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eG Foodblog: rsincere - DIY cooking school/cooking therapy in WI


RSincere
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Okay, so I had the leftover chicken QUESADILLAS, and they were very good. I also had the aforementioned Star Bar and a glass of Sprite. Soon it's time for bed. I have to remember not to eat breakfast tomorrow.

Daniel had Spaghetti-os and a banana. Told you it wasn't pretty.

Rachel Sincere
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More specifically, in the next couple of days I'm going to make chicken breasts with an apple-cream sauce.  What on earth would go with that?

Can't wait to see the Chicken with Apple Cream Sauce. That sounds incredible, Rachel.

As a sugestion you might like to try this (if not this week, sometime). Very good with chicken, and I really like it with almost any bird and fruit combo.

My Apricot Nutty Rice

Good alone, en cassoulet, also great for stuffing partially baked acorn squash halves then finish baking stuffed with the rice.

1 small box wild rice (1/2 cup)

1/2 cup brown rice

3 1/2 cups water

1/2 tsp salt

1 tbsp butter

Orange/Peach/Mango juice

3 tbsp brown sugar

6-8 dried apricots, diced

3 tbsp butter

1/3 cup pecan pieces

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground ginger

1 large egg

Bring to boil wild/brown rice together in water w/salt and butter, reduce heat to low and cover, cook for 50-55 minutes. Drain water from rice into measuring cup. Add enough orange/peach/mango juice or orange blend of your choice to make 2/3 cups. Add apricots and pecan pieces to rice.

Mix brown sugar, cinnamon, ginger, butter, and egg with juice. Pour over rice mixture. Stir lightly, scoop into 6 acorn squash halves or into a 1 1/2 qt casserole. Bake at 350 for 30-40 minutes.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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I've decided that orange zest on the beets would be overkill. It just reminds me a little too much of that cranberry dish with the orange rind in it, I have never liked that.

I'm drinking a bunch of water in ms. foodie's honor and counting the hours until my blood tests. The appointment is at 11:00 and is in the next town over, so I won't get back until almost 12:00. I'm going to cut vegetables, etc. now. I'm making pork medallions with a southwestern sauce and zucchini and stuff.

Rachel Sincere
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My token OT pic. This is to demonstrate why we rarely eat at the table. I have five cats, all in various levels of decrepitude, and it's hard enough keeping them off of the counters. They view the table as their personal show platform. Never mind the two huge expensive cat trees in the living room.

gallery_19221_3_1097861302.jpg

Here's lunch! Pork medallions with southwestern-style sauce.

gallery_19221_3_1097861360.jpg

I'm disappointed in the picture. It doesn't show how purty this food is. And I didn't even know I had a serving platter! Fancy that! I just did it this way because my kitchen looks like a cyclone hit it.

For those keeping track, pre-cooking prep was an hour and twenty minutes. Cooking time for the sauce, rice, and pork/vegetables was 40 minutes. The CIA cookbook lists the time for this recipe at 35 minutes. :hmmm:

And I'm enjoying this with a nice diet Coke. :biggrin:

Rachel Sincere
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I'm disappointed in the picture.  It doesn't show how purty this food is.  And I didn't even know I had a serving platter!  Fancy that!  I just did it this way because my kitchen looks like a cyclone hit it. 

It looks great!

(We need pix of your other four kitties... :smile:

I think in the photo you shared with us the cat is trying to look unconcerned but does know he/she shouldn't be up there... :smile: )

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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My token OT pic.  This is to demonstrate why we rarely eat at the table.  I have five cats, all in various levels of decrepitude, and it's hard enough keeping them off of the counters.  They view the table as their personal show platform.  Never mind the two huge expensive cat trees in the living room.

<snip>

For those keeping track, pre-cooking prep was an hour and twenty  minutes.  Cooking time for the sauce, rice, and pork/vegetables was 40 minutes.  The CIA cookbook lists the time for this recipe at 35 minutes.  :hmmm:

[OT] We're working right now to disabuse the kittens of the idea that the kitchen table is a place to play. It's an uphill battle, but when they do it, then the husky puppy figures he has a right to do it, too. I figure this is our excuse to add a dining room with window that go to the floor. :biggrin: [/OT]

I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who takes longer than most recipes claim. Do you think it's just that you have to mentally process the instructions before you can carry them out? That seems to be my issue. I have to keep going back to recheck the steps unless I really already know the recipe. It's worst when someone else is talking to me. My husband has finally learned that when I reach a certain frantic stage of racing around the kitchen, it's best to clear out. Recently I was testing a recipe that turned out to be grand fun at a certain incendiary stage, but he didn't dare come upstairs to see what all the whooping and laughing was about.

