• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Stone

The World's Best Coconut Cake

91 posts in this topic

I agree, the crispy edges were great!

The cake tasted a lot better the next day, assembled, and having set in the fridge. It was well received at the BBQ as well, and I have two requests for the recipe. :smile: The biggest compliment came from someone who said it was one of the best cakes she's ever tasted. :biggrin:


Edited by Ling (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm looking for something similar to carrot cake, but a little more dense and gooey. I'm thinking if it had some texture (from desecated coconut) in it, that would be nice too.

It has to be sturdy enough to unmold from a flexipan.

Anyone have a recipe in the ballpark?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe you could try replacing the almond meal in a financier recipe with coconut? Grinding the coconut in a food processor would give you a finer cake texture, unless you want the flakes to be noticeable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hum.........if you have a recipe you love, you could make a carrot cake with-out carrots, replace it with coconut.

My favorite coconut cake recipe comes from Iga Gartener (I hope I spelled her name right). I think I got it over on Martha S.'s site. It fits your description pretty well.......depending upon how you bake it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe you could try replacing the almond meal in a financier recipe with coconut? Grinding the coconut in a food processor would give you a finer cake texture, unless you want the flakes to be noticeable.

Financier is definetely not the texture I'm looking for. I'm looking for something between a carrot cake and an almond joy candy bar.

Hum.........if you have a recipe you love, you could make a carrot cake with-out carrots, replace it with coconut.

My favorite coconut cake recipe comes from Iga Gartener (I hope I spelled her name right). I think I got it over on Martha S.'s site. It fits your description pretty well.......depending upon how you bake it.

Interesting idea simply substituting coconut in a carrot cake recipe...but Carrot imparts a lot of moisture, while dessicated coconut is basically a sponge. I would think that would lead to a less moist product. Did you mean fresh coconut? If so, have you tried this or seen it done before?

In any case, I'm off to search for that Gartener recipe. Thanks!

EDIT: Found the recipe, and it looks pretty solid. I'm going to maybe try and substitute half the buttermilk with coconut milk and give it a whirl.


Edited by Sethro (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, yes you can't use dissicated coconut (I don't even keep it around myself) as is, it is a sponge.

You can either moisten it by sprinkling h2o or try coconut milk until it becomes moist and sticky like the kind you find in grocery stores. Thats what I do if they accidently order in dry coconut at my work. I moisten it in a ziplock baggie............like if I was trying to color the coconut. Best yet, start with really moist coconut. I like the moist stuff you get at the grocery store...........it makes the best coconut baked goods, imo.

I know I descent from commonly accepted practices here, but I never/rarely use dissicated coconut. It's too dry!!! Only good for meringues. It has to take liquids away from your recipe to rehydrate. If not, you can't even taste it. I also don't like it's texture rehydrated as well as other moist consumer types of coconut.

Try a couple recipes comparing the two, I'll be shocked if you don't like the moist coconut more.

Also back to the carrot cake...........sans carrots.........it all depends upon your recipe. I make a super moist carrot cake that uses oil not butter and it isn't "cake like" it's very dense and moist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ah, yes you can't use dissicated coconut (I don't even keep it around myself) as is, it is a sponge.

You can either moisten it by sprinkling h2o or try coconut milk until it becomes moist and sticky like the kind you find in grocery stores. Thats what I do if they accidently order in dry coconut at my work. I moisten it in a ziplock baggie............like if I was trying to color the coconut. Best yet, start with really moist coconut. I like the moist stuff you get at the grocery store...........it makes the best coconut baked goods, imo.

I know I descent from commonly accepted practices here, but I never/rarely use dissicated coconut. It's too dry!!! Only good for meringues. It has to take liquids away from your recipe to rehydrate. If not, you can't even taste it. I also don't like it's texture rehydrated as well as other moist consumer types of coconut.

Try a couple recipes comparing the two, I'll be shocked if you don't like the moist coconut more.

Also back to the carrot cake...........sans carrots.........it all depends upon your recipe. I make a super moist carrot cake that uses oil not butter and it isn't "cake like" it's very dense and moist.

