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Those Bacon Wrapped Hot Dogs


Chris Cognac
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What makes these things so damn good...is it the many cerveza's consumed prior....but man are they good..anyone know how they are made and what makes em special...let hear it from all of you whom have cruised a border town, eaten one and lived to tell about it!

Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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i first heard about these from my 17 yr old culinarian, who spoke in rapt prose about these delicacies---best, he claims, when cooked in a parking lot, over an open trashcan (or oil drum) fire. i thought he had been smokin' something. i have come to know that there are others who are aficianados of these 'dogs. (i eat a lot of weird stuff, at least according to my children, but i can't bring myself to eat a hotdog...bacon-wrapped-just-about-anything-else, bring it, but hotdogs, i'm gonna pass...)

i once stumbled across a recipe that he said looked like a good start. of course, i can't find it now, but googled this up--gives a description, and a jumping-off point.

clickety

"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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For the World Series we had a friend whip up some "Polish Twinkies" which consists of a hotdog split down the middle, filled with cream

cheese, wrapped in bacon and then deepfried. They were horrible and that's why I only ate five.

Jarad C. Slipp, One third of ???

He was a sweet and tender hooligan and he swore that he'd never, never do it again. And of course he won't (not until the next time.) -Stephen Patrick Morrissey

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Jason, I have tried and failed to duplicate it...I think it might have to do with the dogs and bacon itself...You would have to try and get the same kind they have in Mexico....I think I will cruise up to Lennox (a small area of L.A. that might as well be Mexico) and learn the secret if I can...

Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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My goodness. And I thought bacon-wrapped hot dogs were a US specialty. I occasionally treat my husband to them as they are one of his comfort foods.

But not, definitely not, with a regular Mexican hot dog, an object I approach with extreme caution. You can get good bacon here but I only buy hot dogs from a deli owner who gets them from a German(I think) source in Mexico City,

Rachel

Rachel Caroline Laudan

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I've rolled bacon which was partially roasted and then wrapped around good German Franks.

Place the Bacon wrapped franks into the smoker at 200ºF for about 45 minutes, indirect heat, man these things will just about take your head off, they are so good.

Do stick bologna the same way, sans the bacon. For a special treat smoke the bologna for about 45 minutes, slice into 1/2" thick slices and then hit it into the deep fryer for a minute.

Slap the slice covered in mustard between two slices of bread, and bite.

woodburner

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Any one have a pic of those Mexican dogs?

I've never eaten bacon wrapped dogs in Mexico, but possibly Chris could comment on this photo??

Bacon Wrapped click on this

As seen in the photo, the bacon, when wrapped around the dog, needs to be sliced very thin, in order for both the dog and the bacon to fry up "done" at the same time.

My version of "par cooked" bacon works well with most pre-pacakaged, and pre-sliced bacon, predicated that both will become done at the same time.

By the way, my slow smoked hot dogs done in a 200ºf cooker, can be done in a toaster oven, for those without a smoker. When the dog is cooked at low and slow temperatures, it plumps, in appearance as if pumped with air, without splitting, to which it retains all that wonderful dog juice.

woodburner

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I'll be out and about in Pátzcuaro tonight and tomorrow night and will take a picture of the famous Mexican bacon-wrapped hot dogs as they are being cooked, if I see a cart. They do look something like woodburner's photo, only moreso.

Fud is a well-known brand name in Mexico; the company makes hot dogs, processed hams (both regular and turkey), and a long list of other deli meats as well as a whole host of other products. Of course the brand name is pronounced 'FOOD'.

In just a couple of hours I'll be heading out for Pátzcuaro. On the list of food stops: 1) early lunch today in Zamora, Michoacán for the best carnitas I've ever had anywhere; 2) late supper tonight on the small plaza in Pátzcuaro--enchiladas placeras, and my mouth is already watering; 3) breakfast corundas tomorrow with Don Juan, ditto for the watering mouth; and 4) Friday breakfast: uchepos, uchepos, uchepos, eaten on the street, hot out of the steamer. No hot dogs this time.

Meet me there!

Esperanza

What's new at Mexico Cooks!?

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Cant wait to see the photos...I am also interested to see if the bacon is par cooked, then wrapped and the whole thing is slow cooked...MAn, it "ALMOST" makes me want to go down to Tijuana for one right now...But I can always go to Langers....the ladies on the street sell em just outside Langers!

Moo, Cluck, Oink.....they all taste good!

The Hungry Detective

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Unfortunately the hamburger/hot dog cart guy on the small plaza in Pátzcuaro was only making hamburgers on Wednesday and Thursday nights, so no photos yet.

I'll go to the plaza here in town over the weekend and take a picture--assuming the vendor is vending hot dogs and not just hamburgers.

Hold that thought...

Esperanza

What's new at Mexico Cooks!?

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Hold that thought...

Esperanza

Esperanza, I love your name! I'm patiently holding, but do hurry! :laugh: There's beef bacon & some Hebrew Nationals in the fridge, I want to try it using them, please please please don't tell me that they need oink in them to duplicate what Chris Cognac is trying to achieve! :sad:

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Hold that thought...

Esperanza

Esperanza, I love your name! I'm patiently holding, but do hurry! :laugh: There's beef bacon & some Hebrew Nationals in the fridge, I want to try it using them, please please please don't tell me that they need oink in them to duplicate what Chris Cognac is trying to achieve! :sad:

yetty

Beef Bacon??

More please

woodburner

Edited by woodburner (log)
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all the while growing up in suburban Philly i ate these usually split(not in half)filled with american cheese and bacon wrapped,toothpicked and baked and we called them "Texas Tommy,s"when out of the oven you remove the toothpicks and place in one slice of white bread and just bring 2 corners together,of course the bacon was rarely "crisp" as i like it ,but very good nonetheless

Dave s

"Food is our common ground,a universal experience"

James Beard

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Beef Bacon??

More please

woodburner

Hey there, woodburner ---

It was such a revelation to me! It's Gwaltney Beef Bacon, cured and smoked beef plate, hickory smoke flavoring added, comes in a 12 oz. pack. I'm not up on what the good/popularl/preferred brands are these days, though.

What time is nightfall, Esperanza? :raz:

Edited by spaghetttti (log)

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Okay, gang, here they are as promised: Mexican hot dogs from a Mexican cart on the plaza in the town where I live.

I asked the vendor how she prepares the hot dog for cooking. It's sliced lengthwise about halfway through and slathered with mayonnaise. The slightly pre-cooked bacon is wrapped around it. The whole thing is then grilled on a flat top until the bacon is pretty crispy. The bun is opened and slapped with more mayonnaise and grilled till it's toasty brown. Then the vegetables are piled on--shredded cabbage, chopped onions, chopped tomatoes, jalapeños--and it's hit with some mustard and handed to you.

What I want to give you in the photo is the fragrance, the sublimely wafting hot dog/bacon sizzling essence. Scratch your monitor and sniff deeply. Ahhhh...so worth waiting for.

gallery_18522_58_1099801803.jpg

Edited by esperanza (log)

What's new at Mexico Cooks!?

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