I think the pork and sauce looked beautiful!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who takes longer than most recipes claim.

I haven't seen the CIA bookbook yet, so I don't know how they're quantifying the time, but I have found that many recipes don't include prep time. I've gotten suckered by recipes that claim to take 30 minutes but don't tell you that you have to start the day before with chopping, marinating, killing the chicken...

I guess it helps to read the fine print in the recipe first and then gauge the real time according to how you would work in your own kitchen.

"It is a fact that he once made a tray of spanakopita using Pam rather than melted butter. Still, though, at least he tries." -- David Sedaris
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I forgot to mention that I had a small handful of puppy chow (see yesterday) while cooking the pork, because after fasting all morning I was about to die, I'm sure. :rolleyes:

And I didn't eat all my lunch because it was overseasoned, so just now (3:30) I had two slices of homemade bread with whipped cream cheese flavored with cinnamon and brown sugar. Still have a caffeine headache from this morning, so I added a diet Coke as well.

We're working right now to disabuse the kittens of the idea that the kitchen table is a place to play. It's an uphill battle, but when they do it, then the husky puppy figures he has a right to do it, too. I figure this is our excuse to add a dining room with window that go to the floor.

You think that's going to work? Don't you see what's behind Bailey? A huge screen door, which faces some woods and three large birdfeeders!

I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who takes longer than most recipes claim. Do you think it's just that you have to mentally process the instructions before you can carry them out? That seems to be my issue. I have to keep going back to recheck the steps unless I really already know the recipe.

I think part of the problem is what someone else mentioned above, that the cookbook author expects you to do some prep in the middle of cooking--"chop and drop" into the pan, as Rachael Ray puts it. I do not do that. The only time I would do that is if I had 30-40 minutes of simmering time to get something else chopped up. Otherwise, everything gets done in advance. I'm just too slow for that. If the onion/garlic is sweating for five minutes, that's not enough time for me to cut two bell peppers, a zucchini, and a summer squash into strips. I'd end up having to turn the pan off, and this has happened to me before. For instance, in this recipe, I could have started the sauce before trimming and cutting the pork loins, but I knew that the sauce would have been done before I even started cooking the pork. Also, I tend to get flustered very easily. I also, like you, need to read the instructions over and over. And even then, even though I keep the cookbook open right on the counter, I always forget something. Count on it.

I haven't seen the CIA bookbook yet, so I don't know how they're quantifying the time, but I have found that many recipes don't include prep time.

I'm really not sure. All it said was, Preparation: 35 minutes. Maybe Susan could look at her book and chime in. The pork medallions were only supposed to cook about 8 minutes, and then are held in the oven while you saute the vegetables another 3-4 minutes. When I add the recipes up myself, they seem to account for the actual cooking time plus about 5 minutes. I don't know if that's the time alloted for finding all the ingredients and doing the chopping and measuring, etc.

The pork medallions look very tasty, indeed. What kind of seasonings and spices did you use?

I just used salt and pepper on the pork itself. After I seared the pork and threw it in the oven on a cookie sheet to finish off, I threw all the vegetables (2 red peppers, a zucchini, a yellow squash) into the pan and when they gave up their juice, that's what I used to deglaze. I cooked them a bit farther than crisp-tender because I find bell peppers to be much easier to digest that way.

The southwestern sauce included chicken broth, "Creole mustard" (which I can't find and I used spicy brown mustard), cider vinegar, maple syrup, and if you follow the recipe, way too freakin' much salt and pepper. 1-1/2 tsp of crushed black peppercorns plus 1 tsp ground black pepper plus nearly 3 teaspoons of salt. This for something that reduces down to about a cup. I'm not trying to make excuses, Jason put the sauce together for me ahead of time (so that's not even counted in my prep time, BTW) and he followed the recipe exactly--and we both thought the sauce was way too salty and peppery. I don't think I would have followed the recipe for the sauce as written. Oh, forgot to add the chopped cilantro. I had it sitting in a ramekin but I never added it to the sauce. I found it later and used it as garnish.

I like the recipes in this cookbook--but in the last three I've tried, there's been something that is a little off. For instance, the 2 cups of water to stew two huge 4-quart pots full of hard vegetables in the tagine; the 3/4 cups sliced scallions per quesadilla; and now, all that salt and pepper in a sauce that is then reduced by half. I am definitely looking more carefully at the recipes, and I'm going to follow my instincts on the rest of them. Because the ideas are good, and the food is good if you tweak it!

