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Employeers Responsibility Towards Employees


cheech44
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I am required by law to give an employee two weeks notice, or wages in lieu of notice after one year. The employee is obligated to give two weeks notice or forfeit two weeks wages if they don't.

Is that all across Canada, Shelley? Too bad it doesn't work that way in the U.S., or the dual obligations would be more clear-cut.

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Wait, we're not talking about employees sabotaging equipment or dusting cigarette ashes into food

No, I wasn't thinking about this type of outright cruelty, either. But I think the temptation is very high (bonus or no bonus) to slack off, or pilfer, or take advantage in as may ways as possible, when one no longer feels bound by the terms of their employment.

I was simply trying to stress that "buying loyalty" is just as an utopian idea as assuming all employees are decent honest people. And the notion of offering to pay someone extra to stay is all well and good I suppose, but just because they stay doesn't mean they still won't be tempted to engage in dishonest behavior in the meantime.

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Wait, we're not talking about employees sabotaging equipment or dusting cigarette ashes into food

No, I wasn't thinking about this type of outright cruelty, either. But I think the temptation is very high (bonus or no bonus) to slack off, or pilfer, or take advantage in as may ways as possible, when one no longer feels bound by the terms of their employment.

I was simply trying to stress that "buying loyalty" is just as an utopian idea as assuming all employees are decent honest people. And the notion of offering to pay someone extra to stay is all well and good I suppose, but just because they stay doesn't mean they still won't be tempted to engage in dishonest behavior in the meantime.

I think if you expect honesty from your employees, it is reasonable for them to expect you to be honest as well. Wouldn't anything less be demonstrating that management does not feel bound by the terms of employment, which is after all a two-way street?

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I am required by law to give an employee two weeks notice, or wages in lieu of notice after one year. The employee is obligated to give two weeks notice or forfeit two weeks wages if they don't.

Is that all across Canada, Shelley? Too bad it doesn't work that way in the U.S., or the dual obligations would be more clear-cut.

Labour standards vary somewhat across the country, but I believe that the issue of notice is fairly consistent. Very few employers actually pursue their rights, though, according to various officials I've spoken to. I will say that many U.S. states are far more business friendly than here in Canada, overall.

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I think if you expect honesty from your employees, it is reasonable for them to expect you to be honest as well. Wouldn't anything less be demonstrating that management does not feel bound by the terms of employment, which is after all a two-way street?

I am not at all debating the ideals of an honest employee/employer relationship; obviously it is preferable. But unfortunately for me and perhaps others as well, it boils down to the basic principle "fool me once, shame on you..."

If given the opportunity to sell another business, would I personally take the "high road" and divulge everything to my employees? Sorry, but the answer is a definite "No."

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I think if you expect honesty from your employees, it is reasonable for them to expect you to be honest as well. Wouldn't anything less be demonstrating that management does not feel bound by the terms of employment, which is after all a two-way street?

I am not at all debating the ideals of an honest employee/employer relationship; obviously it is preferable. But unfortunately for me and perhaps others as well, it boils down to the basic principle "fool me once, shame on you..."

If given the opportunity to sell another business, would I personally take the "high road" and divulge everything to my employees? Sorry, but the answer is a definite "No."

Then they are probably right to be mistrustful. I'm sure they know you would leave them high and dry, and I wouldn't blame them if they left at the first rumor.

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Lots of thoughts and opinions here. All of them have a point one way or the other. The thing I see here is that you have sold the business and you need to get out with your skin intact.

I would think that the business needs to be "open" when the transition takes place otherwise you would have shut the doors and not dealt with any of this. What are they new owners intentions ? Keep everyone or bring in new ? Find that out as it makes it easier to help with the transition. Honour any prior arrangements ie: pay raises, vacations etc. Go out with your head held high . Help some staff find new jobs with other friends in the industry. Work out a short term contract for key staff to stay on and train the new staff, negoiate a rate for them with the new owner. Who will train the new owner as far as regular guests, where everything is, recipes, blah, blah, blah. As you will surface again one day in another location of some sort, do the right thing. These people have assisted you in many ways in making the business marketable to the new owner. Bring the new owner in on this dilemma as it will more than likely spill over unto them.

I say this through clenched teeth as I just had to fire some staff for theft. I realize that they will screw you if they get the chance.

It really comes down to what kind of person you are.

As for a bonus to stay on - they were paid for every hour that they worked and perhaps you were not. Some months there might not have been any extra money left over and you had to go without - this is your payday, not their's. Some might leave, some will stay, the doors will always open tomorrow, nobody is more important than the restaurant ! It might be hard but their is a light at the end of the tunnel - permenant vacation :biggrin:

Neil Wyles

Hamilton Street Grill

www.hamiltonstreetgrill.com

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Lots of thoughts and opinions here. All of them have a point one way or the other. The thing I see here is that you have sold the business and you need to get out with your skin intact.

As for a bonus to stay on - they were paid for every hour that they worked and perhaps you were not. Some months there might not have been any extra money left over and you had to go without - this is your payday, not their's. Some might leave, some will stay, the doors will always open tomorrow, nobody is more important than the restaurant ! It might be hard but their is a light at the end of the tunnel - permenant vacation  :biggrin:

That is an interesting point, Neil. Definitely. I was certainly not able to pay myself anything for quite a while, and I worked the usual brutally long hours. And there were definitely months when there was no extra money to pay myself with. I never begrudged the staff their paycheques, and avoided cutting hours like mad, which was why stealing infuriated me so much. Although I would try to be as fair and flexible as possible, if I were to sell my restaurant, I think that I would view it as you have articulated it - as my payday. Thanks for the viewpoint.

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It is risky. I was deeply hurt when loyal employees jumped ship in a similar situation (when I told them the straight deal), leaving me up the creek without a paddle. With not enough key help I had to just lock the door.

True, but as far as they were concerned, you were disloyal first by selling your business and depriving them of their livelihood.

What actually happeneed was: My wife got cancer and I had to drive her 150 (miles one way) for chemo treatments several times a week. I was thinking of selling the restaurant and confided in a trusted employee. Rumors flew, resentments reared their nasty heads and folks bailed. I could not do it without key help and had to just lock the door, which deprived everyone a livelyhood.

I will never again, have a business that requires employees ( at lesast not here where there is an alergey to work).

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What actually happeneed was: My wife got cancer and I had to drive her 150 (miles one way) for chemo treatments several times a week. I was thinking of selling the restaurant and confided in a trusted employee. Rumors flew, resentments reared their nasty heads and folks bailed. I could not do it without key help and had to just lock the door, which deprived everyone a livelyhood.

I will never again, have a business that requires employees ( at lesast not here where there is an alergey to work).

I sit here shaking my head. The lows that some people will go never fails to astonish me. It saddens me to know that someone had to close the doors because of a lack of manpower and compassion. Perhaps a mid-week surprise - " I just sold the restaurant " does not look so terrible. At the end of the day , it is all about the owner, his / her family and the sacrifices that they have made. If staff can find jobs that fast , perhaps the shorter the notice the better. It will be a situation that I will be in one day so I will reflect upon this discussion and take it all under advisement.

Neil Wyles

Hamilton Street Grill

www.hamiltonstreetgrill.com

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