• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
little ms foodie

Chinese Restaurant in the ID

73 posts in this topic

LainerX and I had lunch at Takohachi yesterday, and the saba shioyaki is to die for.  It comes with your choice of steamed rice, curry rice, or fried rice.  My husband recently couldn't stop talking about the fried rice, which I never usually order, so I got it.  OH MY GOD.  It's better than any fried rice I've ever had, mostly due to the very generous amount of BACON.  And the mackerel was stunning.

We had a lot of fun reading the little posters on the wall that have descriptions of some of the dishes on their menu.  Our favorite quote was "You can make your own hotness," which we thought might be a good headline for the cover of Cosmo or Maxim.    :biggrin:

Thank you for the recommendation Kathy. We went for lunch at Takohachi a few days ago and my husband and I agree, it is probably the best fried rice we have ever eaten! I took your rec and ordered the mackerel, which was very tasty. I don't think I'd ever had it before except as sushi. This was a rather large beautiful piece of fish that I shared with my husband, as a little mackerel goes a long way with me. I took a photo and will post it soon. I found the service a bit slow, but I think they were understaffed the day I was there, 1 waitress with all tables full (note, the place is small, though).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe likes to go to the Ocean City noodle shop (ie. not the main restaurant), which he calls "Duck Chop", because that's where they chop the BBQ duck. We always get some form of the noodle soup with roast duck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joe likes to go to the Ocean City noodle shop (ie. not the main restaurant), which he calls "Duck Chop", because that's where they chop the BBQ duck.  We always get some form of the noodle soup with roast duck.

Good for Joe. I am glad that someone else goes there too. I usually end up going there after 9:00 in the evening on my way back to Tacoma and I just want something simple, quick & inexpensive. There is a woman who cooks with all white hair who I really like. Somehow she seem to get the food/noodles/congee the way I like it. I probably wouldn't go there as much if she was not cooking. Sometimes they have dim sum leftover from the nicer restaurant. If they have any of my dim sum favorites, I just have them warmed it up for my late night meal. WL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We both had Congee--didn't try the noodles like Susansea, and maybe we should have. The Congee was lukewarm, very bland, not much of the featured meats and goodies. The BBQ comes from the place next door (actually connected) but I didn't catch the name.

Now I want to try Takehachi....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to egullet pnw I am now officially turned on to Seven Star Pepper. The food is great (no extra grease, excellent and distinct flavors, veggies cooked, yet still crunchy just how I like), the staff is friendly. Those hand shave noodles are very fun. I've only been there twice this week....


Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just tried a newer restaurant in the ID. Vegetasia (5th and King in the old Top Gun). While it is vegetarian, it is definately traditional authentic cantonese. We had the fried bean curd sheets with vegetables, the seaweed deep fried rolls and the Crispy Taro Roll. All that I can saw is Wow. Each dish was great, however if I had to choose one dish it would be the fried bean curd sheets. I had never had a dish using the bean curd sheets in fried form. They picked up the sauce while still being crispy. I am going again tomorrow with one of my co-workers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks Vinelady about the heads up for "Vegetasia". I love good vegetarian when I can find it. I am hoping to try it on my next venture to the ID.

On a different note, I had dinner at "Takohachi" last Saturday. It has been a couple of years since I ate there last with my late Japanese dad. Our last experience there had been a good one. They do a good job for what they charge. They have a great menu. That said, I was not expecting much on this visit and it was a good thing. Perhaps it was an off night but I hate it when they give you bad service when you dine alone. The place was not busy as it was just after 5:30 when they opened. They could have been nicer. I am trying to overcome my inclination to bolt out of Asian restaurants for no good reason other than"bad vibes" so I stayed. I got the miso ramen and fried rice combo. I had been looking forward to trying the fried rice again after reading the posts on this thread. The rice was good except that onions were (temperature) hot but not cooked. The sharp raw onion overpowered the rest of the dish. I love onions but this gave me indigestion afterwards. I didn't feel that it was a good idea to complain or send back the dish as they didn't really seem to care if I was there or not. The miso ramen was just okay. Even though I have complaints about this place, I would probably go back again but probably a friend.

One of my current Japanese favorites in ID are: Fort St. George (accross the street from the old Uwajimay site, on the 2nd floor) 601 King St. Ste. 202, (206)382- 0662, for Japanese spagetti, Japanese dorias (rice gratins) and their hamberger steak and funny colored soft drinks with ice cream and whip cream.

The other favorite is Fuji Sushi, 520 Main St. 98104 (206) 624-1201. A little more expensive than Takohachi but still a good value for the money. I may have posted this before but excuse the repeate info. This restaurant was a particular favorite of my dad's and other Japanese ex-pat's. This is the restaurant that the Seattle Go (board game) center takes visiting Japanese professional "Go" players to.

