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thebartrainer

Molecular Cocktails

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Are you thinking of doing this with sodium alginate/calcium chloride, or gelatin and cold oil?

the former.

In either case, I think this would be extremely tricky, especially with the high proof of Chartreuse.

I'd got that impression.

AFAIK, alcohol interferes with both gelatin and alginate, so the only real option would be a reverse spherfication using a sodium alginate bath and calcium chloride in the Chartreuse

Hmmm...I hadn't thought of that...interesting...

(see this post, for example).

OK- I'll check that out. Thanx! :biggrin:

Sincerely,

Dante

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That pesky Eben Freeman is making the news again...

Eben Freeman Turns His Cocktails Solid Just for the Hell of It

Tailor’s new “solids,” a series of edible cocktails. There are currently three on the restaurant’s menu...“Cocktail geeks are coming in and asking me all these questions,” Freeman complains. “This is just to have fun!” And, he adds, soberly, to “push the boundaries” of mixology. No wonder they’re curious.

Oh, we're just a curious bunch.

But, uh, White Russian Breakfast cereal?


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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See, that stuff of Eben's seems whimsical and fun. I think "molecular mixology" has got to get past the becoming-tired-cliché of spherification tricks.


--

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I think "molecular mixology" has got to get past the becoming-tired-cliché of spherification tricks.

We're not quite there yet. Today's NY Times has an article on Cointreau's spherification kit.

A BARTENDER’S arsenal has looked roughly the same for a century or so. Just about any drink in the book can be whipped up with a sturdy bottle opener, a corkscrew, a long-handled bar spoon, a sharp knife and an all-purpose cocktail shaker.

Now a liquor company wants to convince bars that they will not be complete without a magnetic agitator, magnet extractor, syringes and a stash of powdered chemicals.

Starting Thursday, Rémy Cointreau, the global wine and spirits corporation, will begin teaching a coterie of New York bartenders how to deploy those tools and chemicals to shape tiny edible balls filled with Cointreau. The company calls the balls Cointreau caviar and suggests that bars spoon a few into a Cosmopolitan or a flute of Champagne.


Edited by jmfangio (log)

"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

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Now, if that's not an indication that spherified cocktails have joined Arthur Fonzarelli in mid-air, I don't know what is.


--

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David Arnold, the director of culinary technology at the French Culinary Institute, said, “There’s so much to be done with drinks that’s not being done that doesn’t involve tiny little balls.”

interesting article...

if i made spherified balls of flavor i'd probably lie and claim it existed a hundred years ago... the tradition of a land you've never known... high concept things are cool but not when they are left to sit naked... everything needs a sense of humor and some cultural depth added to it...

strangely the most pressing issue to me at the moment is my bartenders were diluting my lime juice with water... 50/50... they said it was too tart and they wanted to stretch it out... i was speachless... how do you grow when you have wierd individuals doing insane stuff likeing diluting your acid?

i try and teach them about the concept of "the average of everyone's tastes"... when you make fifteen mojitos for a group of fifteen everyone individually will have different tastes but to be successful you need to hit the average... for sweet and tart history has shown that it is more or less one oz. of 1:1 simple to one oz. of lime juice... if you use your diluted lime juice you might please 5 of the 15 but you start to alienate the other 10...

balance theories by emperical study and measurement & portioning technologies (jiggers) seem to be the most pressing issues in mixology...


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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I just got back from the spherification demo held by Cointreau and it was pretty amazing.

They have created a sphereification lab kit for bars that makes it pretty easy to produce on a large scale as well as the technique for using alcohol in encapsulation.

The kits included everything needed to make the cointreau gold leaf spheres

magnetic agitator

scale

beakers

sodium alginate and malodextrin

calcium lactate

gold leaf flakes

strainers, spoons, syringes

and the best thing -- the pearl dropper.

It takes about 5-7 minutes to make up a batch of the cointreau gel which can then be held in the pearl dropper for service. When a drink ticket comes in, you turn the dropper upside down and the pearls form in the sodium alginate bath.

We sampled both the cointreaupolitan with spheres as well as a champagne cocktail with spheres. Both interesting from a textural thing more than anything else.

Overall it was a great hands on demo of how to make them. We all had our own little station for working at with the full kit of tools.