Edited by RSincere (log)
Rachel Sincere
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RSincere Posted Today, 02:42 PM

I am definitely looking more carefully at the recipes, and I'm going to follow my instincts on the rest of them. Because the ideas are good, and the food is good if you tweak it!

Rachel, I'm so impressed that you have the courage to do this! It will only get easier the more that you cook - you'll learn more, not only about what works and what doesn't (i.e. the amount of liquid in various recipes), but what you prefer and how to achieve those results. I am just starting to learn to do this; I've found that it also helps me be less tied to the recipe book, and less flustered, as you say. If I can eyeball stuff, both in terms of amounts and time elapsed, it is much easier to 'chop as I go' and I tend to panic less.

I'm really enjoying this blog - great job! :smile:

Nikki Hershberger

An oyster met an oyster

And they were oysters two.

Two oysters met two oysters

And they were oysters too.

Four oysters met a pint of milk

And they were oyster stew.

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You know I am really impressed with your openess to both learn and blog and share it all with us too. I was just reading the thread on keeping a cooking notebook/journal and thought this might really be something that would help you as you continue to use your instincts (and in the case of journaling your memory or past experiences).

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I didn't see the thread on the cooking notebook. I will look for that.

It's funny. Several months ago, the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation had a voc eval guy come in and spend a morning with me doing all these tests. When he wrote his report, one of his recommendations was that the DVR send me to culinary school, because I told him I had a lot of cookbooks. :shock::blink::rolleyes: On the one hand, I'd love to go, and for free! to learn all these things I'm trying to teach myself. But it wouldn't be fair, because the point is for employment, and I would not be right for that kind of job. I don't take criticism well--if a chef type yelled at me, I'd probably burst into tears--and I can NOT be rushed. I'd sit and peel potatoes all day no problem, but try to hurry me along, or give me multiple tasks at once? Not going to happen. Also, it would be a waste if I can only work about 10 hours a week. So I'm happy to stay home chained to my cookbooks, taking all the time I please. And no one to yell at me but myself. :laugh:

Rachel Sincere
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I'm really not sure.  All it said was, Preparation:  35 minutes.  Maybe Susan could look at her book and chime in.

I'm probably not a good one to give you input on something like this -- except maybe to suggest that you relax and have fun and trust your instincts -- because I don't take most recipes very seriously. Maybe that's a function of more years of experience. I really do think you have good instincts, and probably with more confidence you will follow your sense of it more than following the recipe. When I read over a recipe and decide to make it, for example, I never pay attention to the time they say. If I do make a mental note of the time, I just assume it will take me a little longer. I usually only generally follow the recipe, using approximated amounts, changing the order of things sometimes, leaving something out that doesn't sound good to me, maybe adding something else, etc. Of course the exception to this is when I'm baking or officially doing a recipe testing.

...and when they gave up their juice, that's what I used to deglaze.
I read this recipe and I'm not sure what you meant by deglazing with their own juices. My understanding would have been to cook until after the vegetables gave up their juice and after the juices evaporated, and then deglazed. ...Maybe even deglaze with a little bit of wine (to me, I think wine when I read deglaze), and then some of the sauce.
...and if you follow the recipe, way too freakin' much salt and pepper.  1-1/2 tsp of crushed black peppercorns plus 1 tsp ground black pepper plus nearly 3 teaspoons of salt.  This for something that reduces down to about a cup.
There is an example of something I ignore. I always salt and pepper to taste instead of paying attention to a recipe's amount of salt and pepper.
Oh, forgot to add the chopped cilantro.  I had it sitting in a ramekin but I never added it to the sauce.  I found it later and used it as garnish.
Excellent!

I understand where you're coming from in your critiqueing of the recipes, being a beginner, and like the other folks here I admire you for sharing your learning experiences with us, in the format of a food blog. You have more courage than I would have had many years ago! However, since you asked for us to make some comments, I thought I would offer my outlook on most recipes, which is to extract the good ideas from them and take it from there. Something tells me you will be doing more of that in the future. :smile:

I'm going to follow my instincts on the rest of them.  Because the ideas are good, and the food is good if you tweak it!
Exactly. You're on the right track. Thanks for asking for our feedback, and keep up the good work!

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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I read this recipe and I'm not sure what you meant by deglazing with their own juices. My understanding would have been to cook until after the vegetables gave up their juice and after the juices evaporated, and then deglazed. ...Maybe even deglaze with a little bit of wine (to me, I think wine when I read deglaze), and then some of the sauce.