Very good point...I don't know why I was stuck on the dessecated coconut track!

If it's not a familly secret, can you post your carrot cake recipe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My recipe is at work..........I tried to find it online where I orginally found it, but didn't have any luck. I'll post it asap.

Have you found the Gartner recipe at Marthas?

What are you pairing with this?

Iga's (maybe it's Inga?) recipe is a lightish colored cake where as my suggestion of a variation on a carrot cake will still be dark like a fruit bread.

The thing is, that moist coconut contains alot of sugar and most pro's want to control that by using a non-sweetended coconut.

The only recipe where I really notice the sugar level in the moist coconut is when I make coconut macaroons, I do adjust down the amount of sugar I use in that recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ina Garten's coconut cupcake recipe

Here are some others you might be interested in trying:

Emeril's fresh coconut cake

coconut cake

coconut bundt cake

coconut pound cake

And lastly, I'm partial to this recipe, but I do make a few changes in my version. I scale down the ingredients for the cake by about a 1/4, as I like a higher ratio of filling to cake. Also, I increase the amount of sour cream by a few tablespoons, and use dessicated, unsweetened coconut in the filling. I prefer the finer texture.

Peninsula Grill coconut cake

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My recipe is at work..........I tried to find it online where I orginally found it, but didn't have any luck. I'll post it asap.

Have you found the Gartner recipe at Marthas?

What are you pairing with this?

Iga's (maybe it's Inga?) recipe is a lightish colored cake where as my suggestion of a variation on a carrot cake will still be dark like a fruit bread.

The thing is, that moist coconut contains alot of sugar and most pro's want to control that by using a non-sweetended coconut.

The only recipe where I really notice the sugar level in the moist coconut is when I make coconut macaroons, I do adjust down the amount of sugar I use in that recipe.

I found Ina's recipe last night, thanks. I'm going to test it tommorow, substituting coconut milk for buttermilk. Hopefully the change in acid levels doesn't majorly change the desired texture. I'll let you know the results, of course.

FYI that recipe actually calls for sweetened coconut flake, so it should be good to go as is.

Ina Garten's coconut cupcake recipe

Here are some others you might be interested in trying:

Emeril's fresh coconut cake

coconut cake

coconut bundt cake

coconut pound cake

And lastly, I'm partial to this recipe, but I do make a few changes in my version. I scale down the ingredients for the cake by about a 1/4, as I like a higher ratio of filling to cake. Also, I increase the amount of sour cream by a few tablespoons, and use dessicated, unsweetened coconut in the filling. I prefer the finer texture.

Peninsula Grill coconut cake

Thanks for the legwork! I'll check those out as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When using suoermarket coconut I dump it in a french cap / seive and rinse it untill it runs clear. I have found you end up with moist coconut without the sweetness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the soaking the coconut with coconut milk idea

I tried the carrot cake theory awhile ago, in a way.

I made the parsnip cake recipe of Sam Masons, as it appeared to be in that vein, then I went back and made the recipe with coconut and it was too dry.


2317/5000

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked Ina's coconut cake, but after putting the leftovers in the frige, I found it to be too dense. The texture really changed. I'm not sure if letting it come back to room temp. would have solved this problem because I was having a sugar attack and had to have it now! Next time it sits on the counter until it's gone!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I just tried Ina's recipe.

First, I followed it to the tee, and it came out very moist, but not very "coconuty" and definetely not sticky.

Then I tried substituting coconut milk for buttermilk, and it came out noticeably worse, so scratch that. I think the solution for the flavor issue would be sticking with the buttermilk but adding a teaspoon or so of coconut extract.

Still, my main issue is the stickiness, or rather lack there of. I confess that I've never actually gone and tried to make a cake stickier, so I'm totally in the weeds.

I'm thinking about maybe just substituting some of the sugar with corn syrup or glucose, but I have absolutely no idea what that would do.

