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Aussie Chefs' Cookbooks


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The Est Est Est cookbook sold for $185.

Second hand seems a bad choice.

You can get it new from Angus and Robertson.

They have it for $54.95 Australian plus postage.

http://search.angusrobertson.com.au/search...Search&booksby=

Might be worth buying a few and putting them on Amazon for what appears to be an obscene profit.

Of course I may get an email back from my order saying it's unavailable. :biggrin:

Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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Thanks for that tip nickrey! I've placed an order, so we'll see what happens.

Anyway, I saw the new Christine Manfield cookbook. It's called "Fire" and it covers her travels around the world. The book is about 600 pages long, it comes in a big red box, and flicking through it, it looks to be as good (stuff that, BETTER) than her many other books.

The thing has a RRP of $100, but you can get it for $80 at Readings and $70 at Borders.

I'll be getting a copy soon.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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  • 3 weeks later...

David Veart has just released a history of New Zealand cooking called First, Catch Your Weka: A Story of New Zealand Cooking (University of Auckland Press, Auckland, 15 September 2008). It is a semi-scholarly look at history of NZ's cuisine from the field of anthropology. The primary source of the study is cookbooks published in NZ over the ages as being reflective of NZ cuisine's changes.

Despite the drab sounding and being published by an obviously academic printing press, it is quite light-hearted and contains a few recipes of cookbooks of years ago, as well as a run through of current NZ cookbooks. Of particular interests to readers from across the Tasman is the fact culinary personnels, practices, ideas, and publications have always flowed freely between the two sides of the Tasman right from the beginning, despite NZ at times being more conservative and more loyal to the British cuisine after Australia has abandoned them altogether.

IMHO this is the most up to date book available on the subject of NZ cuisine. Many other articles are either tourist fluffs, or are written as if time stood still at 1979. It is quite interesting to know that the modern day NZ cuisine is basically a lot of Mediterranean takes, modified Asian dishes, modified British old favourites, and traditional baking recipes, in fact not too unsimilar to Australian food these days.

Edited by johung (log)
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The New Zealand Woman's Weekly has published the latest New Zealand Woman's Weekly Cookbook edited by Julie Le Clerc (Auckland, Penguin Books, 29 September 2008). Basically it is a compandium of recipes published since Le Clerc became the editor of the food section in 2006.

Organized into seasons and incorporating a few foreign ingredients, it is Pacific Rim cooking and very decent. Haven't bought it yet, but I find them to be very contemporary in feel.

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Peter Gawron has released Saffron: Food from the Central Otago Heartland (Auckland, Godwit, 3 October 2008). Originally from South Australia and subsequently trained in Sydney, Gawron and his wife now run the renowned Saffron restaurant in Arrowtown (within the Queenstown-Arrowtown tourist region).

It is touted as the first regional cookbook published in New Zealand. The food is extremely seasonal due to the very different climates between summer (searing hot) to winter (bitterly cold). Many recipes are prepared with local ingredients Gawron harvests by hand in season (including crab apples and stone fruit borne of trees dating back to the 19th century gold mining days, snow berries, different wild mushroom, wild raspberries and gooseberries, game birds from Bendigo Station, alpine honey from Halfway Bay Station and others).

In a sense it is very similar to Steven Snow's Byron: Cooking and Eating (Sydney, Murdoch Books, 29 August 2008) which also showcases seasonal ingredients in preparation of Pacific Rim dishes.

Edited by johung (log)
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Neil Perry's new cookbook is out. IT's called "Balance and Harmony", it covers Asian cooking, and the RRP is $120. Readings has it on special at $100. I didn't get to look inside it as it's in a box and shrink wrapped.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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Neil Perry's new cookbook is out.  IT's called "Balance and Harmony", it covers Asian cooking, and the RRP is $120.  Readings has it on special at $100.  I didn't get to look inside it as it's in a box and shrink wrapped.

I saw this at Borders and it is a whopping NZ$165. Searched through amazon.co.uk and Perry's own official website and it seems what we have just seen is a "limited edition" of the first print. The "normal" edition is hardcover and is selling at GBP30.00 RRP in Britain - identical to his previous work Good Food.

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I ordered my copy of the new Neil Perry book from Amazon.co.uk, and they were charging GBP15.00. I've now seen the book itself, and it looks to be a fabulous book. But it'd be interesting to know what the RRP would be for an edition without the presentation box. The cheapest local Australian price I've seen it is $85 at Target.

btw, Books for Cooks has the Alinea book in stock, and at $65.00, it's a bargain at that price.

