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Le Creuset


CtznCane
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I don't know if Le Creuset would honor its lifetime guarantee if we're talking about irregular pieces which might be an issue since that bump might get chipped off over time.

I don't know the answer to that specific question, but I will say that Le Creuset has the most wonderful customer service and will go the extra mile for their customers.

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I have never had to use Le Creuset customer service, and I have quite a few pieces.

I also have lots of Descoware and Copco enameled cast iron. In reality out of the 3 brands I prefer the Copco.

The Copco is thicker cast iron, and many of the pans have a raw cast iron bottom which makes for better conduction.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I just received a 4 qt Mario Batali oven for Christmas and gave it a try last night. While letting and Turkey and Buternut Squash soup simmer I put the lid on and within a few mins noticed a significant amount of steam escaping from the edges. Did I have the heat up to high, or is it not such a great brand? Anyone have experience. Soup was way satisfying though.

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My bad. I meant to refer to other enameled cast iron on the market, and why Le Creuset is so much more expensive than those other brands? For the same size enameled cast iron dutch oven from a company like Lodge or Tramontina, it'll cost something like $50 when Le Creuset will charge almost $300. With something like All-Clad, at least I can understand where the extra costs are coming in because its cladded all the way up the sides. But, is there something fundamental about Le Creuset that makes it better and thus more expensive? Or, is the extra cost not necessarily related to improved quality? If I bought Le Creuset, is that extra cost only go into subsidizing the out-of-control employee practices in France so some Le Creuset employee can dawdle on hours-long breaks to sip vin? ;)

I'm surprised that nobody has any input on this. I've been very happy with my two Lodge enameled dutch ovens for over a year. I have only limited experience with comparable Le Creuset models that I've used in other kitchens, so I don't feel comfortable making any detailed comparison.

I just checked on Amazon, and a 3 qt Lodge runs around $40 while a 3.5 qt Le Creuset will set you back a whopping $175. That's a huge cost difference for potentially similar items. It would seem important then to identify actual differences between Le Creuset and other manufacturers, especially because so many people on this thread have intimated that they have had to stretch their budgets to acquire these items.

Cost-benefit analyses come up often in this part of the eG forums and are inherently subjective. A Vitamix blender costs much more than department store models but is clearly designed and built to different specifications; likewise a knife made from high-end Japanese steel versus the conventional French/German offerings. Every consumer will have to decide whether the difference in performance justifies the additional cost. In these two examples, we have specific information about what makes a low-cost product different from its high-cost brethren. As far as I know, this is not the case with enameled cast-iron pots. So, what are the tangible differences, if any? Otherwise, the amount saved by going with Lodge over Le Creuset could be put to better uses if it buys one nothing but a name.

 

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My bad. I meant to refer to other enameled cast iron on the market, and why Le Creuset is so much more expensive than those other brands? For the same size enameled cast iron dutch oven from a company like Lodge or Tramontina, it'll cost something like $50 when Le Creuset will charge almost $300. With something like All-Clad, at least I can understand where the extra costs are coming in because its cladded all the way up the sides. But, is there something fundamental about Le Creuset that makes it better and thus more expensive? Or, is the extra cost not necessarily related to improved quality? If I bought Le Creuset, is that extra cost only go into subsidizing the out-of-control employee practices in France so some Le Creuset employee can dawdle on hours-long breaks to sip vin? ;)

I'm surprised that nobody has any input on this. I've been very happy with my two Lodge enameled dutch ovens for over a year. I have only limited experience with comparable Le Creuset models that I've used in other kitchens, so I don't feel comfortable making any detailed comparison.

I just checked on Amazon, and a 3 qt Lodge runs around $40 while a 3.5 qt Le Creuset will set you back a whopping $175. That's a huge cost difference for potentially similar items. It would seem important then to identify actual differences between Le Creuset and other manufacturers, especially because so many people on this thread have intimated that they have had to stretch their budgets to acquire these items.

Cost-benefit analyses come up often in this part of the eG forums and are inherently subjective. A Vitamix blender costs much more than department store models but is clearly designed and built to different specifications; likewise a knife made from high-end Japanese steel versus the conventional French/German offerings. Every consumer will have to decide whether the difference in performance justifies the additional cost. In these two examples, we have specific information about what makes a low-cost product different from its high-cost brethren. As far as I know, this is not the case with enameled cast-iron pots. So, what are the tangible differences, if any? Otherwise, the amount saved by going with Lodge over Le Creuset could be put to better uses if it buys one nothing but a name.

