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Roger McShane

Restaurants and food stalls in Bangkok

144 posts in this topic

My dad and I had Peking duck at the Chinese restaurant at the Erawan/Grand Hyatt. It was much better than any Peking duck I've had in North America, and even better than that I've had in Hong Kong (which was much too fatty, and I like fatty duck!).

The thread is taking an interesting turn--Chinese food in Bangkok. I'm up for Peking duck--any other places you all like? Plus, where do you go for dim sum?

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The thread is taking an interesting turn--Chinese food in Bangkok.  I'm up for Peking duck--any other places you all like?  Plus, where do you go for dim sum?

There's a hotel in Chinatown...maybe it's Grand China Princess, but my memory could be off. It had the best Thai Chinese food I've had...probably the best "Chinese" I've had in Asia outside China.

A huge group of us...Thai/chaochiu friends, my visiting parents, other farang friends...went on the night of the Man U - Thai National team exhibition match in 2001. Place was absolutely deserted. Gotta say, an empty Bangkok chinatown is a wierd, wierd sight.

Jim


Edited by jrufusj (log)

Jim Jones

London, England

Never teach a pig to sing. It only wastes your time and frustrates the pig.

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Chinese food in Bangkok --- there is an excellent place on Soi Ngamduplee, off of Rama IV (across from Lumpini Night Market). Don't remember the name, just look for the Chinese characters. No atmosphere whatsoever but truly authentic homestyle cooking, mostly Sichuanese and northern. The jiaozi are fantastic.

Also Xian Restaurant, 10/3 Sukhumvit Soi 40. If you take the BTS get off at the Thonglo stop and exit the side of the street opposite Thonglo (Soi 55). Walk ahead and turn right at Soi 40. More Chinese spoken here than Thai. Some excellent dishes (in Thai) are muu sen phad phet (yuxiang rousi or "fish-taste" fried pork), yam taohuu sen (cool tofu threads tossed with chili oil), soup makhyya gap kai (tomato-egg soup) and the zhajiang mian. This place is not upscale, very reasonable price, and very yummy.

For congee and a few dim sum items there is a place on Silom, on the lefthand side of the street as you're heading away from Rama IV. It is on the second story of a shopping center, right above a McDonald's, maybe a 5 minute walk from Soi Convent. Unfortunately I don't know the name ... but the congee is very nice. Decor is sort of tacky/tatty upscale.

There is a Shanghai restaurant on Sukhumvit somewhere between Phrom Pong and Thonglo BTS Stations, on the even numbered soi side of the street. It may just be called Shanghai. Haven't eaten there but checked out the menu which was in Chinese (promising) and looked to have a good variety of Shanghai cold dishes.

J Lor (or is it J Ngor?) is a restaurant in the YMCA building on Sathorn, they also have a branch on Narathiwat. I have had excellent Cantonese-style seafood there, and stir-fried pea sprouts. But the dishes that stray from that sort of thing are just OK. It's pretty expensive.

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The thread is taking an interesting turn--Chinese food in Bangkok.  I'm up for Peking duck--any other places you all like?  Plus, where do you go for dim sum?

I don't really remember names of places because my dad just took me around and didn't tell me where we were going. The Chinese restaurant at the Ambassador hotel also had good Peking duck--carved at the table as good Peking duck should be (so my father used to say). There was also a place near Chatuchak (sp?) market that had amazing Peking pig--that's what I called it. A little piglet, butterflied, roasted, and eaten just like Peking duck. Mmmm.

Another place I loved is called the Joke Club. It's around the corner from the Ambassador Hotel. It's expensive (we spent B3000 for three people) but the seafood is very, very fresh and very, very good. Their mixed meats appetizer plate (barbeque pork, barbeque duck, roast chicken) was the best I've ever had, and their steamed fish with ginger and scallions was out of this world! I was told they make very good jook/congee but we concentrated on the seafood so we didn't try it. Plus we went for dinner...

I've never had dim sum in Bangkok, though, so I can't help you there!