Definitely going to play around with the idea a bit more.


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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tonight i drank sparkling sauvignon blanc... they don't exist in the wild but with a little molecular mixology anything is possible... it has a particularly fun aromatic intensity... i can't wait to top a french 75 with it...

a winemaker told me that carbonation increases aromatic intensity... certain wine varietals could become obnoxious if they were anymore intense which is why they don't exist in sparkling versions under any tradition... cocktails love near obnoxious intensity at times... so a market just emerged!

does anyone know anything about surface tensions and dissolving CO2 in liquids? what is the optimal for keeping a gas from escaping a liquid and how do you create the optimal if it doesn't already exist?

i want freshly squeezed (no more than an hour old) sparkling grapefruit juice... the surface tension of the natural juice doesn't like being injected with bubbles that much... can it be done?


Edited by bostonapothecary (log)

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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I just got back from the spherification demo held by Cointreau and it was pretty amazing.

I'm curious, John (and this may seem like a ludicrous question): presumably the spherification lab is designed specifically for Cointreau? But there's nothing to prevent using the toolkit for any other liquid, is there, should a bartender be of such a mind? I assume there are proof- and/or spirit-specific concentrations of the various chemical components that would need to be tweaked, and that would be a matter of trial and error, yes?

Christopher

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does anyone know anything about surface tensions and dissolving CO2 in liquids?  what is the optimal for keeping a gas from escaping a liquid and how do you create the optimal if it doesn't already exist?

i want freshly squeezed (no more than an hour old) sparkling grapefruit juice... the surface tension of the natural juice doesn't like being injected with bubbles that much... can it be done?

Where did you get this idea about surface tension? As far as I know, solubility of a gas in a liquid depends on the gas, liquid, temperature and pressure. But since we're talking about dissolving carbon dioxide into water, for our purposes we can consider this a constant. Solubility, then, depends upon temperature and pressure. Lower temperatures and higher pressures correspond to greater solubility. Time can also be a variable, depending on the carbonation technique used, simply to allow the gas sufficient opportunity to dissolve into the liquid.

We create fizzy liquids by dissolving carbon dioxide into water under increased pressure (chilling the liquid also helps, of course). The liquid fizzes because, when the liquid returns to regular atmospheric pressure, the gas comes out of solution, forms bubbles and we get effervescence. Actually, most of the carbon dioxide simply escapes from the surface of the liquid into the atmosphere without forming bubbles. In order to form bubbles within the liquid, nucleation sites are needed -- usually provided by microscopic pieces of cellulose or tiny points on the surface of the glass (little known fact: the best champagne classes are etched by the manufacturers to provide nucleation sites throughout the glass). Carbonated water in a perfectly clean, flawless glass would not form bubbles.

The size and extent of the bubbles is largely determined by the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved into the liquid, with larger bubbles corresponding to greater amounts of dissolved gas. One reason why we consider small bubbles desirable in champagne is that a certain amount of carbon dioxide is lost through the cork as the wine ages and therefore an aged champagne containes less carbon dioxide compared to a young champagne. The chemical composition of the liquid can also have a minor effect on the characteristics of the bubbles, and of course on the formation and character of a "head" on the liquid as the bubbles rise to the surface. This, and a whole lot more, is explained well in the book Uncorked: The Science of Champagne by Gérard Liger-Belair.

In the formation of persistent bubbles at the surface of the liquid, which is not the same thing as "keeping the gas from escaping the liquid," surface tension and other variables can be important. If you want a persistent foam like that, I would suggest including some egg white in the charger with your liquid.

As for your grapefruit juice. . . so long as it is as cold as possible when carbonated and spends sufficient time under pressure, you shouldn't have any problems. An hour is a fairly short time period, however, if you're using a seltzer bottle. You should also consider that citrus juice is full of suspended particles. These make great nucleation sites and are likely to make the carbonated juice lose its fizz rather quickly. You might consider running the juice through a fine filter (perhaps experiment with a Büchner funnel filter) to remove these particles to the greatest extent possible. Adding some gum arabic could be interesting as well, as it should result in good head retension.


