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percyn

Breakfast! The most important meal of the day (2004-2011)

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Wonderful breakfasts, all! Kim, your French toast looks particularly inviting.

Kitchen sink omelet with buttered multi-grain toast. Curry powder and five-spice powder mixed with the eggs; ham, cheese, chopped tomato, and roasted chile paste for fillings.

CurryOmelet11-01.jpg

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Since I picked up 4 pounds of bacon at a Pennsylvania smoke house yesterday, I knew I was going with that. We only had 2 eggs left and the only bread was some Oat Nut stuff... So I made some simple pancakes with about 14 small strips of bacon :raz: Thick pancakes for my husband, then I add water to the batter and make myself thin ones.

It was worth getting 4 pounds of the bacon...the rest of which is nicely vac sealed in 4 to 6oz packets

tracey


Edited by rooftop1000 (log)

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@C. Sapidus--have you ever tried making Thai-style omelette? The ground pork is mixed with the eggs (and other stuff) before cooking. Whenever I see your omelettes, for some reason I think of my dad's Thai omelette. I think it's because of the colour (fat is important!). :smile:

eta Like this one http://www.tan-kitchen.com/2008/09/omelette.html


Edited by prasantrin (log)

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@C. Sapidus--have you ever tried making Thai-style omelette? The ground pork is mixed with the eggs (and other stuff) before cooking. Whenever I see your omelettes, for some reason I think of my dad's Thai omelette. I think it's because of the colour (fat is important!). :smile:

eta Like this one http://www.tan-kitchen.com/2008/09/omelette.html

Thanks for linking that recipe, prasantrin. I look forward to trying it next time we have a little extra ground pork.

I think my favorite omelets are a sort of hybrid - a French-style folded omelet with almost-runny insides, but overstuffed with strongly-flavored fillings.

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I can't read this thread without wanting to crack and egg and brown some sausage. Lovely breakfasts, everyone!

I don't do breakfast very often, but today we wanted buttermilk blueberry pancakes:

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Along with:

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@C. Sapidus--have you ever tried making Thai-style omelette? The ground pork is mixed with the eggs (and other stuff) before cooking. Whenever I see your omelettes, for some reason I think of my dad's Thai omelette. I think it's because of the colour (fat is important!). :smile:

eta Like this one http://www.tan-kitchen.com/2008/09/omelette.html

WooHOO! Egg Fu Yung, my favorite! :blush: (Joke, but true, nonetheless)I dearly love this type of omelette, despite my mom making (in her words) a "Chinese Omelette" with the contents of the La Choy Homemade Chop Suey Kit, which came with a can of veggies, mostly bean sprouts, and a can of 'sauce'. The veggies went in with the eggs, and the 'sauce' went over the top. :huh:

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This morning I decided to cook some sausage I had ground last night.

I simply can't stand the typical "brillo-pad" effect one gets with simply frying sausage patties so I prepare them the way I learned many years ago, which also keeps them from shrinking so much.

I also wanted a smoky flavor but really didn't have the time to smoke them.

So, first I brewed some Lapsang Souchong tea:

HPIM3800.JPG

I put the brewed tea in a skillet and brought it to a boil then added the fairly thick sausage patties:

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The advantage to this, while it takes a bit longer to cook, the sausage is cooked all the way through and yet remains tender:

This photo shows there is still some color to the liquid escaping from the interior.

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The juices are now clear.

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Completely cooked but still moist and tender. And you can see that the shrinkage has been much less than when they are fried.

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Here's the "money shot"

closeup sausage.jpg

Served with biscuits and an omelet. Sorry, forgot to take photos of the other stuff.

And the slightly smoky flavor from the Lapsang Souchong added the perfect finish.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

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Andie, what a great idea to cook sausage patties that way. I routinely do it for links (both with casings and without), but never thought to do the patties that way. From now on, I will. Thanks !

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Andie, what a great idea to cook sausage patties that way. I routinely do it for links (both with casings and without), but never thought to do the patties that way. From now on, I will. Thanks !

I like the way the grease magically "disappears" so there is no need to drain the sausages.

Do try it with the Lapsang Souchong tea. I use it to add a smoky flavor to many foods that are not suitable for actual smoking.

I mentioned in another thread that I had gotten a Smoking Gun but returned it because it didn't really infuse the food with smoke flavor.

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I didn't cook this breakfast; I had it at the restaurant (The Brick) we go to every Sunday with my dad's dad and family. French Toast, eggs over easy, sausage and hashed browns. I don't ever put syrup on my FT, but I do dip them in the eggs. I like the egg mixing with the powdered sugar. The rest of my family looks on aghast.

164722_683474819024_20305918_38195466_7496818_n.jpg

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That looks delicious, emilyr. Sweet and savoury on the breakfast plate, like eggs and French toast(!), is not something you ever really see in Australia and it tickles me every time.

My breakfast was a pretty simple but good combination of rye crispbread, with avocado, lime, flaky sea salt and pepper, and home-cured salmon.

salmon.jpg

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Andiesenji, great idea on the sausage patties. I will be trying that.

Today, because it looked like this outside my window:

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I decided I needed this:

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Steel cut oats, with butter and brown sugar. My first time to try steel-cut oats; I'd always just eaten the regular Quaker variety. BIG difference! I'm a convert.

Oh, and then I finished up with this:

004.JPG

and a cup of French press coffee. I think I'm about ready to go out and brave the frozen South.