By the way, I recently had dinner at "I Love Sushi" in Bellevue for the first time and did love it. I am aware that this is topic for restaurants in the ID. I didn't have any of the sushi but had the tempura, many of the fabulous tofu dishes and the fried banana-strawberry spring roll (with fruit/ice cream/chocolate sauce et al) dessert. I would drive to Bellevue for this place. Most likely based on this last wonderful experience of great service and food I was sorely dissapointed with Takohachi. Sincerely, WL

(edited for lots of typos and errors) wl


Edited by white lotus (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Each dish was great, however if I had to choose one dish it would be the fried bean curd sheets.  I had never had a dish using the bean curd sheets in fried form.  They picked up the sauce while still being crispy.  I am going again tomorrow with one of my co-workers.

If you like bean curd sheet, Teapot on Capitol Hill uses them a lot. There's a fried seaweed/beancurd sheet thing that sounds similar to what you describe. It's called Treasure of the Sea or something like that...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There use to be an "I love Sushi" on eastlake, is it still there??

Yup, haven't been there in almost a year and half though, they had complete turnover in their sushi chefs all of a sudden and I just stopped going.

Rocky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you like bean curd sheet, Teapot on Capitol Hill uses them a lot.  There's a fried seaweed/beancurd sheet thing that sounds similar to what you describe.  It's called Treasure of the Sea or something like that...

I have been to teapot many times and this place is really so much better. Teapot tends to be more americanized than I like.


Edited by vinelady (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just back from Dim Sum at the China Gate. Yum! I thought it was great. And the price was sooooooo cheap!!

Can't recall everything we had but I am chalking it up to research for Char Siu Bao that I'm attempting to make this weekend.

eGullet Cook Off


Edited by little ms foodie (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
... We went for lunch at Takohachi a few days ago and my husband and I agree, it is probably the best fried rice we have ever eaten! I took your rec and ordered the mackerel, which was very tasty.  I don't think I'd ever had it before except as sushi.  This was a rather large beautiful piece of fish that I shared with my husband, as a little mackerel goes a long way with me.  I took a photo and will post it soon.  I found the service a bit slow, but I think they were understaffed the day I was there, 1 waitress with all tables full (note, the place is small, though).

This is my long overdue photo of our lunch at Takohachi.. from top down, miso soup, mackerel w/ pureed daikon on side. Bowl of bacon fried rice, (forget what the tiny bowl is), steamed rice topped w/housemade furikame (that came with hub's lunch), salad w/ 2 croquettes and bowl of udon (more of hub's lunch). Quite tasty, all of it.

[gallery_655_656_1106414135.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that looks like a nice chunk of saba! And they didn't skimp on the daikon, either. I'm going to have to get down there soon....Thanks for the great picture BH.

Jan


Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I visited Seven Stars Pepper recently, first time in a while, so I thought I would report. It was my fifth visit, spread out over the several years since it's opened. It's probably a good sign that, in a group of five people, two Chinese, this was the place we were able to agree on. (I'm not Chinese.)

I can't remember the name of every dish we ordered, but I will try. We ordered fairly randomly, trying what to me were all new things. The real standout was the deep fried chicken, Szechuan style. I was the one who insisted on trying this and I was actually very confused. I thought maybe they would deep fry a whole chicken, the way they deep fry a whole crab (we had that the first time and as everyone says it's awesome, especially the crispy edible pieces that form at the thin pieces near the joints). But no, this was little chicken pieces deep-fried in breading. Fortunately, the breading was fantastic. Also, it came with green beans that had been stir-fried with some hot peppers. Really really good chicken nuggets, I guess. Very addictive.

Nothing else was quite so memorable, but nothing was bad (well the sweet-and-sour chicken was boring except for the mild shock of the accompanying raw onion, but we only ordered it because we had a suspected spiceophobe in the group). Baby bok choy and garlic was nice, the vegetable flavor pretty intense, cooked in a nice broth. The crispy noodles wasn't that exciting. Neither was the twice-cooked beef. (All this was ordered in Chinese, so I have no idea if the noodles were hand-shaved, if that's even an option. But quite likely not.) I do love how when you order things here, you get so much more than you expected. It's true that you get crispy noodles, but you also get all this unannounced stuff on top of them, like mushrooms and onions and chicken (if I'm remembering right) and whatever else. The beef also came with all kinds of vegetables. It's one of those menus where you really have to order everything to figure out what you like.

Scallion pancake was good, but not outstanding. The fortune cookie contained a flattering message. OK! I think that's plenty long enough. Definitely don't skip the deep fried chicken, Szechuan style, next time you go.

