Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

wd-50 2004 - 2007


flinflon28
 Share

Recommended Posts

The kitchen staff at WD-50 is very good. While the quality of the food likely does not suffer too much on those nights Wylie and/or Sam are away, the restaurant would lose a little of its personality. I think that this is true for many chef-driven restaurants. I applaud those chefs, like Wylie and Sam, who remain very involved in their kitchens on a daily basis. I think it makes a big diffeence and is one of the biggest reasons I think celebrity chef "chain" restaurants suffer.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hope everyone realizes I was being sarcastic with my post about Wylie in the kitchen. The point of my post was to compliment him and his staff on being so hands-on.

I agree with Doc and his thoughts about celebrity chef "chain" restaurants.

On a personal note - thanks to Doc and Marc who convinced me (because of their posts and reviews) to try WD-50 for my anniversary. My wife thanks you as well.

Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course, it's also easier for a chef like Wylie to be in the kitchen since he only has the one kitchen - makes it easier to figure out where he might be.

Not so for chefs with 2, 3, 4 (how many does JG have now?) places...

I want pancakes! God, do you people understand every language except English? Yo quiero pancakes! Donnez moi pancakes! Click click bloody click pancakes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course, it's also easier for a chef like Wylie to be in the kitchen since he only has the one kitchen - makes it easier to figure out where he might be.

Not so for chefs with 2, 3, 4 (how many does JG have now?) places...

True, but too many chefs with many kitchens only "appear" on TV.

Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just wanted to post what a fantastic meal I had there last night... The last time I went, over a year ago, I was undewhelmed.. Every dish I had last night during the tasting menu worked and was really enjoyed.

I didnt take notes or photos, we just wanted to enjoy the meal. Besides, the lighting does not allow quality photos.. So I cant share how beautiful everything looked. But since my last time there, I think the taste has really caught up to the presentation..

I was very surprised and happy for them ,to see what a high level they are operating at.

Desserts were terrific too.. My favorite was the manchego cheese cake.. All in all a fantastic experience..

Edited by Daniel (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's great, Daniel.

Fantastic to hear how wd50 is raising their game (most) all of the time.

Thanks for the report!

PS: Any other desserts stand out??? :biggrin:

Did you have the Olive Clafoutis?

2317/5000

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tasting menu (with wine pairings) last night. Rather than go through the whole multitude of dishes, a few impressions of some particularly notable ones.

Carrot-Coconut "Sunnyside Up". See, it looks like a fried egg. It has the consistency of a fried egg (the yolk even breaks and bleeds when you put your fork to it). It even has what look like little flecks of peper on it. But . . . the white is coconut and the yolk is carrot. OK, it's a gimmick. But it's also hilarious. The wine paring of a pinot noir Cava Rosado was inspired.

Shrimp Cannelloni with Chorizo Emulsion. As we all know, not only is the cannelloni's filling made of shrimp, but so is the cannelloni. But the real thrill of this dish is the chorizo emulsion. A little dab of liquid that tastes just like a delicious slab of sausage. Tastes beautiful with the shrimp. They served an assyrtika (sp?) with this. It's not so much that it was an inspired pairing as that I've lately been really taken with this wine, and this was the best example of it I've ever had (Bibila Chora "Estate White" from Macedonia).

Langoustine, Celery Root, Banana Mustard. The langoustine was just barely cooked. Now who'd think that langoustine would make a brilliant taste combination with banana? It's just amazing how well that worked. I've loved petrouchka since I was a little boy, and, as with every other foodstuff in the world, frying it just makes it better. I would almost go back tonight for more of this dish if I were sure they were going to have it. I'm not sure I'd have paired it with a pinot noir, myself, though -- even the very light New Zealand one they served.

Duck Breast, Parsnip "Ricotta", Spaghetti Squash, Black Vinegar. This provided an interesting opportunity to think about Wylie's cuisine. Because I could compare it in my mind to the fabulous duck dish I recently tried at Cafe Boulud, duck with (I think it's called) motard di fruta. Now that's a much more traditional dish than this. But it's sublime, whereas this is "only" delicious. Well, delicious and interesting. The parsnip "ricotta" was another successful culinary pun -- it has the look and consistency of ricotta, but it's really parsnip! That kind of thing would get tiresome if the food didn't taste so good. This was paired with a meritage wine I'd never heard of before, a cabernet, merlot, syrah blend from Washington called "House Wine". I'd like to explore it further.