I did it a little weird. The pan was all crusty from the way I did the pork--the chunks were really thick and I thought if I pan-fried them the whole way, they'd get dry. So I seared them and put them on a cookie sheet in a 400 degree oven to finish it. Then I had the pan with all the pork stuff on it. I put the vegetables in, and after they cooked a while, the recipe said to deglaze with some of the Southwestern sauce, which has vinegar and tomato paste in it. I was using a cast iron pan, and I have been having seasoning "issues" with this pan--it keeps losing its seasoning in spots. So I didn't want to deglaze with the vinegary sauce, so when the vegetables made the pan all watery, I scraped up the pork stuff then. That probably wasn't deglazing, then. Maybe I made up something new! :biggrin:

Daniel wants everyone to know he had a vegetarian corn dog and a banana. He's enthralled by this whole food blog idea. He can't believe that people want to see what we're eating. :rolleyes:

Rachel Sincere
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Daniel wants everyone to know he had a vegetarian corn dog and a banana.  He's enthralled by this whole food blog idea.  He can't believe that people want to see what we're eating.  :rolleyes:

Had to laugh. What my family said was "I suppose you're going to tell us we can't eat until you've taken a photo?" For a couple of meals, the vultures were less than amused.

Yes, Rachel, trust your instincts. You know your instincts. You have no clue about the instincts of someone you've never dined with or, for that matter, met.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Yes, Rachel, trust your instincts. You know your instincts. You have no clue about the instincts of someone you've never dined with or, for that matter, met.

Good point. Food is such a subjective thing. The right amount of salt for me might be too much for you, or not seasoned enough. You'll soon find you have a general idea of how much seasoning you like and how you want dishes to turn out. That's the real joy in cooking - getting to where things taste the way you want, and knowing how to get there again.

Edited by tejon (log)

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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Follow those instincts! You're doing great. For ingredients like s&p it is seldom essential to the recipe to go with what was written. In baking that would be a different concern, as in salt or sugar for activation. So let your taste bugs be your guide.

As I have strict sodium restrictions I seldom add salt during cooking, waiting until later in the process, going by taste, in order to keep from building up too many layers of salt in the dish.

I thought the pork pic was very nice. You could stretch that sauce with some stock to dilute the salt content if you kept it. In our house leftovers are makeovers and I like to create something different for the second time around anyway. That sauce might make a good base for some soup.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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Breakfast--see the previous picture with the homemade bread, down to the lopsided piece, and the diet Coke! I try to have homemade bread always available for sandwiches--but we also have to make sure it gets eaten before it gets moldy.

Got a request to help out last-minute with a dog transport, so Daniel and I will be on the road at lunchtime. We're helping get shelter dogs slated for euthanasia to private rescues up north--we're meeting the driver of the previous leg in Madison, and driving the dogs to Tomah where we pass them off to the next driver. When Daniel comes with me on these (he has no choice, Jason works today) I let him pick where to have lunch. He usually picks Subway, a round sandwich with white American cheese, iceburg lettuce, and mayo.

I'm going to cook the evening meal today when I get home, it's a soup so it will hold well for leftovers. It was supposed to be a chorizo soup, but as I mentioned in a previous post, I couldn't find the Spanish kind, so I bought Usinger's andouille at the grocery store. We've never had andouille either, but I'm hoping it's somewhat similar to chorizo.

Rachel Sincere
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Boy am I late to get in on this blog!!!

Let me just say that its terrific and you are doing a fantabulous job!

Chipotles of any sort are one of my favorite things. One thing that I like to pair chipotles in adobo with, is sweet potatoes. Puree some of the chiles and the sauce together, then throw in with the sweet potatoes and mash. Lots of butter is good as well. :raz: . Also, dried chipotles, ground then heated in some butter go well with the sweet potatoes. Keep up the awesome work!!

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We're back! Boy, did those dogs stink. :blink: Jason's going to love getting his minivan back smelling like that. And does anyone want to take a turn explaining to Daniel that I can't contact germs over the Internet, and there's no such thing as a germ country with germ language? Because I gave up around mile 100. :wacko:

The shelters reimburse my gas, and this time they threw in a little extra for lunch so Daniel and I went to Burger King (or Booger Fling as we call it--because we're classy like that). Daniel had a child meal with a hamburger, ketchup only, and small fry and cherry icee. It's his treat for being in the car for about 5 hours. He didn't eat all his hamburger--he doesn't eat much. I had an angus burger, fries, and a diet Coke. The sauce and vegetables on the burger tasted really weird to me. Kind of too sweet, and with some flavor that reminded me of clove or nutmeg or cardamom. I know that those are three different flavors, but I couldn't place it. I think I would have preferred mayonnaise instead of that sauce--the burger needed something creamy with the tomato and lettuce and onion.

