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Akiko

Jap Chae Noodles

32 posts in this topic

I made japchae just this weekend and used the correct, Korean-style noodle. I had success with the method described on the packet, which called for soaking the noodles for eight minutes in about a litre of boiled water. Worked a treat, and they weren't overcooked. My Korean friend also swears by a little soy sauce in the cooking water.

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Malony is a product name, and is a type of harusame in Japanese(dangmyeon in Korean). Malony is firm in texture, and won't melt in nabe.

Japchae is the name of a dish made from dangmyeon, right?

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That depends on your preference! I prefer regular harumame.

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That packet of potato starch noodles has been falling off the top shelf on a regular basis in the pantry for a couple years. I decided to address it today. Of course I had no spinach, no scallions, and no tree ear mushrooms. I did a pantry version with white onion, cremini mushroom, and carrot for the vegetable and added garlic chive and cilantro (non traditional). The version I get from my local Korean mart does not contain sesame seeds though online recipes tend to. I smashed some dry roasted peanuts and added them for the nutty element. I did use a good soy and sesame oil as well as piloncillo for the sugar element. Had some frozen little chilis from last years crop so I briefly warmed them in some plain white vinegar to add as a condiment. I like this dish at room temp. This version is quite enjoyable.

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