Celery Sorbet, Peanut Butter Powder, Cinnamon Poached Raisons. I guess I've heard of people putting peanut butter on celery, but I wouldn't have thought I'd want to go near that combination myself. Until I had this astonishingly delicious intermezzo. I and my date literally gobbled this down.

Manchego Cheesecake, Foamed Pineapple, Quince. A tremendous success (and one that's available on the regular a la carte menu). It tastes like you'd think it would taste, no surprises. But you'd think it would taste great.

WD-50 will never be my favorite restaurant. My preference is for simpler, heartier food. But I love that you can get food this interesting and thoughtful for such relatively sensible prices in such a pleasant, comfortable atmosphere with so little hassle. I like WD-50 more every time I go there. Whether that means Wiley and Sam are improving or I'm getting more used to them is a moot question.

Edited by Sneakeater (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Celery Sorbet, Peanut Butter Powder, Cinnamon Poached Raisons. I guess I've heard of people putting peanut butter on celery, but I wouldn't have thought I'd want to go near that combination myself. Until I had this astonishingly delicious intermezzo. I and my date literally gobbled this down.

This is a take on the kids dish "Ants on a Log". This one dish blew us away completly, the sorbet and combo was just amazing.

mike

-Mike & Andrea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tasting menu (with wine pairings) last night.  Rather than go through the whole multitude of dishes, a few impressions of some particularly notable ones.

I, for one, have seen more than my share of lists of what people have eaten, and find impressions, particularly if the dish has already been listed upthread, much more intersting.

Carrot-coconut "Sunnyside Up".  . . .  OK, it's a gimmick.  But it's also hilarious.

I also found it quite tasty, although I thought it could easily have been pushed over the edge into a dessert as much as it was a successful savory course.

Shrimp Cannelloni with Chorizo Emulsion.  . . . .  the real thrill of this dish is the chorizo emulsion.  . . . . that tastes just like a delicious slab of sausage.  Tastes beautiful with the shrimp.  . . . . brilliant taste combination . . . .  this is "only" delicious.  Well, delicious and interesting. . . . That kind of thing would get tiresome if the food didn't taste so good.  . . . . I wouldn't have thought I'd want to go near that combination myself.  Until I had this astonishingly delicious intermezzo. 

What emerges from your account, and what's impressed me most about Wylie's cooking in the end, is that it's delicious. As much as I enjoy the visuals and contemplate the intellectual aspects of the food, putting it in my mouth is the ultimate reward.

WD-50 will never be my favorite restaurant.  My preference is for simpler, heartier food.  But I love that you can get food this interesting and thougtful for such relatively sensible prices in such a pleasant, comfortable atmosphere with so little hassle.  I like WD-50 more every time I go there.  Whether that means Wiley and Sam are improving or I'm getting more used to them is a moot question.

My preference is not particularly for heartier food, although I enjoy that as well, but I share with you a taste for Wylie's food that grows as I have more of it. That may raise the question of how long this will continue, but what I think it says is that the shock value some may ascribe to this kind of food, or even the newness of it, is not particularly at the heart of its appeal.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Carrot-coconut "Sunnyside Up".  . . .   OK, it's a gimmick.  But it's also hilarious.

I also found it quite tasty, although I thought it could easily have been pushed over the edge into a dessert as much as it was a successful savory course.

It's funny you said that, only because I meant to make that point, too, but forgot to.

What emerges from your account, and what's impressed me most about Wylie's cooking in the end, is that it's delicious. As much as I enjoy the visuals and contemplate the intellectual aspects of the food, putting it in my mouth is the ultimate reward.

And what's interesting -- as you also touch upon -- is that I distnctly did NOT feel that way the first couple of times I ate at WD-50, in its very early days. Then, I thought the food, while interesting, just didn't taste that good. Not that it was bad, but that it just seemed to put "interest" and novelty over taste.