I've been thinking about why I have been struggling between trusting my instincts and following a recipe exactly. For so long, I wouldn't use any recipe that called for lemon--too sour. Capers--they look like gallstones. Jalapeno or cayenne--too hot. Vinegar--too sour. Fruit in a savory dish--too weird. Chipotle--way too hot. Then, when I finally got brave enough to start trying this stuff, I realized that it wasn't true. I actually like heat in my food now, and I like food with lemon or vinegar. Even capers are good.

The first time I made a pan sauce, I tasted it and it seemed way too strong, and I thought I'd ruined it. But when I decided to try it on the chicken anyway, it tasted great on the chicken. I would have never made a fruit salsa with chipotle peppers in it. Even when I tasted it alone, I didn't think I liked it very much. But it was wonderful with the quesadillas. So I'm trying to find a balance between dismissing things out of hand without even trying them, and following my gut as to what we would or wouldn't like. Now that I think about it, I probably would have used those crushed peppercorns in the Southwestern sauce, even though I know Jason doesn't like food too peppery, because I would have wanted to give the recipe a chance. I would have thought that it may be good just like the chipotle turned out to be good, etc. Maybe that explains it a little better.

Edited by RSincere (log)
Rachel Sincere
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OK. I know this is OT, but I can't resist saying good on you for the dog transport, Rachel. :biggrin: (They can be stinky coming out of a kennel. Yuck! But Febreeze really works. :wink:)

Also -- is Jason talking about something he heard at school maybe? Germ = German? :blink: You know how kids can "hear" things sometimes and relate them to something else.

It will be interesting to see how the andouille goes in your soup recipe, as it is really not that close to the dried Spanish chorizo. So it's an experiment. That's how all recipes start anyway! Alternative would be to see if you could find a recipe to use the andouille with current ingredients on hand.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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I'm definitely getting out the Febreze. These guys actually stunk up the van worse than the time I had to jam in 27 dogs!

It will be interesting to see how the andouille goes in your soup recipe, as it is really not that close to the dried Spanish chorizo. So it's an experiment. That's how all recipes start anyway! Alternative would be to see if you could find a recipe to use the andouille with current ingredients on hand.

Here are the ingredients:

chorizo, diced

onion

celery

cumin seed

garlic

chicken broth

canned plum tomatoes

potatoes

red peppers tomato paste

bay leaf

parsley

oregano

corn kernels

cilantro

I tasted the andouille. It's good, but I thought it was supposed to be HOT. It's has a very, very mild heat. Nap time first, then soup time.

Rachel Sincere
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gallery_19221_3_1097973814.jpg

It's 7:45, I haven't eaten yet but I'm not really hungry. Here's the simmering soup. Ingredients are on the prior post.

I am very comfortable making soups. The kind of soup I make is so forgiving. If I have to turn the heat to low on the onions while I mess around with the peppers, it's no big deal. If I forget to add the potatoes until later and have to simmer it an extra 15 minutes, that's fine too. I like very thick soups with a lot of stuff. I make a big pot of soup at least every other week, and then freeze half of it. There are days and sometimes weeks when I am unable to cook, and Jason's forte in the kitchen is thawing things I previously cooked. :biggrin: That is also how I use up vegetables that are looking a little sad.

My only problem right now is that I am out of food storage containers, and I'm not sure what to do with this when it cools off! :shock: I guess I can just put it in the fridge in the pot (after setting the pot in ice water), and since I have to go to Walmart tomorrow to get beets anyway, maybe I can find some kind of large (cheap) Gladware.

Rachel Sincere
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Daniel had a mini cheese pizza and the last banana. We buy about 4-5 bananas at a time, and Daniel has to have one every day. I don't like them, they give me a stomachache. Jason won't eat bananas because he heard somewhere that if you eat a banana, it changes your body chemistry and attracts mosquitos to you. No amount of eye-rolling on my part will change his mind.

Tomorrow's menu: Chicken Calvados, a recipe from The Audubon Inn in Mayville, WI; beets baked in foil and served with butter from How to Cook Everything, and rice with toasted walnuts. Would basmati rice be okay here? Do I just cook the rice and then stir the walnuts in at the end? Any suggestions? Besides basmati, I have arborio, jasmine, and converted, but I don't like the flavor of the converted rice.

Rachel Sincere
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