Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

Thanks, Kris. 

To achieve the look of the first link above, I think there must be a second stage where the egg is peeled, then cooked in the broth or some kind of sauce so it takes on some flavor and color.  I'll play with that a bit...  Much appreciated!

~Tad

For ajitsuke 味付け半熟卵 hanjuku tamago, you don't cook the egg any further of the yolk will harden. The peeled eggs are placed into a bag/bowl/tupperware with the seasonings for anywhere from 30 minutes to overnight. Much longer and they will become too salty.

A simple recipe is equal amounts of soy sauce, sake and mirin with a pinch of dashi powder and some sliced garlic. In a pinch they could be marinated in tsuyu.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The old foodie blog mentioned in another thread on another forum has a link to a method for making coddled eggs, which is just onsen tamago by another name. However, the Cunning Device mentioned is to warm your saucepan with boiling water, empty it out, place eggs in and slam lid on for a few minutes to take the chill off the shells, THEN pour near-boing water over and leave for 12 minutes. Just made one to encourage a morosely studying son1, and it turned out perfectly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

So, in the spirit of the "great niboshi cookoff" (see the dashi thread) I have completed the great "japanese ramen egg" cookoff. Here is the method and results.

Bring a pot of water to a boil. poke a hole with a push pin in the non-pointy end of the egg. add the room temperature eggs to the boiling water using a spoon to lower them in. Let the water return to a boil. Boil the eggs for 5 minutes to produce ramen eggs and 6 minutes to produce salad eggs. Remove the eggs from the boiling water and let them stand for one minute and then run them under cold water for 5 minutes. crack the eggs all over with the back of a spoon and then peel. Then marinate the eggs overnight in a mixture of dashi:soy sauce:mirin 2:1:1, I also add a pinch of shichimi tougarashi. I use the same liquid over and over again, I then freeze it. I also use this liquid for boiling daikon to make oden style daikon. To achieve the perfect sliced eggs first cut in to the egg white and the split the egg open the rest of the way by hand. below you can see eggs that were boiled 4, 5, and 6 minutes respectively. 4 minutes makes a coddled egg which is almost impossible to peel, you can see the raw yolk. 5 minutes changes the color of the yolk and slightly thickens it, as you can see it still flows freely. 6 minutes produces a yolk that is not over cooked and will not flow freely. The eggs below are unmarinated, marinating them firms the yolks slightly. enjoy!

gallery_23727_2765_7754.jpg

Edited by _john (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Small yellow kids?? I have no idea. Could you be more specific?

Tamago can be used figuratively to mean someone in embryo or in the making.

Thus,

Kin no tamago (golden egg): Someone young who is expected to become a good employee of a company.

Sensei no tamago (teacher egg): Someone who is studying to become a teacher.

Link to post
Share on other sites
卵(P); 玉子 【たまご】 (n) (1) egg(s); spawn; roe; (n) (2) (玉子 only) cooked (usually boiled) hen egg; (n) (3) (卵 only) (an expert) in the making; (P)

I assume you are asking what the etymology (語源) of the word is. Tamago is written in two ways the first way it is written is 卵. I'm not sure of the origin of this kanji. The second way of writing it is 玉子 where 玉 "tama" means ball and 子 "ko" means child. Below I have pasted some info for Japanese speakers about when to use 玉子 or 卵.

Q:“玉子”と“卵”。どちらがホント?

A

漢字で たまご と書くとき、どちらの漢字を使うのか迷ってしまいますよね。

歴史をさかのぼってみると、日本書記のなかに『古に天地未だ剖れず、陰陽分かれざりしとき、渾沌れたること鶏子(とりこ)の如くして、ほのかに牙を含めり』という1文があります。

中国の古書『三五歴記』の中にも同じ字綴りが出てくることから、古代中国・日本では“鶏子”という表記をしていたようです。

では、“玉子”と“卵”はどこからきたのでしょう。

“玉子”のルーツにははっきりした説がなく、たまごの形(玉のような子)からきた当て字・・・というのが最も有力です。“卵”の方はボラの卵巣、いわゆる からすみ をかたどった象形文字で、もともとは 魚のたまご のことをさしていたようです。

広辞苑をひいてみると、“たまご(卵・玉子)”となっており、やはりどちらも 正しい表記ということになります。ただ通説として、生の状態のものを 卵、調理済みのもの(ゆでたまご等)を 玉子 と書くのが 一般的です。

quote is from here

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is another theory:

Tamago in the biological sense: 卵

Tamago as food: 玉子

I hated the 玉子 spelling because I thought it was an ateji (phonetic equivalent). Maybe I was wrong.

I think I better spell it たまご to avoid all this silly confusion.

Link to post
Share on other sites
When I first came across this page on tamago kake gohan, I just laughed.  Come to think of it, it's a great topic!! :biggrin:

Check out this page and learn the authentic way of making tamago kake gohan!! :biggrin:  :biggrin:

Interesting! a whole page of wikipedia on tamago kake gohan. :biggrin:

Maybe I should I have my husband read it because he makes his wrong if that is the proper way. He cracks the egg open right on top of the rice and then pours on the soy sauce and then mixes it. He also adds mayo and sometimes butter as well...

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
When I first came across this page on tamago kake gohan, I just laughed.  Come to think of it, it's a great topic!! :biggrin:

Check out this page and learn the authentic way of making tamago kake gohan!! :biggrin:  :biggrin:

Interesting! a whole page of wikipedia on tamago kake gohan. :biggrin:

Maybe I should I have my husband read it because he makes his wrong if that is the proper way. He cracks the egg open right on top of the rice and then pours on the soy sauce and then mixes it. He also adds mayo and sometimes butter as well...

That is the proper way!!

And I think that step 4 is the most important:

4. Dig a hollow in the center of the cooked rice in the Chawan (茶碗, a rice bowl) using chopsticks.
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...
One of my favorite dishes that can use pretty much anything in the kitchen is tamago-toji. Protein/vegetables are either sauteed and then simmered or just started out simmering in a lightly seasoned sauce.

I use a simple sauce of 1 cup dashi with 1 tablespoon each of soy sauce, sake, mirin and sugar.

After everything is cooked through, lightly mix some eggs in a bowl (I use 3 large ones) then pour it over everything in the pan. Lower the heat, put on a lid and simmer until your liking. I like mine a bit on the runny side.

My most recent version consisted of tofu (first browned in the pan) and mitsuba (trefoil), the kids devoured it. :biggrin:

gallery_6134_1960_30211.jpg

Another tamago-toji dish, this time with beef, gobo and mitsuba

gallery_6134_4148_415240.jpg

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
thanks for this link, but I can't read Japanese.

would appreciate if you do have the time to do the translation, but no hurry.

thanks.

Did you look at the link in Hiroyuki's second post? It's explained pretty clearly, and in English, too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
thanks for this link, but I can't read Japanese.

would appreciate if you do have the time to do the translation, but no hurry.

thanks.

Did you look at the link in Hiroyuki's second post? It's explained pretty clearly, and in English, too.

Thanks. But I'm thinking of making ajitama by referring to both recipes in a day or two. I'll report back.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...