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dagashi


torakris
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My favorite dagashi is Chiroru Choco.  It's only 10 yen, and jingle was "10yen attara chiroru choco:  buy chciroru choco if you have 10 yen." 

Is Chiroru Choco is considered to be dagashi?

Is this the stuff you are talking about?

http://www.tirol-choco.com/collection.html

I didn't look too much but it doesn't seem to go back as far as most dagashi, Hiroyuki? :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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It is a dagashi, but unfortunately, it was popular in the Kansai area and I have never eaten it before. In the Kanto area, rice choco (rice chocolate) was popular.

Tirol choco:

http://www.okashi.co.jp/dagasi/da_ti005.html

Rice choco:

http://www.okashi.co.jp/dagasi/da_ra001.html

http://homepage1.nifty.com/nekocame/60s70s...5.htm#ricechoco

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For me, dagashi are the things of the past - I cherish them together with all of my childhood memories, but I am not very keen on buying or eating them now.

For those of you who wish to buy and eat dagashi, here are two links:

Dime shop in Shinyokohama Raumen Meseum:

http://www.raumen.co.jp/english/shops.html

Ebisu Dagashi Bar:

http://r.gnavi.co.jp/g485002/

This is a shot bar. At a charge of 500 yen, you can have as many dagashi as you can eat.

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  • 1 year later...

One of the 100 yen shops near our house has a small dagashi corner with about 30 to 40 products, you can buy 4 of them for 100 yen (less than $1).

Our latest trip included some of the following

gallery_6134_119_16427.jpg

Though I don't care for most of them (especially the long flat thing that supposedly tastes like corn and cream corokke), I really like the black one on the right. It is a sour lemon candy and each bag has three pieces, while two are normally flavored one is extremely sour. You are supposed to share it with two other friends and see who "wins". :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Hmm...this is interesting! We don't have a dagashi-ya within walking distance, ...but all the neighborhood kids know where the dagashi-ya is to be found, even though it's a 30-minute cycle trip, and make optimistic pilgrimages there before every school trip, because the amount of snacks they can take on a trip is defined by purchase price, not by quantity of food.

The current head of 6th grade was practically lynched because she cut the permitted expenditure from 300 to 100 yen...

I agree about those flat crumbed fried sheets, they come in tonkatsu and ebi flavors too, just as vile as the korokke flavor.

The "surprise" lemon candies are one of our favorite small gifts for taking back to New Zealand. There are a couple of other types which have one chili-laden candy etc.

Sour plums are a great choice for school trips, and the kid who pulls out a few just when everybody else is surfeited with candy and gum is very popular. That particular type of hard red plum doesn't seem to be available as "real" food, only as dagashi.

Anybody else think that anzu are fading out of the dagashi scene? I rarely see those anzu ice candies around these days either - they are a really primitive mash of sweetened anzu (skins, fiber, pulp, the lot!) in a tubular thin plastic sleeve, just like the more expensive ice bars that you freeze and then mush up to suck out of the container.

Hiroyuki, your dagashi past will come back to haunt you when your child is old enough to make frequent school trips!

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Ah, I recognize one thing in that picture... Marukawa gum. It's a favorite in our house. It's just the right amount of bubble gum for a small child.

There's a restaurant in Visalia, CA that gives out boxes of it when you order their children's meal. My kids look forward to eating there when we visit their great-grandparents.

Cheryl

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  • 1 year later...

I wasn't familiar with Tirol Choco until someone mentioned it somewhere on the Japan Forum.

I bought this (10 pieces all connected together) for the very first time at a 100-yen shop.

gallery_16375_4595_52125.jpg

10 small pieces for 100 yen... I don't think it's a good buy.

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I wasn't familiar with Tirol Choco until someone mentioned it somewhere on the Japan Forum.

I bought this (10 pieces all connected together) for the very first time at a 100-yen shop.

gallery_16375_4595_52125.jpg

10 small pieces for 100 yen...  I don't think it's a good buy.

They're a lot more expensive if you buy them separately, so it's a good buy for what it is.

I like tirol chocolates a lot. The best ones are almond, matcha, and kinako. The vanilla shio (shio vanilla?) is not bad, but a bit sweet, and my coworker loves the ume one (I think it's too sweet). I kind of like the new cheese one. I thought it would be like cheesecake, but it's really more like a savoury cheese flavour. It's a bit of a surprise given the chocolate is sweet, but I quite liked it.

Edited by prasantrin (log)
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I wasn't familiar with Tirol Choco until someone mentioned it somewhere on the Japan Forum.

I bought this (10 pieces all connected together) for the very first time at a 100-yen shop.

gallery_16375_4595_52125.jpg

10 small pieces for 100 yen...  I don't think it's a good buy.

They're a lot more expensive if you buy them separately, so it's a good buy for what it is.

I like tirol chocolates a lot. The best ones are almond, matcha, and kinoko. The vanilla shio (shio vanilla?) is not bad, but a bit sweet, and my coworker loves the ume one (I think it's too sweet). I kind of like the new cheese one. I thought it would be like cheesecake, but it's really more like a savoury cheese flavour. It's a bit of a surprise given the chocolate is sweet, but I quite liked it.

The thing is, as a Kanto man, I can never be nostalgic for Tirol Choco. In my childhood, Rice Choco was popular in Kanto, and I never had Tirol Choco then.

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