An interesting sidelight is that I've had a similar reaction to their cocktails. In the beginning, I thought the cocktails were interesting both conceptually and in their combinations of ingredients -- but I didn't think they tasted good AT ALL. Now, I find all of them I try to be delicious. Maybe it's because I have more confidence in my judgments of cocktails than in my judgments of food, but I'm pretty sure that in the case of the cocktails they've reined themselves in a bit and changed their approach a little to emphasize taste over novelty and conceptualization. I still am not sure if that's the case with the food, or if in that case I've moved over to meet them.

WD-50 will never be my favorite restaurant.  My preference is for simpler, heartier food.  But I love that you can get food this interesting and thougtful for such relatively sensible prices in such a pleasant, comfortable atmosphere with so little hassle.  I like WD-50 more every time I go there.  Whether that means Wiley and Sam are improving or I'm getting more used to them is a moot question.

My preference is not particularly for heartier food, although I enjoy that as well, but I share with you a taste for Wylie's food that grows as I have more of it. That may raise the question of how long this will continue, but what I think it says is that the shock value some may ascribe to this kind of food, or even the newness of it, is not particularly at the heart of its appeal.

As noted above, to an extent I'd even argue that you have to get over the shock value in order to get to the food's appeal.

As for "how long this will continue", speaking for myself, I'm now liking the food so much that my taste for it may not have to keep "growing" for me to cheerfully keep returning. It can plateau right where it is and I'll be happy.

Edited by Sneakeater (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sneak great review!

I too felt the sunny side egg could have been a dessert, especially with the cardimum.. The coconut or "egg white" reminded my of the skin that would be on a snowball, minus the flakes.. I was wondering who made that dish.. Wether it was Wyllie or the Dessert Chef..

In terms of the Shrimp Cannelloni with Chorizo Emulsion.. I thought it was interesting but didnt love it.. The dish ended up tasting like a hot dog to me.. From the consistancy to the taste, it was a classy hot dog IMO..

And we also share the same feelings on his food.. I was happy to see that his tastes have caught up to his presentations..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In terms of the Shrimp Cannelloni with Chorizo Emulsion.. I thought it was interesting but didnt love it.. The dish ended up tasting like a hot dog to me.. From the consistancy to the taste, it was a classy hot dog IMO..

Ya see, to me that makes it sound good.

(Thanks, BTW.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haha.. For me I was more happy with the pickled tongue with the fried mayo.. I grew up eating tongue and felt real comfort with this.. They stabalized the mayo with xanthum I think and then fried.. It was awesome..

I jokingly asked the waiter for a plate of them.. And our waiter came back with a plate of them.. I was happily popping them through out the night. I actually shared a few with a couple sitting next to me who werent getting the tasting menu.. :biggrin:

Edited by Daniel (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't talk about that tongue dish cuz it's been so widely discussed and it seems like everybody (including me) has already had it. But I grew up with pickled tongue, too (you're not my brother, are you?), and I love that appetizer. Absolutely one of my favorite things on the menu.

I always wondered how they fry the mayonaisse. My dining companion was mystified when she saw those cubes.

(BTW, your story makes me feel better about asking, after they comped us each a glass of amaro at the end of the meal, if they could send us two additional glasses -- which they graciously did. In retrospect, I'm kind of mortified that I asked. The problem with these tasting menus with wine pairings is that, by the end, you can no longer be responsible for your conduct.)

Edited by Sneakeater (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They stabalized the mayo with xanthum I think and then fried.. It was awesome.. 

the mayo is a clasic recipe, the stabilizer used is Gellan, which is can survive some crazy temperatures, the Fat Duck use it in their pigs head terrine to hold it when fried.

personally loved this dish, seemed to come together like a deconstruction of a toasted sandwich.