The main difference I have noticed between the French Le Creuset and the ones made in China for the US import market as Lodge, Batali, etc. is that the enamel on the Chinese ones appear softer and it nicks and dents more easily...and the iron work appears a little cruder. I have noticed this in examining them in stores, but have not cooked with them. They may not have the life span of the Le Creuset, but they should function similarly.

I have quite a bit of US made Lodge raw cast iron and French made Le Creuset and Staub enameled cast iron and like them all a lot. Others here over the last few years have reported good results with the inexpensive Chinese versions. If I were in the market for Dutch/French Ovens today, I still probably would prefer something French, but would actually buy the inexpensive ones if I could not find a good deal on Amazon, at a Le Creuset factory outlet, TJMaxx, Marshall's, garage/estate sale, or at a Winter sale at Williams-Sonoma or Sur La Table.

That said, with fuel costs coming down, there may be some better prices ahead for European products this year.

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  • 1 month later...

gallery_52796_6455_10397.jpg

I bought this little Le Creuset beauty at TJ Maxx for $129 bucks. 12" across. 3¾" from bottom to top edge of pot, not including lid.

Is it a braiser? A dutch oven? It says 30 cm on the lid and bottom, but I can't see anything in the current line up that fits colour, shape, and size.

It's currently got the Obama Family Chili Recipe bubbling away in it. :biggrin:

Edited by pax (log)
“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”
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gallery_52796_6455_10397.jpg

I bought this little Le Creuset beauty at TJ Maxx for $129 bucks. 12" across. 3¾" from bottom to top edge of pot, not including lid.

Is it a braiser? A dutch oven? It says 30 cm on the lid and bottom, but I can't see anything in the current line up that fits colour, shape, and size.

It's currently got the Obama Family Chili Recipe bubbling away in it.  :biggrin:

Perhaps this?

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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gallery_52796_6455_10397.jpg

I bought this little Le Creuset beauty at TJ Maxx for $129 bucks. 12" across. 3¾" from bottom to top edge of pot, not including lid.

Is it a braiser? A dutch oven? It says 30 cm on the lid and bottom, but I can't see anything in the current line up that fits colour, shape, and size.

It's currently got the Obama Family Chili Recipe bubbling away in it.   :biggrin:

It's the WIDE Dutch oven

I think the color is "Citron" or is marketed by Williams-Sonoma as "Lemongrass".

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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My bad. I meant to refer to other enameled cast iron on the market, and why Le Creuset is so much more expensive than those other brands? For the same size enameled cast iron dutch oven from a company like Lodge or Tramontina, it'll cost something like $50 when Le Creuset will charge almost $300. With something like All-Clad, at least I can understand where the extra costs are coming in because its cladded all the way up the sides. But, is there something fundamental about Le Creuset that makes it better and thus more expensive? Or, is the extra cost not necessarily related to improved quality? If I bought Le Creuset, is that extra cost only go into subsidizing the out-of-control employee practices in France so some Le Creuset employee can dawdle on hours-long breaks to sip vin? ;)

I'm surprised that nobody has any input on this. I've been very happy with my two Lodge enameled dutch ovens for over a year. I have only limited experience with comparable Le Creuset models that I've used in other kitchens, so I don't feel comfortable making any detailed comparison.

I just checked on Amazon, and a 3 qt Lodge runs around $40 while a 3.5 qt Le Creuset will set you back a whopping $175. That's a huge cost difference for potentially similar items. It would seem important then to identify actual differences between Le Creuset and other manufacturers, especially because so many people on this thread have intimated that they have had to stretch their budgets to acquire these items.

Cost-benefit analyses come up often in this part of the eG forums and are inherently subjective. A Vitamix blender costs much more than department store models but is clearly designed and built to different specifications; likewise a knife made from high-end Japanese steel versus the conventional French/German offerings. Every consumer will have to decide whether the difference in performance justifies the additional cost. In these two examples, we have specific information about what makes a low-cost product different from its high-cost brethren. As far as I know, this is not the case with enameled cast-iron pots. So, what are the tangible differences, if any? Otherwise, the amount saved by going with Lodge over Le Creuset could be put to better uses if it buys one nothing but a name.

The first piece of enameled cast iron I bought was the dutch oven recommended by Cooks Illustrated as a best buy from Target. It was good but almost immediately the enamel started chipping off the handles.

I then bought a Le Creuset second from Marshall's and haven't had any problems with chipping.

I gave the Target dutch oven to Goodwill and started acquiring LC. Some of my pieces are thrift store finds and have years of use in them and none have chips or missing enamel.

You might save more up front buying a cheaper brand but if you have to replace it every few years then the savings disappear. LC has a hundred year warranty so if anything goes wrong return it and get a new one for the cost of shipping.

