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Le Creuset


CtznCane
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Ok, I broke in my new 7 1/2 round LC .

Snowangel, I did exactly what you said. You didn't mention what to do with the rest of the wine so I drank it. It was excellent too.

I cannot believe I've lived to this age and had never owned an LC .

I feel like an idiot. And I thought I knew how to cook.

NOW, I know how to cook.

That LC gave me what I always knew it should be.

If you have never had one, get one. Period. :wub::wub::wub::wub:

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Snowangel, I did exactly what you said. You didn't mention what to do with the rest of the wine so I drank it.  It was excellent too.

That's exactly what you are supposed to do with the rest of the wine.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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  • 3 weeks later...

less than 2 weeks ago, I reluctantly boxed off my green lc buffet cassarole to ship off because the enamel was popping off. I loved that pan, I used it 3-4 times a week. It's the perfect size for etouffee', and jambalaya, and sauted shrimp for pasta, and creoles and the list goes on. After contacting lc of n. America, I called and got a return number for my baby. I was told they discontinued the color (of course) and I chose buff in case they replaced it. I needed something neutral to go with my hodgpodge of lc colors....

If they determined neglect was the cause, there would be no replacement, but a 75% discount for a new pot.

I got the replacement pot today.

What a great warranty.

What a great turnaround time.

What a great pot!!!!!

I love my lc.

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I was doing some food shopping over at Costco tonight and I saw the price of a Le Creuset 4 1/2 qt. round French oven (in bleu) drop down in price from $130 to $109. I bought it. Was that a good price?

What should I cook in it first? Beef bourgignon? Roast? Can I do deep frying in that?

Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

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Has anyone else bought any of the Mario Batali line of cast iron pots? I was in the market recently for a new roasting pan. After doing a little homework and finding some good reviews, I bought Batali's roaster and the Dutch Oven. I've used them both a number of times now and I'm very happy with them. One of the deciding factors was that these are safe in the oven at 500°F. They are very heavy. The roasting pan weights just under 12 pounds.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Has anyone else bought any of the Mario Batali line of cast iron pots?

61369675-S.jpg

First I owe this Forum big time. As a result of registering on the Forum, braising has entered my life!

Yes, I have also purchased a Mario Batali cast iron Dutch oven. I drooled over the Le Cruesets and if I ever received one as a gift I would love that giver forever...but I come from a depression era family where you find ways to meet your objectives in a very cost effective manner. After looking at Target and seeing the enamel chips on all the shelf items, I felt that wasn't "good enough." Someone on the list mentioned the MB line. I got mine from Amazon for $62.99, free shipping, no tax. And the color of red-orange looks great on my stove. Put a big smile on my face.

Next I got the book recommended, "All About Braising" out of the library. After one pass through I knew I had to own it...so I got it from half.com for $9.99...brand new. (I do the search first through www.addall.com where they compare prices including shipping for all booksellers.)

I have prepared the Coq au vin, the zinfandel pot roast, and a whole chicken adapted from a Lidia recipe. Unbelievably delicious...all of them. The pot works wonderfully. It has the little braising spikes in the lid so I do not follow the recipe suggestion for using parchment paper as a sealer between the lid and the food. It retains the moisture just great. Also, there is no issue with clean up...I just soak it a while in warm water and it cleans like a charm.

And yes, I also know what to do with the left over wine.

Cooking is like love, it should be entered into with abandon, or not at all.

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I was doing some food shopping over at Costco tonight and I saw the price of a Le Creuset 4 1/2 qt. round French oven (in bleu) drop down in price from $130 to $109. I bought it. Was that a good price?

What should I cook in it first? Beef bourgignon? Roast? Can I do deep frying in that?

Missed this when you first posted. Yes, you can deep fry in a LC. Actually works quite well because the pot holds so much heat.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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  • 2 weeks later...

Needless to say, I love my LC pieces! I've found some wonderful bargains on ebay, and on occasion at the LC outlet. I've heard good things about Staub also. Mario's are very good looking!

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I love my Batali dutch oven. I recieved a smaller LC peice for my wedding (not what we registered for and not large enough for what I wanted to use it for), I exchanged it for the Batali dutch oven, a knife sharpener, some kitchen utensels, and I still have 20 dollars on a gift card. Honestly, with LC you are paying a huge price for that name. I cannot imagine that a LC dutch oven is $100 better than Batali's.

