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Tamago (Eggs)


SobaAddict70
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the eggs look good.

yes, that's the texture I'll like to achieve.

thanks Hiroyuki for taking so much of your busy time to help.

OK, here's the recipe.

1. Make a 3:1:1 mixture of water, soy sauce, and mirin.

Bring it to a boil, and let it cool.

(I used mirin-style seasoning, which doesn't contain alcohol, so I didn't boil.)

2. Bring water to a boil in a pot.

3. Put in 4 large eggs (L size).

Keep them in the fridge until you put them in.

4. Boil the eggs exactly for 7 min, rolling them in the pot occassionally with chopsticks.

5. Drain and put the eggs in cold water.

6. Remove shell.

7. Soak the eggs in the mixture overnight.

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I just provide a link for now.

http://www1.odn.ne.jp/t-hair/ramen/2/nitamago.htm

Rough translation of part of the Japanese later, probably tomorrow.

Sorry, I'm rather busy right now.

In his recipe, this guy uses a packet of undiluted ramen soup (5th photo) that comes with a pack of ramen instead of a mixture of water, soy sauce, and mirin, and soaks the eggs in the soup for only 30 minutes.

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I make these all the time but I have a special twist. I punch a small hole in the side of the egg with the air pocket using a pushpin. Then I inject soy sauce into the yolk with a hypodermic needle and boil for exactly 7 minutes. The best boiled egg ever. They are also great in ramen and bentos. Ive tried injecting other things too. shichimi was good and ponzu was good too. One hint about these type of eggs: the best way to cut them is with a thin string such as dental floss.

Edited by _john (log)
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thanks very much, Hiroyuki for the recipe and your time ...

I made it too.. :biggrin: but not as good as yours.

also I think next time for the seasoning, I wonder can I use dark soy sauce ? cos find that the egg a bit too salty (for me)..

anyway here's my soft-center hardboiled egg Japanese style, many thanks again

216208575O258613435.jpg

Edited by peony (log)

peony

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Peony, I think it has something to do with what they eat. Here in Singapore, they have 'carrot' and 'corn' fed chickens and their eggs come out orange or yellow!

As for Japanese hardboiled, I recall in the El Bulli book, Ferran Adria was at a Japanese restaurant in NY or Japan (Cannot remember where) and he had this same egg with the liquid centre.

The generous chef shared the recipe with him and the El Bulli book calls it the 7/70 Egg or something to that effect. Basically, 7 minutes in 70 degrees celsius water.

Of course you will need an induction cooker like the CookTek to maintain that temperature accurately for 7 minutes......

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thanks very much, Hiroyuki for the recipe and your time ...

I made it too.. :biggrin:  but not as good as yours.

also I think next time for the seasoning, I wonder can I use dark soy sauce ? cos find that the egg a bit too salty (for me)..

anyway here's my soft-center hardboiled egg Japanese style, many thanks again

216208575O258613435.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

I just did a tutorial for making dashimaki tamago (or tamagoyaki) here with recipes if anyone's interested. Some tips sourced from Japanese cookbooks Kihon no Washoku Recipe (基本の和食レシピ)、Washoku no Kihon (和食の基本)、and Non-No Washoku Hyakka (NON-NO和食百科)。

gallery_8185_4874_133868.jpg

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I just did a tutorial for making dashimaki tamago (or tamagoyaki) here with recipes if anyone's interested. Some tips sourced from Japanese cookbooks Kihon no Washoku Recipe (基本の和食レシピ)、Washoku no Kihon (和食の基本)、and Non-No Washoku Hyakka (NON-NO和食百科)。

gallery_8185_4874_133868.jpg

Those are very nice pictures. And, you have two tamagoyaki pans! :laugh:

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Those are very nice pictures.  And, you have two tamagoyaki pans!  :laugh:

Thanks shinju! The little tamagoyaki pan on the top cost me a grand total of US$1.50 at a Japanese dollar store in San Francisco, so I couldn't resist. Unfortunately the quality is really poor (duh), so I don't use it as much as the good one underneath. :-)

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Shinju, I just saw your video tutorial on youtube. It was FANTASTIC! I have seen so many photographs and read so many explanations of how to make rolled Japanese-style omelet but I could never figure it out until I saw how you did it in the video. ARIGATOU! I am going to try it at home now.

