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Why does copper cost so much?


Shalmanese
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Well... different people have different priorities.  I think you won't find too many owners of stainless lined heavy copper cookware who regret the purchase.

Give me all that I can afford, I got the starter fry pan and sauce pan (Falk) and have moved on to one piece a year as a present to myself. Nothing like it. :biggrin:

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Turns out I can afford copper. I just picked up a 2qt copper sauce pan and a copper and porcelin bain marie for just under $25. They are both tinned and in good shape. These are not the heavy all-clad type pans, but they are not el cheapo either. All peices are rivetted with brass hardware. Sometimes you just get lucky I guess.

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Turns out I can afford copper.  I just picked up a 2qt copper sauce pan and a copper and porcelin bain marie for just under $25.  They are both tinned and in good shape. These are not the heavy all-clad type pans, but they are not el cheapo either.  All peices are rivetted with brass hardware. Sometimes you just get lucky I guess.

That's why I'm always looking for tinned copper in second hand stores, flea markets, garage sales, ebay etc. You got a very good deal, and they should work well for you.

What I don't understand is the reference here, and many other threads on eg, for All-Clad?

What is it? Why is it coveted? How is it better than say, top grade Lagostina?

Just curious...

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Turns out I can afford copper.  I just picked up a 2qt copper sauce pan and a copper and porcelin bain marie for just under $25.  They are both tinned and in good shape. These are not the heavy all-clad type pans, but they are not el cheapo either.  All peices are rivetted with brass hardware. Sometimes you just get lucky I guess.

That's why I'm always looking for tinned copper in second hand stores, flea markets, garage sales, ebay etc. You got a very good deal, and they should work well for you.

What I don't understand is the reference here, and many other threads on eg, for All-Clad?

What is it? Why is it coveted? How is it better than say, top grade Lagostina?

Just curious...

All Clad was invented by the people who make the US mint clad coins. Stainless inside various metal combo's in the bottoms and side. Great marketing. I have it, I like it and I'm slowly changing to Falk. :wink:

Edited by winesonoma (log)

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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I just actually read about the All-Clad copper stuff. It says that it has an aluminum core. :blink: I don't get it. For heat transfer, aluminum is not as good as copper so why put in an aluminum core. That makes me think that the copper exterior is just for looks.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I just actually read about the All-Clad copper stuff. It says that it has an aluminum core. :blink:  I don't get it. For heat transfer, aluminum is not as good as copper so why put in an aluminum core. That makes me think that the copper exterior is just for looks.

Thanks, I didn't get a good look at the All Clad copper on Amazon.

/There are a lot of copper bottom saucepans appearing on the market now: Lagostina and manyof the dept. store brands. The Lagostina blurb says there is copper on the bottom, with a layer of aluminum, then a stainless steel finish.

This will allow the company to use a thin sheet of copper, augmented by a thicker and cheaper aluninum core. Not much thermal advantage here. But better, I suppose than the old Revere Ware scorchers!

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All Clad makes 2 different copper lines COP-R-CHEF and COPPER CORE. Price appears to be the same.

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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I guess that if I were to spend the money for copper (unlikely) I would want copper, with a ss lining of course.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I guess that if I were to spend the money for copper (unlikely) I would want copper, with a ss lining of course.

SS has a scorching or hot spot reputation. I wonder if copper and silver coating are still made, in Switzerland, at 'price doesn't matter' cost.

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I guess that if I were to spend the money for copper (unlikely) I would want copper, with a ss lining of course.

SS has a scorching or hot spot reputation. I wonder if copper and silver coating are still made, in Switzerland, at 'price doesn't matter' cost.

Not the ss with the copper. The ss is only about .008 inch thick. Falk is the greatest. :biggrin:

Edited by winesonoma (log)

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Much of cookware's pricing depends on marketing, not substance, so the going price of copper is largely irrelevant. Slkinsey's eGullet course on stovetop cookware does a thorough job of explaining what matters and what doesn't. Nonetheless, most customers of All-Clad, et al. will not have read this, and many of All-Clad et al.'s customers are making purchasing decisions based on what will impress their friends or boost their own self esteem rather than what will deliver the best long term performance. That's why copper costs so much.

As a practical matter, copper's extreme sensitivity to temperature changes is most important when you are focusing on French cuisine and its sauces. so you might not benefit as much from copper if most of your cooking draws from another tradition.

Slkinsey has the right approach. It is a matter of priorities. If you genuinely like to cook, you will spend a fair amount of your leisure time doing it. Like high quality knives, copper cookware adds to the pleasure quotient of this time in a way few other things can. The additional cost of copper is worth it, because you will spend so much time using the tool.

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Slkinsey has the right approach. It is a matter of priorities.  If you genuinely like to cook, you will spend a fair amount of your leisure time doing it.  Like high quality knives, copper cookware adds to the pleasure quotient of this time in a way few other things can.  The additional cost of copper is worth it, because you  will spend so much time using the tool.

Are you saying that I need some new toys??? Hmmmm???

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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