Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Egg Rolls, Spring Rolls, Fried Dumplings


Jason Perlow
 Share

Recommended Posts

Thanks for the great suggestions, everybody!

Yes, I am puzzled why the recipe did not have a binding agent like egg or ground pork - I deduced that has been the problem with my potstickers being too fluffy.

I didn't realize that the mushrooms had to soak so long. I actually didn't boil them, only put them in the water once it came to a boil and took off the heat, so guess it wasn't long enough. And next time I will use the soaking water! Waste not, want not. :wink:

Last night I went out and got some new wrappers (I didn't buy the real thin ones at the advice of the guy at the market) and some ground pork. I think I may have a better result next time due to all the excellent advice here. :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cornstarch is another binding agent.

This is probably a no-no, but one time I forgot to soak my dried mushrooms, and needed them ASAP ----so, I nuked them in water to cover and in les than five minutes they were ready. I didn't detect ny loss of flavor, but then I don't have the most acute palate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cornstarch is another binding agent.

This is probably a no-no, but one time I forgot to soak my dried mushrooms, and needed them ASAP ----so, I nuked them in water to cover and in les than five minutes they were ready.  I didn't detect ny loss of flavor, but then I don't have the most acute palate.

Quite acceptable practice when you're in a hurry or having senior moments like I do. :wink:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have always preferred to demur from giving out recipes, for many, many reasons, but the main one is that I cook by taste and procedure. It is difficult to impart the nuances of procedure to someone by words alone and nigh on impossible with regards to taste.

Sequim's problems with recipes IS the problem with recipes. In my experience a lot of recipes are not complete; in procedure, ingredients, proportions, cooking times, etc., etc. A lot of recipes are written too simply or worse, with the assumption that the reader has a certain level of expertise. Sequim did right in asking advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You SQUEEZE :biggrin:

What we used to do in our commercial process, and the restaurant too, was to squeeze as much of the moisture out of the veg. matter as humanly possible. All vegetables-Chinese cabbage, beansprouts, mushroom, etc. have to be blanched well, to make the water extraction easier. Keep liquid flavourings like soy or oyster sauces to an absolute minimum. The filling should be semi-dry to the feel, not like yours pictured. Oh, in the commercial process because of the need for a longer shelf life, the meat is also pre-cooked :wink: .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We used to make 24" wokfuls of egg roll filling every evening. It was my son's job to keep turning the vegetables as they cook, and tilting the wok in such a way as to be able to ladle off the liquid as it accumulated. This took at least a half hour. We didn't have to squeeze the mixture. When he feels that it is "dry" enough, he will mix in a cornstarch heavy slurry into the vegetables. This he had to keep tossing and turning quickly and continuously to make sure it mixes and cooks properly. I was glad he worked out at the gym daily! The mixture was all at the same time dry, juicy, gooey, and very heavy. We'd spread this mixture in big deep pans, cool and refridgerated until the next morning. By this time, you can form egg-shapes that will hold its form.

My egg roll girl would lay out the wrappers in rows of 6 sheets x6. The "eggs" would be placed in the middle of each sheet . A pass with the pastry brush dipped in egg white on three sides, then each egg roll completed. A wokful would make about 150 egg rolls.

At home, I follow pretty much the same proceedure...in a much smaller wok! My filling consists of shredded cabbage, celery, onion, mushrooms and some shredded meat if I want. I don't make these too often. Most of the time, I make the smaller spring rolls...easier. :wink:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In both our fresh and frozen/reheated egg rolls (see photolog above), the filling is just too wet. Any advice on getting a filling more like in a restaurant egg roll?

In the first filling with cabbage, did you pre-salt the greens, let them sit, and then squeeze out all of the liquid? And, when I use the bean thread noodles in egg rolls, I slightly "undercook" them.

I also keep liquid seasons to a minimum. If using soy, use the dark/thick soy. I compensate by upping the "dry" seasonings.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...