Edited to add: I know this is about Roast duck and Chinese food, but might I also add a hearty recommendation for Dosa King for Indian food? Excellent dosa and malai kofta. I dream of it sometimes. And there was a Vietnamese place, too, but I can't remember the name right now.


Edited by prasantrin (log)

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Dosa King is good but for snacks only a small Indian cafe on Silom Soi Dtai (steps from the Hindu temple on the corner) is better. Everything is made by the granny in the kitchen, one at a time --- dosa, idli, and another large flattish pancake thing of fermented batter name of which I can't remember ... lovely chickpea curry and chutneys to go with. You may wait a while for your food and I can't say the service is super friendly, but one taste and it's worth it. Good sweets too.

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There was also a place near Chatuchak (sp?) market that had amazing Peking pig--that's what I called it. A little piglet, butterflied, roasted, and eaten just like Peking duck. Mmmm.

The first week we were in Bangkok back in 1964 my parents took us to the "Kinareenava" Floating Restaurant in Lumpini Park, where we had roast baby pig. My brother and I sneaked into the kitchen after dinner--picture lots of bamboo cages with squealing baby pigs on one side, a big pile of dead baby pigs in the middle, and roaring ovens on the other side. Needless to say, we were traumatized, but I still love that crispy skin!

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And an even better way is to take yourself, on your first day in Bangkok, to a market that has almost everything, like Dalat Aw Taw Kaw

Definitely a must do!

But, for someone not accustomed to Bangkok's heat and humidity, I always suggest a couple days acclimation before a trip to Aw Taw Kaw / Chatuchak.

Head there during the weekend to take full advatange of both.

MBK's 6th floor foodcourt, although not in contention with Aw Taw Kaw, is a good, air-conditioned introduction.

I haven't been since they've remodeled.

I, too, believe that the Nancy Chandler Bangkok Map is a must have.

I also recommend Bangkok Walking Tours, New Bus Map by Bangkok Guide.

The streets are more detailed and it includes bus routes.

They are both widely available in Bangkok.


For Bangkok eats, check out my Cheap Eats Bangkok

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I would recommend that you *not* combine a trip to Aw taw Kaw with a Chatuchak visit. Chatuchak is overwhelming, and extremely hot (esp this time of yr!) --- you'll be too sweaty and tired to enjoy Aw Taw Kaw. Get there by 10am, prepare to roam and observe before diving in to sample. And weekdays are best -- when the place is quieter, a bit less crowded and less frenetic. It's not hard to find ... any taxi driver in Bangkok will know "Dalat Aw Taw Kaw."

Khanom Chine in MBK center (first floor, near the Patumwan hotel) for khanom jeen --- an upscale, but spicy and authentic version. Few farang sample this dish when they are in Thailand, even though it's one of the best noodle dishes, IMO.

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We often hit both,...and I'm out of shape!

Although Aw Taw Kaw is of peticular interest here, Chatuchak is always mentioned as a "must visit" by most guidebooks.

I thought 2 trips up that way would be a bit much for a casual tourist.

This time of year is wet, but not extremely hot.

Just uploaded some cards from some of Bangkok's eateries and other businesses

Still working on more cards and some write ups.

Going on the road; might be a while.

Bangkok Recs

One of the restaurants, ROYYIM, is a place best visited with a local Thai host.

The clientele is down-home locals; it doesn't see many Westerners.


For Bangkok eats, check out my Cheap Eats Bangkok

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Sidewalk seafood in Bangkok, Siam area.

salty%20fish.jpg

tom%20yum.jpg

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Nice to see folks on this thread know the truth about Thai food: the very best is found in places you would wander past 99 times out of 100 and never think to step into. Sometimes really and truly amazing cooking comes out of these places. (brings tears to my eyes thinking of it). I can think of a simple Guaythiow noodle shop south of HadYai that was dark and dusty, and made the most inncredible bowl of noodles I have ever tasted, anywhere, for about 40 cents. wish i was ther now.....

try the Som Tam in the food court of Chatuchak market: reputed to be Thailands best.

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Sometimes really and truly amazing cooking comes out of these places. (brings tears to my eyes thinking of it).