Edited by Shinboners (log)
Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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  • 4 weeks later...

Was browsing the 'Beautiful Cookbook' series on Amazon as I quite enjoy the two that I have and was surprised to find 'Australia the Beautiful Cookbook'!

It's written by Elise Pascoe and Cherry Ripe.

http://www.amazon.com/Australia-Beautiful-...e/dp/0002553724

Has anyone had a good flick through (or better yet, own it)?

I'm interested in knowing what kind of recipes there are and how the authors define Australian cuisine.

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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Was browsing the 'Beautiful Cookbook' series on Amazon as I quite enjoy the two that I have and was surprised to find 'Australia the Beautiful Cookbook'!

It's written by Elise Pascoe and Cherry Ripe.

http://www.amazon.com/Australia-Beautiful-...e/dp/0002553724

Has anyone had a good flick through (or better yet, own it)?

I'm interested in knowing what kind of recipes there are and how the authors define Australian cuisine.

You shouldn't have too much trouble tracking down a copy at a second hand book shop or in an op shop.

I'm not sure who Elise Pascoe is, but Cherry Ripe was an influential Australian food critic.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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Was browsing the 'Beautiful Cookbook' series on Amazon as I quite enjoy the two that I have and was surprised to find 'Australia the Beautiful Cookbook'!

It's written by Elise Pascoe and Cherry Ripe.

http://www.amazon.com/Australia-Beautiful-...e/dp/0002553724

Has anyone had a good flick through (or better yet, own it)?

I'm interested in knowing what kind of recipes there are and how the authors define Australian cuisine.

You shouldn't have too much trouble tracking down a copy at a second hand book shop or in an op shop.

I'm not sure who Elise Pascoe is, but Cherry Ripe was an influential Australian food critic.

That does indeed sound promising then.

Yeah I'll go track it down at one of thost dusty bookstores if I don't end up buying it on Amazon!

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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That does indeed sound promising then.

Yeah I'll go track it down at one of thost dusty bookstores if I don't end up buying it on Amazon!

In the meantime, you should check out Neil Perry's "Balance and Harmony". I just got my amazon.co.uk delivery of it today.

They key differences between the Australian and UK versions is that the Australian one has a red cover and comes in a presentation box. The UK version does not have a presentation box, but the box design is the cover. Oh, and the UK version works out to be about $35 cheaper than the cheapest Australian price ($85 at Target) and $75 cheaper than the Australian RRP ($125).

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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That does indeed sound promising then.

Yeah I'll go track it down at one of thost dusty bookstores if I don't end up buying it on Amazon!

In the meantime, you should check out Neil Perry's "Balance and Harmony". I just got my amazon.co.uk delivery of it today.

They key differences between the Australian and UK versions is that the Australian one has a red cover and comes in a presentation box. The UK version does not have a presentation box, but the box design is the cover. Oh, and the UK version works out to be about $35 cheaper than the cheapest Australian price ($85 at Target) and $75 cheaper than the Australian RRP ($125).

What kind of recipes/theme is the book based on?

Aha! Aussies get it better this time around :biggrin:

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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What kind of recipes/theme is the book based on?

Aha! Aussies get it better this time around  :biggrin:

I'm not really convinced that the Australian buyers do get it better. What it boils down to is that you're paying $35 to $75 extra for a box. A very nice box mind you, but it's still just a box. It might have been a lot better if Australian buyers got an option on buying a limited edition with a box or a standard hardcover without a box. That would have made it cheaper, and I probably would have bought the book locally.

As for the book, it's general Asian cooking, but with an emphasis on Cantonese food.

There are three main sections, chapters within each section, and recipes that are relevant to each chapter.

The book is divided as follows:

Finding Balance And Harmony In The Kitchen

-Cooking Equipment

-Asian Ingredients

Basic Techniques And Recipes

-Sauces, Dressings, And Pickles

-Stocks And Soups

-Salads

-Braising And Boiling

-Steaming

-Stir Frying

-Deep Frying

-Tea Smoking

-Curry And Spice Pastes

-The Shared Table

Advanced Recipes And Banquet Menus

-Tofu And Eggs

-Pork

-Beef And Lamb

-Poultry

-Seafood

-Vegetables

-Noodles And Rice

-Fruit And Sweet Things

There's already a few recipes that I'm keen to try like the tea and spice smoked duck (page 148), the grilled beef with spicy dip (page 222), and the double boiled pigeons with shiitake mushrooms (page 269).

Mind you, I reckon that a few of the Chinese cooking fundamentalists will get upset at some of Perry's adaptations of Chinese food. But hey, they can worry themselves sick over authenticity, whilst the rest of us can just cook up something tasty.