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I made atsuyaki tamago for the first time in my twenties, soon after I learned a recipe from Doi Masaru's cooking program on NHK, which was similar to Bigfoot's except the use of chopsticks instead of a turner to roll the tamago. Soon I got tired of following the recipe exactly, and now I have simplified the recipe considerably. Up until ten years ago, I used to make it almost every weekday for my wife's bento, partly because I was better at making it than my wife.

Just in case you are wondering, as I mentioned upthread, atsuyaki tamago is mainly eaten in Kanto, while dashimaki tamago (less sweet than the former) is mainly eaten in Kansai.

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  • 1 month later...

Are tamagoyaki pans ever made in the same thickness and quality as, say, a Calphalon nonstick skillet? And if so, how would I go about getting one in the U.S.?

I bought the one I have at Seattle's Uwajimaya. There were three to choose from. Two were small, rectangular pans, made in China of very thin metal with an obviously cheap nonstick coating. The one I bought was a larger square pan, made in Japan of thicker (but still pretty darn thin) metal, with a nicer (but still pretty darn cheap) nonstick coating. Despite my assiduous swabbing with an oily paper towel between layers, my tamagoyaki still sticks like crazy. Half the time I give up and start over using my 8" Calphalon nonstick skillet. It comes out beautifully in that (but in a weird shape, of course), so I know I'm not completely inept. I'm wondering if it would be possible to purchase a tamagoyaki pan of the same quality. What brand should I look for? Can anyone point me to a site that would sell such an item?

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I could be wrong, but I don't think the best tamagoyaki pans (restaurant or "professional" use) will have a non-stick coating. The link below shows the type that is sold to restaurants in Japan. The smallest ones start at just over 3,000 yen. The description doesn't say a lot about the construction, except that it's welded steel.

http://www.ippintei.com/page045.html

Unfortunately, I have no idea where to get a similar pan here in North America. Perhaps you could ask someone from Japan to order one for you and forward it to you.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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Well, duh. Having never seen a tamagoyaki pan that wasn't nonstick, it didn't occur to me to look for a regular one. But of course tamagoyaki has been around since before the advent of nonstick coatings! I do think I'd like to find a nonstick pan if possible, and I like the look of the ridged one in the link Fugu provided. That's not the one you have, though, Fugu? Has anyone used a ridge pan before?

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I do think I'd like to find a nonstick pan if possible, and I like the look of the ridged one in the link Fugu provided. That's not the one you have, though, Fugu? Has anyone used a ridge pan before?

No, I have the smaller nonstick pan. I have one those larger, professional tamagoyaki pans but I have a difficult time rolling the tamago. The smaller tamagoyaki is easier to manage and I would recommend for a beginner like myself.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I finally bought a rectangular tamagoyaki pan today, which measures 13 cm x 18 cm and costs a little less than 800 yen.

gallery_16375_4595_15675.jpg

At the first attempt to make atsuyaki tamago in this new pan, I had some difficulity flipping it, and it broke into two pieces when I tried to flip it after pouring the second one-third of the tamago mixture. I somehow managed to get it back into shape.

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Does anyone have a good recipe for that SUPER-SPONGEY tamago-yaki?  I think it has some finely ground fish in it.  It is sweetened, and has an almost sponge cake texture.  I had it once in a Japanese restaurant, and never had it since, but the memories still haunt me.  Ideas please? 

Thanks!

Oh, you like something I hate...

I found one

http://www.shiogamagas.co.jp/cooking/2005_04.htm

Ingredients for 10 servings

250g surimi (ground fish meat) of cod or other fish

150 sugar

A small amount of dashi

120 cc sake

7 eggs

1. Put yolks, surimi, sugar, dashi, and sake in a blender and mix until slightly sticky.

2. Whip whites until stiff.

3. Mix them together, put in a mold, and put in the oven.

Bake for 50 min. at 150C.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I wonder if someone would be able to identify this preparation and provide a an English language cookbook reference/recipe?

An egg preparation where the eggs, scrambled(?) are placed in shapes like scallops, and with some device, charred dark streaks (?) are made on them to further create the impression of the ridges of a scallop shell.

Perhaps the dark streaks are made by some tare sauce, but the effect is to produce a facsimile of several scallop shells arranged on a plate.

Many thanks.

gautam

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