Good, I'm not the only one who gets sad thinking about it. I miss Indo China more than any of my ex-girlfriends :)

The first meal I had in Bangkok was 'pork hocks simmered with intestine' (I don't know the Thai name) for breakfast and it was some of the best damm pork I've ever had. I tell my friends, "the huge pot of pork intestines was sitting out on the street in front of a hole in the wall filled with patio tables," and they say they would never go to this place. It's a shame lots of people pass up the good stuff and settle for the hotel.

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OK, guys...*exactly* where is Aw Taw Kaw? (Even its own website doesn't say.) Please try to be more specific than "across the street from Chatuchak" (which is so huge that "across the street" could be anywhere). I've looked on the most detailed maps of Bangkok that I could find (I haven't been able to locate my copy of Nancy Chandler's, however) but without success.

Thanks in advance.

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If everything went as planned, it will be across the street from the new subway station, the south end of Chatuchak, the direction from which the Skytrain comes.


Edited by Stupid_American (log)

For Bangkok eats, check out my Cheap Eats Bangkok

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To get there from the MoChit Skytrain stop, take the exit for the Weekend Market. You'll be walking south, on the right hand side of the road. You want to walk past the Weekend Market entrance, and keep walking until you hit an intersection with a streetlight. When I was there about 2 months ago, they were doing so construction work on that street (the one that runs perpendicular to the one that you've just come down).

Anyway, at that intersection, you want to cross over to the southern side of that intersection (ie, continue on in the direction you've been walking), and then turn right. This will put the Weekend Market on your right (but across a road). You want to walk down this street for a little while, and you'll see the market on your left. It's large, busy, covered, and there's a parking lot out in front of it. You can't miss it.

Hope that helps.

-------

Alex Parker

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Across from Chatuchak on Paholyothin Road. Just take the BTS to Mo Chit and get a taxi -- 35 baht and ANY taxi driver will know "Dalat Aw Taw Kaw". The Nancy Chandler map is available all over Bangkok --- try bookstores, Villa Supermarkets.

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I've just been told that the Kampaeng Phet subway station exits directly across from the market.

It's the stop after Chatuchack, on the subway line, heading from downtown.


For Bangkok eats, check out my Cheap Eats Bangkok

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Came across a site with some very good images of Bangkok street food.

Many pictures you see don't really capture the "atmosphere".

These are pretty stark.

I especially like the first photo, 5th row.

Besides showing a classic sidewalk restaurant, it also has the typical soi dog waiting for handouts!

I know some will be shocked at these photos and wonder how anyone can eat this way.

Personally, they make me anxious to get back!

In any case, I hope they help some adventurers to know what to expect.

This is street food

The little sign, shown twice in the series, says to keep things 60 cms above ground, one of the standards for a "green star" rating.

I don't recall having ever seen a green star!

If you navigate around the site a bit, you'll find plenty of more photos and information about Bangkok.

Unfortunately, the site creator seems to spend far too much time around Patpong!

Bangkok Food Pages


For Bangkok eats, check out my Cheap Eats Bangkok

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Sawadee krup - Greetings! Thank you, S_A, for posting that incredible link! I once got lost in Bangkok looking for Jim Thompson's (the Silk King) complex to view his house and buy some fabric. Along the way, all kinds of vendors lined the streets with some really fantastic (and some scary) offerings! The various khanom always took my breath away and I couldn't resist stopping to sample and indulge.

Apart from a horrendous and frightening experience in Pat Pong (that I still have nightmares about), I'd love to return to Thailand, to savor the street food of Bangkok and to venture to the other alluring sights & sites.

Thanks again. :smile:


Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Seeing these pictures of street food vendors reminds me of what Hong Kong used to be years ago. Hawkers selling food everywhere along the street. Those are mostly banned today. Now once-street-food is served in restaurants or small snack shops.

I saw some Bangkok street food and Hong Kong street food in common:

- grilled dried squids

- chestnuts roasted in black gravels

- small egg whaffles (shaped like chicken eggs)

- BBQ pork or beef or chicken in skewers


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

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