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Lever House


ellenesk
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  • 7 months later...
  • 4 months later...
Looking to go to lever house in Dec. with family and we're trying to decide if it's going to be a "great" experience...I have not read a lot of posts on it and looking if anyone can give me some help.

I don't know that I'd call it a "great experience" but I certainly found it a terrific place. The room is interesting, and looks period of the 1960's (but isn't, its new!), and the service was absolutely impeccable (for a large room with many covers). The wait staff was knowledgeable, engaging and friendly; the wine staff was unusually good. The food was very good, not outstanding. Its a fairly busy, somewhat crowded space. Very very solid mid-level dining experience. I enjoyed it very much and would go back in a heartbeat; but don't expect a Daniel experience...its very good but not a gastronomic restaurant.

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  • 6 months later...

I dined at Lever House last night with two colleagues. The modernist space is striking, with the abundance of hexagonal shapes almost letting you forget that the walls are a plain-Jane light brown. Tables are comfortable and impeccably set, but they are exceedingly close together, with waiters performing Olympic-class gymnastic manoevers to get to your table. The noise level is uncomfortably loud.

The cuisine is a mostly undistinguished New American. Roasted asparagus with duck egg and parmigiano reggiano ($17) sounded promising, but a puddle of fried egg somewhat overwhelmed the asparagus. I was pleased to find that Colorado rack of lamb ($38) came with two thick double-cut chops, which were lusciously tender. They came with a spicy lamb sausage that was the evening's highlight, along with a salad of parsley and mint that didn't wow me. Strawberry cheesecake for dessert ($12) brought the evening to a fitting close.

I enjoyed a cocktail called the Bourbon Smash, although it was over-priced at $15. I was annoyed when the server removed it before I was finished. He asked if I'd like some wine with dinner. I hadn't had time yet to peruse the list, so I entreated him to return in a few minutes. We never saw him again till dessert, so I drank water.

The bill for three was $200 including tax, before tip. That was for food only, as we drank no alcohol. (My cocktail was ordered at the bar.) At that price, you certainly expect the food to be good—which this was—I prefer quieter surroundings and more attentive service. I won't be rushing back.

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  • 9 months later...

I'd agree with Oak Apple. I had dinner there last week. Prices are very high. Food is OK, basically one star. We had the halibut (big piece), stripped bass, the soup of the day and a salad. It's very expense account. We noted most of the people eating there were men in suits....

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  • 1 month later...
I'd agree with Oak Apple.  I had dinner there last week.  Prices are very high.  Food is OK, basically one star.  We had the halibut (big piece), stripped bass, the soup of the day and a salad.  It's very expense account.  We noted most of the people eating there were men in suits....

Yeah, what's the deal with this place? (Not having been), the restaurant confounds me. It's 1 star Michelin, seems under-reported/discussed (on the forum and elsewhere), the prices seem very high ($140 for a five course tasting), and it's got the 1,000 bonus points on opentables for prime-times Saturday seating (yes, this Saturday - I just checked). I'm terribly intrigued, but very hesitant.

On a non-food note, I am fascinated by its futuristic bee-hive look.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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What's so surprising about an expensive, design-oriented restaurant, in a central business district, charging a lot of money for food that isn't bad but isn't that good?

Nothing, I guess, but for the fact that it got a Michelin star. That, I guess, is what I was trying to get at.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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So, basically what we're saying is that for an out-of-towner on a limited schedule who's looking for some "serious eating" shouldn''t necessarily put Lever House high on his list of priorities.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I doubt anyone here would say so.

Sorry, do you mean that nobody here would say (or admit?) that Lever House should or shouldn't warrant special attention?

Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Seems designed to cater to British travellers and expats.  Named after a London landmark... For somebody accustomed to London pricing, and earning pounds rather than dollars, it isn't so expensive...

Everytime I see it's name I think of the soap...

Sometimes after people eat there, they think the same thing.

Another prime example why Michelin should stick to manufacturing tires (and all other things rubber).

Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

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Another prime example why Michelin should stick to manufacturing tires (and all other things rubber).

It's worth noting that the Times gave it two stars, and without looking 'em all up, I think it received a number of other very favorable reviews. I wouldn't put it all on Michelin.
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Another prime example why Michelin should stick to manufacturing tires (and all other things rubber).

It's worth noting that the Times gave it two stars, and without looking 'em all up, I think it received a number of other very favorable reviews. I wouldn't put it all on Michelin.

Maybe management paid people off.

Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

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Another prime example why Michelin should stick to manufacturing tires (and all other things rubber).

It's worth noting that the Times gave it two stars, and without looking 'em all up, I think it received a number of other very favorable reviews. I wouldn't put it all on Michelin.

Maybe management paid people off.

rich, have you been to Lever House?

oakapple, I'd appreciate a link to the NYT review, I can't seem to find it on their site. Was it Bruni or Grimes?

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Another prime example why Michelin should stick to manufacturing tires (and all other things rubber).

It's worth noting that the Times gave it two stars, and without looking 'em all up, I think it received a number of other very favorable reviews. I wouldn't put it all on Michelin.

Maybe management paid people off.

rich, have you been to Lever House?

oakapple, I'd appreciate a link to the NYT review, I can't seem to find it on their site. Was it Bruni or Grimes?

Yes, I thought it was okay, but not making a effort to return.

Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

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It's across the street from Citi's headquarters and down the street from JP Morgan's headquarters and investment banking operations, UBS is also close by.......It's also close to several expensive hotels, like the Four Seasons. I suspect that helps support it----the concentation of better restauarants around Madison and 23rd has something to do with Credit Suisse's location, Morgan Stanley and Lehman are near places like Del Frisco's and Citi investment banking suppors Tribecca's more expensive dining.....

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