Edited by Shinboners (log)
Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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Hmm is the book fairly similar to Kylie Kwong's books (of 'Modern Chinese' sort)?

The tea and spice smoked duck sounds especially good -you definately got me interested there!

I'll probably go have a flip through at the bookstores first, have a rough idea of his recipes and think on it. It certainly sounds intriguing though. Thanks for the heads up!

Psst...about 'authenticity'...there are times when I can be a bit anal about that sort of thing too but quite honestly, I'm 99% of the time all for the theory: "if it tastes good, nothing else matters!"

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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What kind of recipes/theme is the book based on?

Aha! Aussies get it better this time around  :biggrin:

I'm not really convinced that the Australian buyers do get it better. What it boils down to is that you're paying $35 to $75 extra for a box. A very nice box mind you, but it's still just a box. It might have been a lot better if Australian buyers got an option on buying a limited edition with a box or a standard hardcover without a box. That would have made it cheaper, and I probably would have bought the book locally.

As for the book, it's general Asian cooking, but with an emphasis on Cantonese food.

There are three main sections, chapters within each section, and recipes that are relevant to each chapter.

The book is divided as follows:

Finding Balance And Harmony In The Kitchen

-Cooking Equipment

-Asian Ingredients

Basic Techniques And Recipes

-Sauces, Dressings, And Pickles

-Stocks And Soups

-Salads

-Braising And Boiling

-Steaming

-Stir Frying

-Deep Frying

-Tea Smoking

-Curry And Spice Pastes

-The Shared Table

Advanced Recipes And Banquet Menus

-Tofu And Eggs

-Pork

-Beef And Lamb

-Poultry

-Seafood

-Vegetables

-Noodles And Rice

-Fruit And Sweet Things

There's already a few recipes that I'm keen to try like the tea and spice smoked duck (page 148), the grilled beef with spicy dip (page 222), and the double boiled pigeons with shiitake mushrooms (page 269).

Mind you, I reckon that a few of the Chinese cooking fundamentalists will get upset at some of Perry's adaptations of Chinese food. But hey, they can worry themselves sick over authenticity, whilst the rest of us can just cook up something tasty.

Hehehehe, the gourmets back "home" (Hong Kong and Greater China) never have many good words to say with regards to the Asian food prepared by the "gweilos". They would rather Westerners stick to "traditional" Western food (pre-international cuisine cream and butter types).

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Adrian Richardson of La Luna Bistro in Melbourne has just released a new cookbook Meat (Hardie Grant Books, Prahran, November 2008) about his recipes at the restaurant. Standard meat reference recipes along with his tips of what cuts of meat to choose from.

Good reference for anything to do with meat from chicken to venison. Perhaps Australian reviewers can reveal more about Richardson since I don't know much about him...

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Famed Auckland restaurateur Simon Gault has released his third title Nourish (Random House, Auckland, November 2008) a collection about dishes prepared at his various Auckland ventures. This is the first cookbook published in NZ that shows the impact of postmodern molecular cuisine pioneered by Ferran Adria.

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Hehehehe, the gourmets back "home" (Hong Kong and Greater China) never have many good words to say with regards to the Asian food prepared by the "gweilos".  They would rather Westerners stick to "traditional" Western food (pre-international cuisine cream and butter types).

It would be interesting to know what these people think of someone like Fuchsia Dunlop and her work on Chinese cooking.

It's just a shame that insularity prevents people from accepting the work of an outsider as the Thais have done with David Thompson.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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Adrian Richardson of La Luna Bistro in Melbourne has just released a new cookbook Meat (Hardie Grant Books, Prahran, November 2008) about his recipes at the restaurant.  Standard meat reference recipes along with his tips of what cuts of meat to choose from.

Good reference for anything to do with meat from chicken to venison.  Perhaps Australian reviewers can reveal more about Richardson since I don't know much about him...

Adrian Richardson is the chef/owner of La Luna Bistro in Melbourne. As you'd expect, he's very passionate about his meat - he ages his own meat and he makes his own sausages - and at his restaurant, you don't leave hungry.

The book is very good, but if you've already got a book like Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's "Meat" book (as I have), then you really don't need Richardson's book.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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  • 3 months later...
What kind of recipes/theme is the book based on?

Aha! Aussies get it better this time around  :biggrin:

I'm not really convinced that the Australian buyers do get it better. What it boils down to is that you're paying $35 to $75 extra for a box. A very nice box mind you, but it's still just a box. It might have been a lot better if Australian buyers got an option on buying a limited edition with a box or a standard hardcover without a box. That would have made it cheaper, and I probably would have bought the book locally.

