.

 

I love this weather, and I actually believe fall is the best food season (or week if you are in Houston).

I'm thinking a nice pot of Pozole with homemade tortillas would be great pretty soon.

Beef Bourignone is also a favorite fall/winter staple

Butternut squash raviolis with hazelnut/sage/butter sauce

Elie

Elie, care to share your recipe or source for the butternut squash ravioli?

And Mabelline, damn! Wish I was on your trading list! :laugh:

I love to use smoked foods (meats I put in cold storage to use later -- like the smoked pork for today -- and smoked vegs too) in cold weather meals. They do add a warming comfort to the cold weather soups and stews. I do some smoky stock from 'que meats/bones when possible to have on hand.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Elie, care to share your recipe or source for the butternut squash ravioli?

It varies, but I usually use Mario Batali's recipe from The Babbo Cookbook for the raviolis. it is very simple, roasted butternut squach, egg, parm.

the sauce is also easy, just brown the butter, toss in some sage leaves and coarsly chopped roasted hazelnuts. Toss the cooked raviolis in there.

Do let me know if you need more detailed instructions and I will check my book(s) when I get home.

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I have to confess that I started eating cold weather foods a couple of weeks ago, as an act of quiet rebellion against this place to which DH has brought me and forced me to live (that's what I say to him every fall, and of course he rolls his eyes because he knows I have grown to love it here).

In the past couple of weeks I have made:

- Curried Sweet Potato Soup

- Thyme-scented White Bean Cassoulet (in slow cooker)

- African Sweet Potato Stew with Red Beans (also in clow cooker)

- Apple Cider Bundt Cake

... of course, I did eat asparagus earlier this week, too, and it was really good...

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Elie, care to share your recipe or source for the butternut squash ravioli?

It varies, but I usually use Mario Batali's recipe from The Babbo Cookbook for the raviolis. it is very simple, roasted butternut squach, egg, parm.

the sauce is also easy, just brown the butter, toss in some sage leaves and coarsly chopped roasted hazelnuts. Toss the cooked raviolis in there.

Do let me know if you need more detailed instructions and I will check my book(s) when I get home.

Elie

Thanks! Sounds simple and heavenly. Before I bug you further :wink: I'll try to see if I can find Batali's ravioli recipe.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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With the weather, I've been trying more soup and stew recipes. They've never been a particular favorite of mine, but they are fun to make.

Bon Appetit (November) has a good recipe for Smoked Chicken, Corn, Black Bean Stew which is good. I made it yesterday, but I think I used the wrong peppers :unsure:. It was still good.

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Elie, care to share your recipe or source for the butternut squash ravioli?

It varies, but I usually use Mario Batali's recipe from The Babbo Cookbook for the raviolis. it is very simple, roasted butternut squach, egg, parm.

the sauce is also easy, just brown the butter, toss in some sage leaves and coarsly chopped roasted hazelnuts. Toss the cooked raviolis in there.

Do let me know if you need more detailed instructions and I will check my book(s) when I get home.

Elie

I make those this time of year too, but with a couple variations:

Sweet potato instead of squash

I brown the butter a little and then pour in a shot of Amaretto.

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As soon as the temperature drops again... I will be making this ragout. However, I almost always substitute pork for the veal. There is something about this stew that says fall to me. Maybe it is the cinnamon. It is incredibly delicious.

I have already done a stellar pot of Camellia Red Beans, using the Russ Parsons method with some andouille. Excellent. It really works.

I usually have to have a pot of crockpot beef stew. It is an old recipe that relies on soup. You coat the meat cubes in onion soup mix. Put in the potatoes and carrots. Spoon a can of Campbell's Cream of Mushroom soup on top. Add a couple of bay leaves. Cook on low for about 5 hours. It is actually the most wonderful classic beef stew I have ever had.

A pot of chile is in my head. I will probably go for Huevos Del Toros' Work in Progress Chile recipe.

Gumbo is comin' even if I buy a small turkey just for that. As far as I am concerned, turkey and andouille gumbo is the only reason for a turkey to exist on this planet.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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With the weather, I've been trying more soup and stew recipes.  They've never been a particular favorite of mine, but they are fun to make.

Bon Appetit (November) has a good recipe for Smoked Chicken, Corn, Black Bean Stew which is good.  I made it yesterday, but I think I used the wrong peppers :unsure:.  It was still good.

What kind of peppers did you use, claire? And what did you think was off?

Even though it was still good.