Edited by slkinsey (log)

--

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does anyone know anything about surface tensions and dissolving CO2 in liquids?  what is the optimal for keeping a gas from escaping a liquid and how do you create the optimal if it doesn't already exist?

i want freshly squeezed (no more than an hour old) sparkling grapefruit juice... the surface tension of the natural juice doesn't like being injected with bubbles that much... can it be done?

Where did you get this idea about surface tension? As far as I know, solubility of a gas in a liquid depends on the gas, liquid, temperature and pressure. But since we're talking about dissolving carbon dioxide into water, for our purposes we can consider this a constant. Solubility, then, depends upon temperature and pressure. Lower temperatures and higher pressures correspond to greater solubility. Time can also be a variable, depending on the carbonation technique used, simply to allow the gas sufficient opportunity to dissolve into the liquid.

We create fizzy liquids by dissolving carbon dioxide into water under increased pressure (chilling the liquid also helps, of course). The liquid fizzes because, when the liquid returns to regular atmospheric pressure, the gas comes out of solution, forms bubbles and we get effervescence. Actually, most of the carbon dioxide simply escapes from the surface of the liquid into the atmosphere without forming bubbles. In order to form bubbles within the liquid, nucleation sites are needed -- usually provided by microscopic pieces of cellulose or tiny points on the surface of the glass (little known fact: the best champagne classes are etched by the manufacturers to provide nucleation sites throughout the glass). Carbonated water in a perfectly clean, flawless glass would not form bubbles.

The size and extent of the bubbles is largely determined by the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved into the liquid, with larger bubbles corresponding to greater amounts of dissolved gas. One reason why we consider small bubbles desirable in champagne is that a certain amount of carbon dioxide is lost through the cork as the wine ages and therefore an aged champagne containes less carbon dioxide compared to a young champagne. The chemical composition of the liquid can also have a minor effect on the characteristics of the bubbles, and of course on the formation and character of a "head" on the liquid as the bubbles rise to the surface. This, and a whole lot more, is explained well in the book Uncorked: The Science of Champagne by Gérard Liger-Belair.

In the formation of persistent bubbles at the surface of the liquid, which is not the same thing as "keeping the gas from escaping the liquid," surface tension and other variables can be important. If you want a persistent foam like that, I would suggest including some egg white in the charger with your liquid.

As for your grapefruit juice. . . so long as it is as cold as possible when carbonated and spends sufficient time under pressure, you shouldn't have any problems. An hour is a fairly short time period, however, if you're using a seltzer bottle. You should also consider that citrus juice is full of suspended particles. These make great nucleation sites and are likely to make the carbonated juice lose its fizz rather quickly. You might consider running the juice through a fine filter (perhaps experiment with a Büchner funnel filter) to remove these particles to the greatest extent possible. Adding some gum arabic could be interesting as well, as it should result in good head retension.

that is a good summation. i wonder if it was the abundence of suspended particles that caused the failure with the grapefruit juice. gonna have to try it again...


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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I just got back from the spherification demo held by Cointreau and it was pretty amazing.

They have created a sphereification lab kit for bars that makes it pretty easy to produce on a large scale as well as the technique for using alcohol in encapsulation.

The kits included everything needed to make the cointreau gold leaf spheres

magnetic agitator

scale

beakers

sodium alginate and malodextrin

calcium lactate

gold leaf flakes

strainers, spoons, syringes

and the best thing -- the pearl dropper.

It takes about 5-7 minutes to make up a batch of the cointreau gel which can then be held in the pearl dropper for service.  When a drink ticket comes in, you turn the dropper upside down and the pearls form in the sodium alginate bath.

We sampled both the cointreaupolitan with spheres as well as a champagne cocktail with spheres.  Both interesting from a textural thing more than anything else.

Overall it was a great hands on demo of how to make them.  We all had our own little station for working at with the full kit of tools.

Definitely going to play around with the idea a bit more.

I was interested in the kit and hoping that someone would have caught a picture of it. I am particularly interested in the Pearl Dropper since good tools are still things everyone is looking for. I read in the NYT that it looked like a cheese or pepper flake shaker. The magnetic agitator sounds like a good addition and I assume that is like one of the lab stirring machines with a spinning magnet in the bottom. Otherwise I would think that they would have all the chemicals in pre-measured portions of some sort because I cannot see a bartender fiddling with a gram scale in strobe lights.