As for the book, it's general Asian cooking, but with an emphasis on Cantonese food.

There are three main sections, chapters within each section, and recipes that are relevant to each chapter.

The book is divided as follows:

Finding Balance And Harmony In The Kitchen

-Cooking Equipment

-Asian Ingredients

Basic Techniques And Recipes

-Sauces, Dressings, And Pickles

-Stocks And Soups

-Salads

-Braising And Boiling

-Steaming

-Stir Frying

-Deep Frying

-Tea Smoking

-Curry And Spice Pastes

-The Shared Table

Advanced Recipes And Banquet Menus

-Tofu And Eggs

-Pork

-Beef And Lamb

-Poultry

-Seafood

-Vegetables

-Noodles And Rice

-Fruit And Sweet Things

There's already a few recipes that I'm keen to try like the tea and spice smoked duck (page 148), the grilled beef with spicy dip (page 222), and the double boiled pigeons with shiitake mushrooms (page 269).

Mind you, I reckon that a few of the Chinese cooking fundamentalists will get upset at some of Perry's adaptations of Chinese food. But hey, they can worry themselves sick over authenticity, whilst the rest of us can just cook up something tasty.

Just a quick question. I assumed the other day the version sold by amazon.co.uk would be a regular hardcover version without the trimmings of a gift box. I'm not prepared to pay a premium for just a cookbook especially with today's conditions and Whitcoulls and Borders both are still trying to ram the gift box version.

Is the one that you received from amazon.co.uk really the regular hardcover version? If it is still the gift box version I will wait until the second printing ships.

Thanks.

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Just a quick question.  I assumed the other day the version sold by amazon.co.uk would be a regular hardcover version without the trimmings of a gift box.  I'm not prepared to pay a premium for just a cookbook especially with today's conditions and Whitcoulls and Borders both are still trying to ram the gift box version.

Is the one that you received from amazon.co.uk really the regular hardcover version?  If it is still the gift box version I will wait until the second printing ships.

Thanks.

Please refer to my earlier post, as quoted below:

I'm not really convinced that the Australian buyers do get it better.  What it boils down to is that you're paying $35 to $75 extra for a box.  A very nice box mind you, but it's still just a box.  It might have been a lot better if Australian buyers got an option on buying a limited edition with a box or a standard hardcover without a box.  That would have made it cheaper, and I probably would have bought the book locally.

Both verions are hardcover. The Australian version has a red cover with gold lettering, whilst the UK version has the "Australian box design" as its cover.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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Just a quick question.  I assumed the other day the version sold by amazon.co.uk would be a regular hardcover version without the trimmings of a gift box.  I'm not prepared to pay a premium for just a cookbook especially with today's conditions and Whitcoulls and Borders both are still trying to ram the gift box version.

Is the one that you received from amazon.co.uk really the regular hardcover version?  If it is still the gift box version I will wait until the second printing ships.

Thanks.

Please refer to my earlier post, as quoted below:

I'm not really convinced that the Australian buyers do get it better.  What it boils down to is that you're paying $35 to $75 extra for a box.  A very nice box mind you, but it's still just a box.  It might have been a lot better if Australian buyers got an option on buying a limited edition with a box or a standard hardcover without a box.  That would have made it cheaper, and I probably would have bought the book locally.

Both verions are hardcover. The Australian version has a red cover with gold lettering, whilst the UK version has the "Australian box design" as its cover.

Thanks :biggrin: - this is to play it safe because some other UK-based sources have conflicting info and seemed to imply there is no "regular hardcover version" on sale even in the United Kingdom itself. In this case I will be on my way to place an order on the UK-based version.

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What I'm looking for in an Australian cookbook is something more like the American Joy of Cooking or James Beard's American Cookery--the kind of everyday food people cooked for their meals (and sometimes still do) without the restaurant touch of a star chef. Something that has all the basic recipes.<p>What sort of cookbooks did your mothers use?

Absolutely the best book along these lines is The Cooks Companion by Stephanie Alexander. Its a food bible for home cooks ranging from limited to above average experience. I hugely recommend it!

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Thanks  :biggrin:  - this is to play it safe because some other UK-based sources have conflicting info and seemed to imply there is no "regular hardcover version" on sale even in the United Kingdom itself.  In this case I will be on my way to place an order on the UK-based version.

It's a shame that you're not in Australia because I've seen "Balance and Harmony" for sale at $40 at Target.

Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"
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