Explore the food, beverages, and people of Wisconsin EatWisconsin.com

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I love my Batali dutch oven.  I recieved a smaller LC peice for my wedding (not what we registered for and not large enough for what I wanted to use it for), I exchanged it for the Batali dutch oven, a knife sharpener, some kitchen utensels, and I still have 20 dollars on a gift card. Honestly, with LC you are paying a huge price for that name.  I cannot imagine that a LC dutch oven is $100 better than Batali's.

I haven't seen Batali in my area yet, but if I am correct in guessing that is made in China, that will explain the price difference from Le Creuset or Staub. Most European and North American plants have invested heavily in high tech operations and have managed to cut back on personnel while maintaining prices and (hopefully) market share. There is no need for an expensive operation in China, because an easily trained, highly skilled labour force is available (and I do mean highly skilled!), at low cost. Currency rates and low shipping helps too.

It won't be long before LC is an unaffordable luxury item.

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I suppose I could've started a new thread for this, but according to a recent article in the New York Times:

[...] There were eight pans in the test, most of them 12 inches in diameter: All-Clad with an aluminum core, All-Clad with a copper core, Bourgeat copper; De Buyer carbon steel; Calphalon anodized aluminum; seasoned and unseasoned Lodge cast iron and Le Creuset enameled cast iron.

[...] After all the tests, there was one pan I fell for: Le Creuset. It is easy to clean, and because of its enamel finish, acidic foods can be cooked without changes to color or taste. The cast iron pans were a very close second.

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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My mom stopped at the LC outlet store yesterday to get a 2.5 quart dutch oven. White and black were on sale, and she found out that if she spent over $100, there would be an addition 20% off. So, she got this pan for me ($68.00 before the additional 20% off!). Gotta love my mom -- my cookware fairy!

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Do I do anything to this pan other than washing it before I use it? Enameled interior, 11-3/4 inches.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Does anyone have a Le Creuset wok? Is it even a good idea?

The wok is one of the few pieces I don't have....Because it would be so heavy I imagine it would be hard to 'stir' ingredients by tossing the pan.

btw, there are some good deals on amazon right now.

61.80 for 3 1/2 quart saucepan

white saucier pan 63.60

I have found cast iron woks in Chinatown, usually in the big all-purpose stores, for $15-$20.

I didn't buy, but I don't think they were too heavy for tossing. The LC would be heavier with the enamel coating.

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Does anyone have a Le Creuset wok? Is it even a good idea?

The wok is one of the few pieces I don't have....Because it would be so heavy I imagine it would be hard to 'stir' ingredients by tossing the pan.

btw, there are some good deals on amazon right now.

61.80 for 3 1/2 quart saucepan

white saucier pan 63.60

I have found cast iron woks in Chinatown, usually in the big all-purpose stores, for $15-$20.

I didn't buy, but I don't think they were too heavy for tossing. The LC would be heavier with the enamel coating.

I wouldn't recommend an LC wok. We bought a cast iron wok from The Wok Shop last year in SF and it's one of the best kitchen purchases I've made. Light-weight, but it gets extremely hot. After it's seasoned, it's very easy to clean (you never use soap on it).

I exchanged my LC 4.5 qt. for a cream Batali pot. I really like it, although I haven't used it that much so far. It definitely feels as heavy as the LC, with the same quality, although I suppose only time will tell. On a smaller note, I really like the knob better than the plastic one on LC.

I always deep fry doughnuts in my 3.5 qt. LC. Like another poster said, it does retain heat very well.

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Snowangel, beautiful pan! I have one in red, but haven't used it yet. I do have the wok though that has the same interior. You can either let a seasoning build up, or wipe the inside of the pan with oil and heat it until it stops smoking. Oil again and repeat until you have a shiny black surface. I used olive oil. It does take a seasoning just like raw iron as the enamel is still porous and has some roughness to it. It will be almost nonstick after.

My mom stopped at the LC outlet store yesterday to get a 2.5 quart dutch oven.  White and black were on sale, and she found out that if she spent over $100, there would be an addition 20% off.  So, she got this pan for me ($68.00 before the additional 20% off!).  Gotta love my mom -- my cookware fairy!

gallery_6263_35_70769.jpg

Do I do anything to this pan other than washing it before I use it?  Enameled interior, 11-3/4 inches.