Anyone know anything about sticky-ing-up cakes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might want to look at some sticky toffee pudding recipes and see if they can be adapted. They are usually served with a caramel sauce but it probably isn't necessary. Or some type of steamed pudding. I think those usually come out quite sticky too.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been watching this thread for a couple of days and I have a recipe for a coconut carrot cake that everyone always loves. I just tell them it's carrot cake and don't tell them what kind of carrots. It calls for a 4 oz jar of baby food carrots! If you didn't like the idea of baby food, I suppose you could just steam some carrots and puree them in the food processor. It really is a very rich and filling cake and you just can't seem to stop eating it. If you would like the recipe, I can post it.

This is my first post here so I'm a bit nervous about posting a recipe when there are professionals around!!

Valerie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not on the official welcoming commitie by a long shot, but welcome and thanks for posting!

Post your recipe for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was flipping through an old issue of Bon Appetit today and Francois Payard had a really simple recipe for coconut cake. Basically, it was just coconut, sugar, and eggs (whisked over a double boiler, then combined with the coconut and sugar). I can post measurements tomorrow if you're interested. The cake baked, then layered with ganache.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the "unofficial" welcome, Seth!! Here is the humble recipe. You could add raisins if you wanted to, but that is probably a whole 'nother thread!!

Coconut Carrot Cake

3 eggs, lightly beaten

2 cups sugar

4 oz. jar baby food carrots

1 cup oil

1 cup crushed pineapple w/juice

2 cups AP flour

2 tsp baking soda

1 tsp salt

2 tsp vanilla

2 tsp cinnamon

1 cup shredded coconut

1 cup walnuts, chopped

Frosting:

8 oz cream cheese, softened

1/2 cup butter or margarine, softened

3 cup powdered sugar, sifted

2 tsp vanilla

1 cup walnuts, chopped

Mix all cake ingredients in large bowl until moist. Pour into 1-9 x 13 or 2-9-inch round oiled pans. Bake at 350 for 35 - 40 minutes or until it tests clean.

For Frosting: Combine cream cheese, butter and vanilla. Add powdered sugar one cup at a time, beating until smooth between each addition.

Cool cakes on rack. Frost then top with chopped walnuts. Can be served as is or frozen for later.

Serves 12

I hope you enjoy this. My family and co-workers love it.

On another note, I made the Coconut Cupcakes from Ina Garten for the 4th of July. I had coconut milk but no buttermilk. I substituted it straight across but put in a bit of vinegar because I was worried about not having the acid the original recipe called for. It worked great. Not sure that it was any better than the original recipe, but I liked the idea of using coconut milk to give it that extra punch of flavor. I also lightly toasted the garnish coconut. The adults went for those and they just kept getting better the longer they sat.

Valerie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was flipping through an old issue of Bon Appetit today and Francois Payard had a really simple recipe for coconut cake. Basically, it was just coconut, sugar, and eggs (whisked over a double boiler, then combined with the coconut and sugar). I can post measurements tomorrow if you're interested. The cake baked, then layered with ganache.

Mmmm that sounds like those Spanish style macaroons that are just milk, sugar, eggs and coconut. I would LOVE the measurements, please!

I also lightly toasted the garnish coconut. 

Valerie

I've been baking them in a fleximold, and lining the bottoms with a thin layer of toasted coconut. They're going to have the tops layered off and then be served inverted so they're nice and neat looking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Success! We have achieved stickiness.

I tweaked the Ina Gartener recipe to my liking. Here's what I wound up with:

Coconut Sticky Cake

12oz butter

1c sugar

1tsp salt

1c light corn syrup

5 eggs

1+1/2tsp vanilla extract

2tsp coconut extract

2c cake flour

1+1/2tsp baking powder

1tsp baking soda

1c buttermilk

12oz sweetened flake coconut

Spray release and sugar molds. Preheat oven to 350.

Cream butter with sugar and salt.

Beat in Cornsyrup, followed by eggs and extracts.

Beat in 1/2 of the dry ingredients, followed by the buttermilk and then the remaing dry ingredients.

Fold in coconut flakes.

Bake for 24 minutes.

Cool, unmold and invert.

