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Susan in FL

eG Foodblog: Prepcook and Susan in FL

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Is it over already? Thanks for the vicarious trip to the beach! Life's a real beach for you two when you're having fun. :biggrin:


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Au revoir, Susan.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Thank you so much, Susan & Russ. It has been an enjoyable week and a lovely blog! I'll be sure to pick your brains for restaurants when we head down to the Daytona 500 in February.


Barbara Laidlaw aka "Jake"

Good friends help you move, real friends help you move bodies.

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Can you tell me a little more about sorrel?  I've never cooked with it, and don't actually know anything about it.  There is something in my brain that says it's a sharp/tangy/lemony flavor, but I'm not sure of that, since the recipe tells you to sub spinach if sorrel is unavailable.

Sorrel's tangy sourness comes from the high level of oxalate/oxalic acid in the leaves.

Although spinach does not have as distinctively sour a flavor, it also contains a lot of oxalate/oxalic acid. You know the weird "coated" feeling that your teeth get if you eat spinach, particularly if it's raw? That's the oxalate.

Both sorrel and spinach are on the "no" list for people who tend to form oxalate kidney stones.

Very nice blog, Susan and Prepcook. Thanks for sharing your lives with us.


Can you pee in the ocean?

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We are glad you all enjoyed the blog from the beach, and again thanks for the kind words. We had great fun doing it, every sunshiney day. Got up this morning, we're not blogging, and there was no sunshine... :sad: It's the first cloudy, rainy day we've had for days and days. But our spirits will surely be brightened by this! Click here... see you there! :smile:


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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The sorrel discussion is so timely for me!  I'm trying to use my sorrel before it all freezes for the winter, and had been planning to post a question asking what people do with it.  My favorite recipe for its use comes from Judi Rodgers' Zuni Cafe Cookbook.  She has a chard-and-onion panade recipe with a sorrel variation.  It's a favorite dish at our house.  Basically it's sliced onions, cooked down until almost caramelized, layered with leaves of sorrel and chunks of bread that have been tossed with olive oil and seasonings, then chicken broth poured into the casserole and the whole lot cooked.  It puffs up beautifully and tastes terrific, and the sorrel's unfortunate army drab color doesn't matter a whit.  The color of cooked sorrel generally puts me off, so I'm always on the lookout for recipes that will disguise the appearance while preserving the flavor.  I make a sorrel sauce for use over pecan-crusted salmon (I forget whose recipe) and it's very tasty but looks horrid.  Another dish for turning the lights down low.

...

...

Great sorrel input, thank you so much. I know what you mean about the color... The last time I made the fish and mashed potatoes and sorrel dish, I put the sorrel in at the very, very end, and it kept the bright green color. It was great.

We want to try your Zuni Cafe Cookbook recipe.

Yes, oh what a case for turning the lights down low. :laugh:

I'm glad this topic hasn't been locked yet, because I realized this morning I'd forgotten a crucial ingredient in the panade: shredded (or grated) fontina cheese. It's layered with the other solid ingredients and gives the dish a wonderful creaminess. For precise instructions you still have to go to The Zuni Cafe Cookbook - a cookbook I recommend on many counts - but if you're winging it, you need to know about that cheese!

Great blog! Sorry I'm adding on so late, but I'm glad I could correct my earlier post.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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We're glad too that it wasn't locked yet, thanks! We want to make this soon.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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But... time to lock now! Bye!

Further developments can be spun off into new threads.


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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