/Tim

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if i made spherified balls of flavor i'd probably lie and claim it existed a hundred years ago... the tradition of a land you've never known... high concept things are cool but not when they are left to sit naked... everything needs a sense of humor and some cultural depth added to it...

But the key is to ensure you at least have your facts straight or have an unverifiable story. I remember going to a restaurant at the top end of the list of best kitchens. We did a wine tasting and the Sommelier was always very descriptive and it sounded like he had trudged around the mud in his rubber boots.

I knew a particular wine area very well however, which was a reason I was looking forward to a specific wine in the tasting menu. And on he starts describing how this one variety comes from the North slope which has more clay content than the Southern slope. However looking at the vines they had very similar qualities blah blah blah.

So I then said that from the Northern slope one had a very good view of a valley and did he see this particular landmark? The Sommelier stuttered a bit then went tut-tut and explained that he had only ever seen pictures and had never even been to Europe.

Did I feel taken for a ride!

/Tim

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if i made spherified balls of flavor i'd probably lie and claim it existed a hundred years ago... the tradition of a land you've never known... high concept things are cool but not when they are left to sit naked... everything needs a sense of humor and some cultural depth added to it...

But the key is to ensure you at least have your facts straight or have an unverifiable story. I remember going to a restaurant at the top end of the list of best kitchens. We did a wine tasting and the Sommelier was always very descriptive and it sounded like he had trudged around the mud in his rubber boots.

I knew a particular wine area very well however, which was a reason I was looking forward to a specific wine in the tasting menu. And on he starts describing how this one variety comes from the North slope which has more clay content than the Southern slope. However looking at the vines they had very similar qualities blah blah blah.

So I then said that from the Northern slope one had a very good view of a valley and did he see this particular landmark? The Sommelier stuttered a bit then went tut-tut and explained that he had only ever seen pictures and had never even been to Europe.

Did I feel taken for a ride!

/Tim

you are right you need to be careful. there is an art to a good story and a good sense of humor...

"this is a specialty of rural borneo or least it SHOULD be... they have all the ingredients..."

i think wine should be taken a little more seriously. its ok to mix and manipulate it but alot more time, blood, sweat and tears go into it than any silly liqueur i make...

with wine also i've gotten to a point where i dont' like to endorse a pairing unless i've actually tried it... luckily i get to try alot... its a big practice to bluff on pairings but i've found when you actually start obsessively trying things its so counter intuitive...

bluffing and experimenting with cocktails is great fun... you can construct and present a new drink with out ever having previously tasted it in confidence mainly because you know the contents of sugar, alcohol, bitter and acids you are working with...


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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OK- tried several techniques, including the reverse spherification (what I got from that reminded me of the H.P. Lovecraft line about "Ye liveliest awfulness". It was so hideous I threw it out in to my back yard rather then in to my trash can- I'm sure some day its children will come crawling out of the woods seeking revenge on me :unsure: )

I even tried diluting the Chartreuse, using it as just a flavouring, but even the smallest amounts still interfered with the process, so I guess it's just chemically impossible.

Oh well, it was a good idea, just not a viable one... :sad:

Sincerely,

Dante

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Over in the Stomping Through the Savoy topic in a bit of accidental molecular mixology I discovered that substances high in pectin gel in alcohol solutions.

Might it be possible to use pectin to form something like a caviar? Would be more like a jelly ball...


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I was interested in the kit and hoping that someone would have caught a picture of it.

Ask and ye shall receive:

gallery_26869_4681_87.jpg

More pictures from the event here.

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Nice. Thanks for that. I would have thought that for 1450 USD they atleast wouldn't make basic spelling mistakes on the labels i.e. could afford to have a proofreader ;)


"Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less. " - Marie Curie Sklodowska

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For those that want to see the pearl dropper in action, there is a video floating around youtube from the Paris event


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Everyone on this thread should take a look at playboy this month the March issue. There are 3 pages dedicated to Molecular Mixology. I guess this means it has hit the main stream now. If you only want to look at the articles I think it is page 77.


Todd Thrasher

The Guy who says YES CHEF and Sometimes makes a cocktail or two.

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I received my Biozoon Cocktail Pro set today. I was wondering if anyone has bought or used this set ? http://www.biozoon.de/shop/product_info.php?info=p28_.html

There's a great book that comes with the set with around 50 recipes. Unfortunately it's in German so I have to start learning it soon.