With this recipe I found no need to line the bottom of the molds with additional coconut. Additionally, the corn syrup seems to inhibit the height and doming enough so that its hardly necessary to level them. Yay!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sethro, thanks for sharing what you came up with! I'll have to add it to my "list of things to try". It sounds delicious. :)


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going to suggest poking holes in the sake and soaking it with a mixture of sweetened condensed milk and coconut milk, sort of like a tres leches cake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What, exactly, is the "idiot requirement"?

So simple that anyone can make it .. even me .. guess that answers your question ...

Voila, the recipe is here! :wink:

Hi.....I tried getting the recipe but couldn't find it. I was directed to a list of forum topics which I couldn't find the recipe in. Can anyone help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By JesseK
      Hello,
       
      hoping someone can help me with some workflow questions. I've recently taken over the pastry role in a small tasting menu restaurant and we'd like to produce molded chocolate truffles for either mignardise or take-aways. We have 5 poly trays of molds that hold 40/tray and we'd like to produce roughly that many per week (200). Time and space is tight so I'd like to do this in one go, once per week. The problem I'm having is I don't know the proper workflow for creating this many candies at once. We do not have a tempering machine so it would be stovetop tempering. Is it possible to do that in one go with one big bowl of chocolate? In the past I've made truffles, but always discarded the chocolate after filling the molds. Is it a bad idea to put chocolate from the molds back into the large batch of tempered chocolate? (i.e. fill the molds with chocolate, let the shell set (1-2 mins) then when tipping the chocolate out, can that be tipped back into the large batch?) Also, any tips for large batch tempering of chocolate? We don't have a marble slab so the seeded method is really the only one. The real question is how can I keep a large batch of chocolate tempered for the time it takes to produce 200 molded candies? We have minimal equipment for this kind of operation and I'd be tempering over a double boiler then using ambient heat from a frenchtop to maintain temperature. 
       
      Is this too much to do without a tempering machine? I'm worried about maintaining the temperature of the tempered chocolate during the time it takes to fill 200 molds with filling. I know I can retemper if I lose it but I really need to work fast and efficiently to get this done in the timeframe that I have (~1hr). If anyone has some insight into a workflow it would be much appreciated. 
       
      Thanks,
       
      Jesse
    • By nonkeyman
      I finally found a place better than Molly Moons.
      In Seattle Washington for Ice Cream. I was actually not very found of Molly Moons. It is to cloy for me. Has anyone here been to Sweet Alchemy?(They don't have a website yet...so here is a blurb about them)
       
      It is on 43rd and University Way. I thought it was Haagan Daz still because they haven't changed the banner. It is really good! They just are slightly expensive...3.80$ for their cheapest cone. I forgot to check if they have a children's scoop. They do a lot of fun and solid flavors. A tale of two teas, butter beer, Blueberry Lavender, Chai Tea, etc. They even have a very good vegan option called Monkey Berry Bash! It is made with coconut milk and really is quite good.
       
      Besides the price. I think it is worth to go once!
    • By Darienne
      Yesterday I made my familiar go-to simple lime/cream cheese pie with one egg, some milk, lime juice & zest, etc, covered with a dark chocolate ganache: heavy cream, a dollop of butter.  It's in the fridge covered with a plastic topper but I can cover it with plastic wrap or aluminum foil.

      Today's lunch guest is not coming...onslaught of sleet, freezing rain, and now snow...oh goodie...winter's here...  Now she is slated for next Thursday.  Is there any possibility that the pie can last that long and not poison or at least revolt us?

      Thanks.
    • By cakewalk
      Can cake batter be frozen, then defrosted several days, weeks, or even months later for baking? If so, does this cause any changes in the way the cake bakes? This seems preferable to baking and then freezing the cake(s) because of considerations such as room in the freezer, but mostly, for me, because of time considerations. Has anyone ever done this?
    • By ryangary
      I bought a box of molten chocolate cakes from Presidents Choice that you cook from frozen in the microwave for 45 seconds or so. They come out perfect but the chocolate they use is inferior. My question is, if I was to make my own chocolate cakes let them cool, then freeze them, reheating them in the microwave for the same amount of time would they work. I like the fact that I can have a dozen or so in the freezer and just nuking them when friends pop in. Help me make this work! Please.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.