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... My breakfast was a pretty simple but good combination of rye crispbread, with avocado, lime, flaky sea salt and pepper, and home-cured salmon.

Mmm. How do you cure your salmon ? I've cured (simple brine) & smoked my own, and I'm fascinated to hear about your approach and flavourings, if you don't mind :smile:

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Great looking meals all.

Oh and KayB - that aint snow! You wanna see snow, look north!

Blether - if I may suggest:

- Equal amounts salt and brown sugar (coat the salmon) and half the amount of cracked black pepper - slather on, and add tons of chopped Dill - lately I have been using a bit of Vodka or Gin to splash on. seal well, put in your fridge and weigh it down flat, 2-3 days, drain the juice - enjoy.

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... My breakfast was a pretty simple but good combination of rye crispbread, with avocado, lime, flaky sea salt and pepper, and home-cured salmon.

Mmm. How do you cure your salmon ? I've cured (simple brine) & smoked my own, and I'm fascinated to hear about your approach and flavourings, if you don't mind :smile:

Blether - if I may suggest:

- Equal amounts salt and brown sugar (coat the salmon) and half the amount of cracked black pepper - slather on, and add tons of chopped Dill - lately I have been using a bit of Vodka or Gin to splash on. seal well, put in your fridge and weigh it down flat, 2-3 days, drain the juice - enjoy.

That's about the extent of it, for a gravlax-style salmon anyway. Mine was a 'white' cure of just white sugar, salt, white pepper and vodka. I also love beetroot-cured salmon, where you pack the salmon fillet in grated beetroot to cure it. Comes out beautifully rosy pink and with a slight earthiness from the beet, just lovely. Like this (not my blog).

Edited to add other variations I've tried for the cure flavourings:

  • Chineseish - flavourings of sugar, salt, Sichuan pepper, a little five spice, shaohsing wine, scallions and ginger
  • Vietnameseish - sugar in the form of both sugar and caramel sauce, salt, fish sauce, cassia/cinnamon, star anise, black pepper and chilli. Added a splash of Vietnamese moonshine.
  • Thaiish - palm sugar, salt, lemongrass, galangal, red chilli, tamarind, crushed coriander roots and leaves, and garlic. Didn't use alcohol here and it was fine, slightly different texture.
  • Japaneseish - yuzu koushou, Okinawan black sugar, soy sauce and a mirin/sake combo
  • Frenchish - sugar, fleur de sel, herbes de Provence, lavendar petals, and some Pernod. I used fresh thyme too but it was too overpowering by the end of the cure so would omit that next time.

The only really terrible one was the one with toasted belacan shrimp paste, cardamom, turmeric, chilli, pureed shallots and young coconut juice. Flavours were just too much, too muddy, too shrimp pasty and overwhelmed the salmon. Don't know what I was thinking with that one!


Edited by rarerollingobject (log)

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This week I've been hooked on hotdog tacos - grilled hotdog pieces, a bit of grilled onion, and some home-style potatoes in a hot corn tortilla. So delicious with a bit of green salsa. Will try to snap a pic next time I have this.

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This week I've been hooked on hotdog tacos - grilled hotdog pieces, a bit of grilled onion, and some home-style potatoes in a hot corn tortilla. So delicious with a bit of green salsa. Will try to snap a pic next time I have this.

That sounds yummy. For breakfast though?

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Another gratin - this time using a piece of defrosted salmon, cut up, and some cauliflower florets:

DSCF0623.jpg

... with a couple of slices of toast spread with cod's roe, and hot tea.

ETA: rarerollingobject, thank-you, and for all the combinations, too. A dry cure with some booze - I'll have to try that. I have to admit, sadistick, that I'm not much of a fan of dill - I can eat gravlax but I find myself asking "why ?"


Edited by Blether (log)

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Well - I love Dill, so there :raz:

You can substitute the dill for another herb, chives would work, garlic chives could really be nice as well.

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That looks delicious, emilyr. Sweet and savoury on the breakfast plate, like eggs and French toast(!), is not something you ever really see in Australia and it tickles me every time.

My breakfast was a pretty simple but good combination of rye crispbread, with avocado, lime, flaky sea salt and pepper, and home-cured salmon.

Thank you, rarerollingobject, and may I say that your salmon looks divine. I cured some salmon for my dad for his birthday a few years ago, and he's been begging me to do it again. I may have to try that this week. . .

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Well, it's a national holiday and I got up before 5am. I'd thought I might get round to it last night but didn't, so I cooked off the pork shoulder roast I've had salting in the fridge the last few days, this morning:

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- this is the same pot roast pork that was my first post in Dinner!, where everyone was very kind, and I posted the recipe there too. I only roasted it in the oven for 2 hours this time, and that was ample.

I can't get the Hock any more. This time I used a basic Spanish white. I figured that with half a batard on hand, and the oven on, garlic bread (not shown - garlic, parsley, pepper) would be a good idea and that's what I served it with.

DSCF0630.jpg


Edited by Blether (log)

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Creamy soft-scrambled eggs with chorizo, onion, tomato salsa, and serrano chiles, served on warm corn tortillas.

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Bruce, I made Moe a similar breakfast to yours one morning this week.

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I had leftover homemade flour tortillas from the night before. Topped with fried potatoes and green onions, bacon, cheese, scrambled eggs and salsa.

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Nice meals all.

From a few weeks ago - Fried Egg and Smoked Duck Breast w/Crispy Duck Skin

DSC_6876-1200edited.jpg

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