Chad

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I've recently seen the latest Le Creuset pots with the lid converted so that now it holds ice.  It would seem like the ice would melt immediately and not do much.  Do you think the new pot is worthwhile?

Hi, you can find an entire discussion about the Le Creuset "Doufeu" here.

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 11 months later...

Posts here seem to indicate that Le Creuset has excellent customer service and is extremely helpful with replacements, even when damage is caused by use.

Last year I dropped and broke the lid on my 30yo LC Dutch oven. I called LC and asked for a replacement lid and was told that A) they no longer made that size Dutch oven and B) they don't sell lids separately. However, they did offer to ship me a brand new, complete Dutch oven for only 25% of the selling price. Quite fair, I thought. So, it cost me a few bucks but I got a brand new, slightly larger, pot delivered right to my door.

Today I bought a new pot, in Black Onyx. I was looking for a less expensive model but realized how pleased I was with LC and the company's service, that reviews are almost universally 100% positive, and that many lesser expensive model reviews often mention problems: cracks, chips, lids that don't fight just right, staining, etc. Why look for problems and aggavation?

 ... Shel


 

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. . . they did offer to ship me a brand new, complete Dutch oven for only 25% of the selling price. Quite fair, I thought. So, it cost me a few bucks but I got a brand new, slightly larger, pot delivered right to my door.

Holy crap. More than fair, I'd say.

Today I bought a new pot, in Black Onyx. I was looking for a less expensive model but realized how pleased I was with LC and the company's service, that reviews are almost universally 100% positive, and that many lesser expensive model reviews often mention problems: cracks, chips, lids that don't fight just right, staining, etc. Why look for problems and aggavation?

The sound you hear is that of a chicken coming home to roost.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Here's a link to LeCreuset's site (USA) where you can select your state and search for a factory store. near you.

--Dave M.--

While poking around the site I came across a Le Creuset "Signature" store. Anybody know what that is and how it may be different from the factory outlet? Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

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Here's a link for caring and use of LeCreuset enamled cast iron cookware.

--Dave M.--

LC mentions that their enameled cast iron pots are dishwasher safe, although they recommend hand washing. FWIW, my first LC pot went into the dishwasher quite a few times during its life, and now, 30 years later, it's still as good as new. I would not recommend the dishwasher on a constant, regular basis, but it sure seems that every now and then a trip through the machine won't hurt anything.

 ... Shel


 

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Yesterday I picked up my new LC, the 5 1/2 quart French oven in Black Onyx :wub: What a nice looking piece. It has an almond interior which was something of a surprise as I was expecting white. The almond looks good with the black exterior and is still light enough to be able to see food brown and see any stuck on bits. But the biggest surprise is that the pot came with the stainless steel knob on the lid instead of the expected phenolic one. Has LC changed to SS or did I somehow get lucky?

Can't wait to clean it up and start using it. There are a few dishes I want to try real soon.

 ... Shel


 

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Black is the only color of that comes with stainless steel knobs for the lids, but you can buy the stainless knobs separately and replace the original ones on any colors and sizes.

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Black is the only color of that comes with stainless steel knobs for the lids [...]

I didn't know that black came standard with the SS knobs. Nice to know ... Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

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...

LC mentions that their enameled cast iron pots are dishwasher safe, although they recommend hand washing. FWIW, my first LC pot went into the dishwasher quite a few times during its life, and now, 30 years later, it's still as good as new. I would not recommend the dishwasher on a constant, regular basis, but it sure seems that every now and then a trip through the machine won't hurt anything.

The thing most likely to suffer is that plastic knob, or any plastic handles.

Wood tends to look less good after dishwashing, should you have any knobs or handles in that material.

But, if the piece is secured, it shouldn't hurt the cast iron.

Regarding routine cleaning the inside of the stuff - keep the shine !

Don't use ANYTHING abrasive to clean it - you'll just make it more 'sticky' for next time.

I like Le Creuset's own brand cleaner.

Its called "Pots and Pans" in the UK and "Cookware Cleaner" in the US.

It might seem expensive, but you use so little that it is hardly an extravagance.

There is a VERY mild scouring powder (talc?), as well as detergent and polish in the formulation.

It helps to maintain the shine, but it won't undo the damage caused by brillo pads or even scotchbrite.

I use the stuff on a tri-ply stainless pan too. Works equally well.

Given the cost of this cookware in the US (its almost but not quite as expensive here), I think it's very important to look after it carefully. And that includes washing it carefully.

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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Did anybody try the Faitout Plume? It's 30% lighter because of a steel lid.

In France the price is much lower, 89 € instead of 119 € of a regular same size LC (20 cm).

Any thought?

Thanks

Edited by Franci (log)
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