Alex.

after all these years in a kitchen, I would have thought it would become 'just a job'

but not so, spending my time playing not working

www.e-senses.co.uk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is one place I have wanted to try for awhile. But I have a problem. My wife is 7 months pregnant. (ok that's not a problem) We have been doing a bit more dining out lately I guess it is a way to have some time together before the baby comes. Now on to my problem, most of the places we've been to in the last 7 months have been pretty standard and being pregnant there are a host of things my wife can't/or should not eat. Normally this would not be an issue since you can work around the menu. One of the attractions of WD-50 is how different it is from Gramercy Tavern or Babbo. I really would like to try the tasting menu but am afraid with all the inovative courses, there might be to many things she can't have.

I don't want to stress my wife or the staff trying to find out what's in each course.

Do they allow a mix of ala carte and tasting menu at the table? Any suggestions on how to handle this? Am I doomed to never go to WD-50 with my wife till next year?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They'd probably be willing to come up with something special for your wife. It's no guarantee, but in my experience they've always been very accomodating to special requests. In fact, that's one of the reasons I, and I'm sure many others, love wd-50 so much. It's totally innovative without a hint of pretentiousness.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The best thing to do would be to call them with your concerns. They are very accomodating within reason.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having not been to WD-50 since my wife has been pregnant, but having been to Per Se, Minibar (in DC) and a host of other places, I'll all but guarantee the staff at WD-50 would be happy to accomodate whatever they can for your wife. Depending on how stringent she/you/your doctor is being about diet, it's probably a good idea to call ahead and give them a list of her needs. We've also found that it's good to tell anyone who will listen that she is pregnant, so they assign the appropriate amount of "weight" to the request - otherwise, it just seems like you're being an unnecessarily picky diner.

Us: "No unpasteurized cheese".

Them: "Well, there's very little. You won't even notice it."

Us: "She's pregnant - this is really important."

Them: "Oh, NOW we understand!"

There should really be a thread about this, but I have no idea where to put it - suggestions/experiences/good rules about eating out while you're pregnant. You can read all of the books in the world on pregnancy eating, but somehow they never cover things like whether you can eat fried homemade mayo with an otherwise uncooked egg, and they never mention fish like cobia, either...

I want pancakes! God, do you people understand every language except English? Yo quiero pancakes! Donnez moi pancakes! Click click bloody click pancakes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks!

Dryden this is exactly my issue, and was a problem last night a Babbo, I wanted to do the regular tasting menu, but there were just to many items that would make it difficult to adjust. Even though we mentioned she was pregnant, they would not allow her to have the pasta tasting menu, while I had the regular one (the pasta tasting menu had less "problem" foods) We ended up doing the pasta menu.

We still have a few more chances for a nice meal and this was the first time I had encountered this problem. With WD50 being so different, I'm afraid the menu might be to difficult to work with.

I will call soon and see what they say

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm thinking of setting up some kind of hotline where people can call with questions as they come up.

So, is mozzarella always pasteurized?

What are the high-mercury fish, anyway?

How do I know if the salmon is wild?

Which dishes have raw eggs in them?

Fun, fun, fun.

I want pancakes! God, do you people understand every language except English? Yo quiero pancakes! Donnez moi pancakes! Click click bloody click pancakes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Anonymous Modernist 16589
      I'm looking to buy some new pots and pans and would like to tap into your knowledege and experiance with them. Which pans tend to yield the best and most consistant results. Same for pots. Any and all recommendations would be greatly appriciated, thank you in advance.
      Herman 8D
    • By Doodad
      Has anybody tried making a dark roux in a pressure cooker? Can this be done without scortching do you think? I have made roux in the oven before and started wondering about this topic.
    • By kostbill
      I really want to improve the flavor of my chicken breast so I want to try to inject brine with fat and flavors.
       
      I would like to try brining with some hydrocolloids. The one example I found is this: https://torontofoodlab.com/2013/08/20/meat-tenderizing-with-a-carrageenan-brine/.
       
      However I cannot apply that to my chicken breast because I am cooking it sous vide, so the chicken will not reach the temperature needed for the carrageenan to gel.
       
      I am thinking of using Methyl cellulose, first disperse in hot water, then leave it for 24 hours in the fridge, then add salt, fat and flavors and inject it.
      I am afraid that until it reaches the 50C or 60C that the Methyl cellulose needs in order to gel, the liquid will escape.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks.
    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...