However the set looks very professional and is intended specially for cocktails. It also has 2 interesting ingredients that I never came across before. One is some sort of dye and the other something that makes drinks glow in UV light as far as I can tell.


"Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less. " - Marie Curie Sklodowska

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Hello,

Sounds like an interesting set that you've just invested in. Perhaps you could share more about the 2 unusual ingredients that you'd mentioned with this forum? More details and some pictures (being used, look of ingredient, etc) perhaps?

Provocachic(sm): "what would your story taste like?"

I received my Biozoon Cocktail Pro set today. I was wondering if anyone has bought or used this set ? http://www.biozoon.de/shop/product_info.php?info=p28_.html

There's a great book that comes with the set with around 50 recipes. Unfortunately it's in German so I have to start learning it soon.

However the set looks very professional and is intended specially for cocktails. It also has 2 interesting ingredients that I never came across before. One is some sort of dye and the other something that makes drinks glow in UV light as far as I can tell.

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I will definately do that when I give them a go over the coming weekend. I might need some help from a German speaker :blink:


"Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less. " - Marie Curie Sklodowska

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I'm still getting my head round the German instructions which are not as easy as I thought. Even a German I met at the weekend had trouble to explain it to me. However the 2 ingredients that I mentioned are:

Riboflavin (E101) and Beta-Carotin (E160a)

gallery_52569_5903_20854.jpg

The Riboflavin is supposed to make drinks "glow in UV light". Unfortunately I don't have a UV at home to see what the effects are.

gallery_52569_5903_18968.jpg

The Carotin is meant to give "deeper colour" to drinks

gallery_52569_5903_9124.jpg

The other ingredients are Agar Agar, Sodium Alginate, Calcium Chloride, Methylcellulose and Xanthan.

gallery_52569_5903_7280.jpg

The set comes with a metal measuring spoon, 2 3ml dropper pipettes, a measuring cup up to 25ml, a plastic spoon and book - instructions and recipes.

gallery_52569_5903_12376.jpg

As soon as I get my head round the Geman obstacle and have any results I will definately report back. I'm a complete novice to this game. :hmmm:

The one thing that struck me so far with all the ingredients of the set is that they seem to be dosed with the metal spoon that comes with the set. No weighing involved i.e. Dissolve 4 spoons of alginate in 120ml of water. Then mix 20ml of the mixture with 40ml of cocktail. 4 spoons of Calcium Chloride in 130ml of water to make the bath.

That is if my guesses of the German are correct.


"Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less. " - Marie Curie Sklodowska

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Wow, an article in Forbes Online about Molecular Mixology?

What is the world coming to?

Molecular Mixology, Lauren Sherman, 07.01.08, 6:00 PM ET

Flame and gelatin are two important components of a bartending trend that's migrating from upscale lounges to amateur kitchens. Known as molecular mixology, the method takes scientific principles and tools and applies them to the construction of alcoholic beverages. These cocktails often require their creator to freeze, gel or flambé ingredients, and with the exception of a few wildly dangerous drinks, most can be made at home.

Includes recipes from Eben Klemm, Darcy O'Neil, Jamie Boudreau, and Claire Smith.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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      The moment that Ferran Adria strode towards Thomas Keller on the stage at the CIA/Greystone’s World of Flavors’ “Spain and the World Table” Conference was electric -- as if a giant Van de Graf generator had been turned on. The feeling didn’t subside when Adria took the stage from Keller; it only became more pronounced as the packed crowd rose to its feet, raining applause, admiration and love on the Spanish master. Adria accepted the response with aplomb, and gave it right back to the audience -- and to his fellow Spanish cocineros, who were standing off to the side. He brought each one up to join him on the stage for a rousing thank-you to the conference organizers, sponsors and participants. Once this emotional release subsided, Adria got down to what everyone had been waiting for -- his discussion and demonstration.