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So last November I treated myself to my first Le Creuset -- a 6 3/4 qt. oval French oven. I love it! This week I made short ribs for the first time ever and they were fantastic and it was so easy.

Now my birthday is coming up and my mother-in-law has been asking me what I want. So why not another Le Creuset?

But I'm not sure what size I should get next. I was thinking maybe a round piece this time, but not set on that. Should I get round in 3 1/2 qt., 4 1/2 qt. or 5 1/2 qt? Or should I get another oval piece -- 3 1/2 qt. or 5 qt.?

On one hand, I don't want to get something too small, but at the same time, I certainly don't want something too close to the 6 3/4 qt. oval one that I already have. Or should I go in the other direction and get something bigger? I'm just afraid that the bigger pieces would only come out once or twice a year for holidays.

Any suggestions? Thanks!

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So last November I treated myself to my first Le Creuset -- a 6 3/4 qt. oval French oven.  I love it!  This week I made short ribs for the first time ever and they were fantastic and it was so easy.

Now my birthday is coming up and my mother-in-law has been asking me what I want.  So why not another Le Creuset?

But I'm not sure what size I should get next.  I was thinking maybe a round piece this time, but not set on that.  Should I get round in 3 1/2 qt., 4 1/2 qt. or 5 1/2 qt?  Or should I get another oval piece -- 3 1/2 qt. or 5 qt.?

On one hand, I don't want to get something too small, but at the same time, I certainly don't want something too close to the 6 3/4 qt. oval one that I already have.  Or should I go in the other direction and get something bigger?  I'm just afraid that the bigger pieces would only come out once or twice a year for holidays.

Any suggestions?  Thanks!

Think about what it is you would want to cook in a second LC - particularly the kinds of things you would cook often (so it doesn't just come out for the high days and holidays) - then figure out, perhaps looking at other pots and pan you have of various sizes, which would be best for such purposes.

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

Virginia Woolf

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I like supplementing the big oval with a 2 5/8 quart soup pot - perfect size for a pound of beans, a batch of soup, you name it. Then you might think about a gratin - now that I have one, I make gratins - never did before.

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So last November I treated myself to my first Le Creuset -- a 6 3/4 qt. oval French oven.  I love it!  This week I made short ribs for the first time ever and they were fantastic and it was so easy.

Now my birthday is coming up and my mother-in-law has been asking me what I want.  So why not another Le Creuset?

But I'm not sure what size I should get next.  I was thinking maybe a round piece this time, but not set on that.  Should I get round in 3 1/2 qt., 4 1/2 qt. or 5 1/2 qt?  Or should I get another oval piece -- 3 1/2 qt. or 5 qt.?

On one hand, I don't want to get something too small, but at the same time, I certainly don't want something too close to the 6 3/4 qt. oval one that I already have.  Or should I go in the other direction and get something bigger?  I'm just afraid that the bigger pieces would only come out once or twice a year for holidays.

Any suggestions?  Thanks!

How about a buffet casserole? I use mine more than any of my other Le Creuset pieces.

Le Creuset Buffet Casserole

On a related note, I purchased a Le Creuset kettle 6 weeks ago. I have treated with the usual care, making sure to empty it between uses. I just noticed a rusted chip by the spout, and another on the bottom. Has anyone had similar problems? It appears that the enamel on steel does not have the same warranty as the cast iron.

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On a related note, I purchased a Le Creuset kettle 6 weeks ago. I have treated with the usual care, making sure to empty it between uses. I just noticed a rusted chip by the spout, and another on the bottom. Has anyone had similar problems? It appears that the enamel on steel does not have the same warranty as the cast iron.

I had this happen, too, though after several months. Just take it back to the retailer you bought it from and get something else.

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I was actually considering the buffet casserole.  But I wasn't sure what I would use it for...any suggestions?

I have found it ideal for dishes where you need to sear the protein, then simmer it in a sauce.

I also use it for regular (shallow) frying, especially for fish or other food with a strong smell. It is hard to get the smell out of my uncoated cast iron skillet, and I have found this to be a great alternative.

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