I do a stew similar to that, with sweet potatoes too. It's a west LA/east TX kinda thing. I use roasted red peppers in mine -- usually Anas 'cause the gardens full of them -- and they are pungent without being over the top hot and messing with the SwP.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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  • 2 weeks later...

Soup and more soup.

The cauliflower was big and beautiful at our local HEB yesterday so with the chill coming in the air andf the thunderstorms all afternoon it seems Cauliflower Soup -- a la slkinsey's Thanksgiving thread -- is in order. I already have the curry oil put up ready to use and the white head is simmering in milk. Mmmmmmmmm!

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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I've been craving Chicken and dumplings, chicken pot pie, gumbo and now, garbanzo bean soup. I'll prolly make them all after thanksgiving with leftover turkey parts. This week I made a nice batch of gulash.

I also made some stirfried veggies with tofu and wide rice noodles, extra spicy. I love me some heat when there's a nip in the air. :wub:

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I have a pot of #1 San Antonio chili from the Chili Queens article on NPR cooking right now. It smells wonderful. Now if it would only clear up and let the sun shine.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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Last night I made a pot of Huevos del Toro's "Work in Progress Chili", which he contributed to RcipeGullet. A great recipe to riff on, this time I subsitited Ancho Chili Powder for the usual, and a smoked Spanish Paprika for the Hungarian I used last time. A sample was good last night, but should be better after aging in the fridge today.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A little more extreme seasonal change today for us in Central TX -- not above 45 on my front porch, in the sun! After 80 yesterday I am feeling the need for some soupiness in my life tonight. I have my deep stockpot with the turkey carcass simmering now. (Hey, it's fresh -- I froze it right after dinner on Thursday so I could wait for the weather to back off again. :raz:) Bird flesh to be pulled off the bones for some turkey and dumplings to keep us warm tonight.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Our temp just dropped this afternoon and I could open the windows and turn off the AC. I am reheating some of the "Work in Progress Chile". We have such capricious weather it is difficult to match our menu to the weather.

BTW... that recipe for chili is the ulitmate. Here is the link. Click here.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Our temp just dropped this afternoon and I could open the windows and turn off the AC. I am reheating some of the "Work in Progress Chile". We have such capricious weather it is difficult to match our menu to the weather.

BTW... that recipe for chili is the ulitmate. Here is the link. Click here.

this is what i get when I click on your link??? Unknown column 'password' in 'field list'on "select password from egibf_members where id = '3306'"

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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Here is the chili recipe from Huevos del Toro. I have no idea why some folks can get to the old RecipeGullet (read only) and some can't.

Work in Progress Chili

I've tried numerous "championship" chili recipes but have found none to compare with this one (which I've modified a thousand times!).

2 lb Chuck roast

3 T "Pure" chili powder

4 tsp hot or sweet Hungarian paprika

2 tsp toasted cumin seeds

1 tsp ground Mexican oregano

1 tsp MSG (Accent, optional)

1—2 tsp Salt (to taste)

1/2 tsp Sugar

1 tsp freshly ground black pepper

1/2—1 tsp Cayenne pepper

2 Garlic cloves, minced

1 Onion, yellow

Beef stock as needed

1 Hunts tomato sauce or El Paso Green Chili Tomatoes

Mexican bitter chocolate

1/2—1 tsp Balsamic vinegar (optional)

1/2 tsp ground coriander OR minced cilantro leaves (optional)

1. Cube chuck, brown, drain, reserving the juices; set aside.

2. Thoroughly mix next 10 ingredients (dry spices) together.

3. Add dry spices to meat and blend well.

4. Sauté onion and garlic, add to meat and blend.

5. Add liquid ingredients (tomatoes, water, beef stock, reserved juice, (and beer if you prefer). 1-2 cups should be sufficient; combine thoroughly. Add chocolate.

6. Return meat to a simmer for about 2 hours or until almost done.

7. Let cool, then refrigerate overnight.

8. Reheat next day - taste and adjust seasonings. You can thicken with regular or masa harina (a couple of tablespoons should be sufficient), but the chili will self-thicken over time.

This recipe begs for experimentation. I rarely use the quantities listed here, preferring to taste and adjust as I go.

Note: Dice more onion and serve on the side. Onions lose their sharpness when simmered for extended periods. Grated Cheddar cheese, chopped cilantro, pickeled jalapeño peppers, crackers or bread, and ice cold beer or milk may also be served on the side. You could even serve beans for those who insist on them!

If you use beer as part of the cooking liquid, Dos Equis, Bohemia, or Negra Modelo might be called for here. Grind all herbs in a mortar, if possible.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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