      Ferran Adria, with eyes sparkling like the finest cava, began speaking Spanish in a voice as gravelly as the beaches of the Costa Brava, while Conference Chairman Jose Andres translated. The crowd, hushed and straining for every word, moved forward in their seats as Adria explained El Bulli and himself, with a lesson in recent culinary history thrown in. Ferran explained that El Bulli is not a business. While offshoots of El Bulli are operated on a for-profit basis, the restaurant runs without profit as a primary motivation. For example, he said, the greatest difficulty they have is distributing reservations. Given the extraordinary demand and the severely limited supply, he explained that they could simply raise the price of a meal to the point where the supply and demand met. Indeed, the price of a meal at El Bulli is in itself quite reasonable given the stature of the restaurant and well within means of most motivated diners should they be able to get there, and this is how Adria prefers it. He stated that he was not interested in cooking solely for those with the most money. He prefers to work for people with a true interest in exploring the limits of cooking with him. To this end he showed a short film depicting “A Day in the Life . . .” of El Bulli set to the Beatles’ song of the same name. The film showed a couple’s response to the experience.

      Ferran’s voyage into creativity began with a visit to Jacques Maxima at Le Chanticleer Restaurant in Nice, France. He learned from Maxima that to be creative is not to copy. This idea changed his entire approach to cooking -- from making classic cuisine to making his own. Aware of elaborate books of French cuisine, Adria resolved to catalogue his work, the results of which are the richly detailed El Bulli books, published by period. These books, as wonderful as they are, are huge and extremely expensive. During his presentation, Adria announced -- and demonstrated -- that the individual dishes photographed and described in a chronology within each book are all now available online at elbulli.com.

      He finished the philosophical discussion by talking about the general style of haute cuisine that he and others are engaged in. While others have coined the term “molecular gastronomy” to highlight the scientific component of the creativity involved, Adria rejected it, saying that all cooking is molecular: most of his techniques are in fact rather simple and don’t employ radical new technology. Most of the technology that they do use has been around for some time; they have simply adapted it to their own purposes. Nevertheless, he applauds contributions to gastronomy from Harold McGee and other food scientists, and welcomes their collaboration in the kitchen. He has yet to find a term that describes the movement: as of now, he feels that there really is no good name for this style of cooking.

      More than any other single thing, Ferran Adria is known for the use of “foams” in cooking. While he is proud of his achievements with foams, he stressed that while appropriate in some circumstances, the real utility of foams is limited. He bemoans their ubiquity -- and wishes to not be blamed for others’ poor deployment of the concept. In the course of describing this and other techniques, Adria made a point of stating that using them should not be inferred as copying. Techniques and concepts are to be used and shared. He invited everyone to learn and harness whatever they found interesting, and to employ it in to their own pursuits.

      Another set of techniques discussed and demonstrated by the master and his assistant, Rafa Morales from Hacienda Benazuza, included three types of spherification. These included the use of calcium chloride (CaCl) and sodium alginate as well as the converse, and exploration of a new agent, gluconodeltalactone. The original combinations of alginate into CaCl for “caviar” production, and CaCl into alginate for larger “spheres” have chemistry-related limits as to what can be sphericized. In private correspondence, Harold McGee explained to me that Adria described encapsulating a mussel in its own juice. While this would make the dish technically an aspic, unlike conventional aspics it remains a liquid. Adria said that though gluconodeltalactone is very new, and they are just beginning to get a handle on it, he is very excited by it. He also demonstrated a machine for spherification on a larger scale than they had originally been able to do, as well as liquid nitrogen and freeze-drying (lyophilization) techniques. At the conclusion of his demonstration -- and thus the Conference -- the audience once again awarded him a standing ovation.

      While Adria’s appearance was the culmination of the conference, the energy it produced was not just because of his stature in the world of gastronomy -- it was also due to the excitement generated by the conference that preceded it. If there had previously been any doubt, Thomas Keller’s welcome of Adria was a clarion: Spanish cuisine has landed on North American shores and is finding a niche in the North American psyche. Spanish cuisine -- in its multifaceted, delicious entirety -- lives here, too.

      + + + + +

      John M. Sconzo, M.D., aka docsconz, is an anesthesiologist practicing in upstate New York. He grew up in Brooklyn in an Italian-American home, in which food was an important component of family life. It still is. His passions include good food, wine and travel. John's gastronomic interests in upstate northeastern New York involve finding top-notch local producers of ingredients and those who use them well. A dedicated amateur, John has no plans to ditch his current career for one in the food industry. Host, New York.
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