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scott123

Low Carb Bread

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I am in the process of developing a low carb bread/pizza crust. I have two versions at the moment. One is a combo of soy flour, almond flour and wheat protein isolate and the other version subs vital wheat gluten for the isolate. So, from a perspective of sustaining the yeast, the WPI version will rely entirely on added sugar, whereas the VWG version will work with both added sugar as well as the trace amount of starch in the gluten flour.

My goal is to add just enough sugar to sustain the yeast for the duration of it's lifecycle, and no more, keeping residual sugar content to the barest minimum.

My first plan of attack will be to utilize a wet sponge method with frequent whisking to encourage an aerobic environment for the yeast.

The second part of my plan will be to mix 8 small batches of dough, each with slightly more table sugar than the last, and then observing the rise I get from each.

Would you have any other ideas that might help me in my quest?

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I am in the process of developing a low carb bread/pizza crust.  I have two versions at the moment.  One is a combo of soy flour, almond flour and wheat protein isolate and the other version subs vital wheat gluten for the isolate. So, from a perspective of sustaining the yeast, the WPI version will rely entirely on added sugar, whereas the VWG version will work with both added sugar as well as the trace amount of starch in the gluten flour.

My goal is to add just enough sugar to sustain the yeast for the duration of it's lifecycle, and no more, keeping residual sugar content to the barest minimum.

My first plan of attack will be to utilize a wet sponge method with frequent whisking to encourage an aerobic environment for the yeast.

The second part of my plan will be to mix 8 small batches of dough, each with slightly more table sugar than the last, and then observing the rise I get from each.

Would you have any other ideas that might help me in my quest?

Hi Scott 123,

    Sounds like you've got a pretty good testing system in place, so I wouldn't mess with that. However, you may find that you don't need any sugar at all in either version as there is plenty of glucose in the endosperm of the various flours you are using to sustain the yeast, especially if you ferment slowly and at moderately cool temperatures (75-80 degrees, plus or minus). Of course, it will taste better with some sugar (or honey), but then there's those "nasty" carbs again (or you could try Splenda or some form of sucrolose).  The biggest challenge for low carb bread makers is trying to get a product that is as satisfying as normal bread. It's hard because wheat flour is, especially when fermented properly, so naturally sweet ad tasty. My suggestion to low carb advocates is to bite the bullet during the early stages of your diet and stay off all bread for the proscribed period. Then, a few weeks later, when you're ready to add it back into your eating plan, focus on high fiber, whole grain breads. More and more bakeries (and home bakers) are getting quite good at making these. Besides my books, the old "Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book," has some great recipes for whole grain and multi grain breads.

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Thank you for your kind and thoughtful reply. The thought that almond and soy flour might have sufficient glucose for yeast growth would never have occured to me. I will make sure to include a sugarless control in my testing.

And your cold turkey/whole grain approach is very sage advice as well.

Before jumping on the low carb bandwagon, I was having a great deal of success with long cool rise breads. Although wheat plays a huge role in contributing flavor (obviously), doesn't the yeast play a role as well in that it creates different by products at lower temperatures than at higher ones?

I am thinking about utilizing a long cool rise with my low carb bread.

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Yes, go for it. Long, slow rise adds more acidity, which translates to better flavor (unless you overferment, which means you tipped over the alcohol/sugar balance). That's why less yeast is better than more--but it may take some trial and error before you get the time/temp./ingredient balance just right. But you're so organized and systematic that I think you'll nail it rather quickly. Let me know when you do.

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You are too kind. If you find yourself in this neighborhood in the near future, my results will be posted here. Especially my pizza crust results as pizza is my raison d'etre :)

When people ask me what books on bread they should get, yours are the one's I recommend. After reading your erudite responses to the members of this forum, it only strengthens my opinion of you as a pinnacle of bread making knowledge. Thank you for gracing this forum with your presence.

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You are too kind.  If you find yourself in this neighborhood in the near future, my results will be posted here.  Especially my pizza crust results as pizza is my raison d'etre :)

When people ask me what books on bread they should get, yours are the one's I recommend. After reading your erudite responses to the members of this forum, it only strengthens my opinion of you as a pinnacle of bread making knowledge. Thank you for gracing this forum with your presence.

Your very kind. Thank you!

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