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StudentChefEclipse

Sweet Breads, Breakfast Breads....

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I love fruit in breakfast bread, but have a difficult time finding recipes without nuts in the loaf as well. Is there a "bread science" reason for the nuts or can I just forge ahead with extra fruit in lieu thereof?

Also... what is your favorite sweet/fruit/breakfast bread?

Thank you!

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I love fruit in breakfast bread, but have a difficult time finding recipes without nuts in the loaf as well. Is there a "bread science" reason for the nuts or can I just forge ahead with extra fruit in lieu thereof?

Also... what is your favorite sweet/fruit/breakfast bread?

Thank you!

Hi,

There's certainly no rule regarding nuts--leave them out if you like and bump the fruit. I love raisin bread and am particularly fond of raisin focaccia--with lots and lots of raisins. It's a great breakfast bread. There's a version I developed for Fine Cooking in one of their back issues. See if they have it archived. I also love good multi-grain breads (like Struan, my all-time favorite), toasted, and with butter and strawberry jam. It's a meal!

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