BradS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We took a group of 6 friends to Seven Stars the other night-none had ever been-and everyone was blown away. They loved every single dish we ordered, esp. our favorite, the Szechuan crab. Brad, I too like to randomly order dishes there-my latest delicious discovery is the hot pepper shredded potatoes.

I'm going to NYC later this week and have planned a meal at a highly recommended Szechuan place (Grand Sichuan International). I've never made it a point to seek out Szechuan food when I travel so I'm interested to see how it compares to my Seattle favorite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(All this was ordered in Chinese, so I have no idea if the noodles were hand-shaved, if that's even an option. But quite likely not.)

I love Seven Star Pepper. I could eat there every week. That is exactly what I've done the past 3 weeks anyhow. It has never been crowded when I've been there (off-hours admittedly), so I hope they are doing well.

You would know if you had the hand-shaved because instead of being skinny and string-shaped, they are white-ish and about 1/4 inch thick, uneven, and have a wonderful melting texture that is just so very right and perfect for the Dan Dan Noodles!


Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went back a couple of weeks to Takohachi when I was in town, and I swear the saba shioyaki and fried rice was one of the best things I've ever eaten in my life. If I had to pick a "last meal," that would be it, without hesitation.


"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I went back a couple of weeks to Takohachi when I was in town, and I swear the saba shioyaki and fried rice was one of the best things I've ever eaten in my life.  If I had to pick a "last meal," that would be it, without hesitation.

I went recently and I have to agree. The saba shioyaki is probably the best I've ever had. Also, I went for lunch and it was a huge portion of both the saba and the rice and my total was less than 10.00 if I remember correctly. I really love the little pickled cabbage too, but I wanted more of it....greed!!

Jan


Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

daily lunch report- today I tried Tropics on Weller. very tasty thai food! it was packed but they seem to move people through pretty quickly. It will also be a return stop as I would like to try many things on their menu. (obviously not chinese as this thread is titled!)


Edited by little ms foodie (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

little ms foodie, have you tried Phnom Penh on King St.? They have big bowls of seafood noodle soup that are perfect on cold, rainy days. Wish I could get there more often!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
little ms foodie, have you tried Phnom Penh on King St.?  They have big bowls of seafood noodle soup that are perfect on cold, rainy days. Wish I could get there more often!

no I haven't! where abouts on King is it or what is it near...I'll put it on my list!! :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      I was recently asked by a friend to give a talk to a group of around 30 first-year students in a local college - all girls. The students were allowed to present me with a range of topics to choose from. To my joy, No. 1 was food! They wanted to know what is different between western and Chinese food. Big topic!
       
      Anyway I did my best to explain, illustrate etc. I even gave each student a home made Scotch egg! Which amused them immensely.

      Later, my friend asked each of them to write out (in English) a recipe for their favourite Chinese dish. She has passed these on to me with permission to use them as I wish. I will post a few of the better / more interesting ones over the next few days.

      I have not edited their language, so please be tolerant and remember that for many of these students, English is their third or fourth language. Chinese isn't even their first!

      I have obscured some personal details.

      First up:

      Tomato, egg noodles.

      Time: 10 minutes
       
      Yield: 1 serving

      For the noodle:

      1 tomato
      2 egg
      5 spring onions

      For the sauce:
       
      1 teaspoon sesame oil
      1 tablespoon sugar
      ½ teaspoon salt

      Method:

      1. The pot boil water. At that same time you can do something else.

      2. Diced tomato. Egg into the bowl. add salt and sugar mixed. Onion cut section.

      3. Boiled noodles with water and cook for about 5 minutes.

      4. Heat wok put oil, add eggs, stir fry until cooked. Another pot, garlic stir fry the tomato.

      5. add some water to boil, add salt, soy sauce, add egg
       
      6. The tomato and egg sauce over noodle, spring onion sprinkled even better.
       


      More soon.
    • By zend
      I just bought these greens from the neighborhood Asian grocery. Had them once in China as a salad, and they tasted exceptional - a bit peppery like arugula, yet much more subtle and fresh, with hints of lemon.
      Store lady (non-Chinese) could not name them for me other than "Chinese greens".
      Any help identifying them is greatly appreciated
       

    • By liuzhou
      China's plan to cut meat consumption by 50%
       
      I wish them well, but can't see it happening. Meat eating is very much seen as a status symbol and, although most Chinese still follow a largely vegetable diet out of economic necessity, meat is still highly desirable among the new middle classes. The chances of them willingly giving it up, even by 50%, seems remote to me.
    • By JohnT
      I have been asked to make Chinese Bow Tie desserts for a function. However, I have never made them, but using Mr Google, there are a number of different recipes out there. Does anybody have a decent recipe which is tried and tested? - these are for deep-fried pastry which are then soaked in sugar syrup.
    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.